2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Aug 08, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 122 Introduction to Computer Programming (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 121  and MATH 096  or MATH 098  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the concepts of computer program analysis, design, and development using modern structured programming methodologies and techniques. Involves structure charts, pseudocode, and flowcharts. Common computer program techniques of documentation, testing and validation, and implementation using one or more software development life cycle methodologies, and lab assignments to allow the student to interact with computer technology, hardware, and concepts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the syntax and semantics of the chosen computer language to create and modify programs using control statements, selections, functions basic data types and structures.
    2. Evaluate programs using nested and non-nested selection and looping.
    3. Apply basic algorithm and design tools to the programming process.
    4. Evaluate code with respect to its readability and maintainability.
    5. Identify and apply  exception handling and basic debugging strategies.
    6. Compare and contrast procedural programming with object-oriented programming.
    7. Define basic computer programming terms and concepts.
    8. Incorporate the correct use of programming environment software features, including debugging tools, editor features, and help options.
    9. Use comments and other techniques within programs to enhance its clarity and maintainability.
  
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    CIS 123 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 122  with 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP). Application of the concepts of inheritance, polymorphism, abstraction and encapsulation. Addresses classes, objects, and methods utilizing modularity, maintainability and reusability techniques. Introduces techniques for effective program coding, source code versioning and error handling techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop programs that breakdown complex problems using multiple algorithms, and utilize  control structures, methods and event handlers. 
    2. Develop an understanding of object-oriented programming (OOP) using classes, objects, interfaces and generics. 
    3. Program using object collections. 
    4. Design  effective programs  using Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams.
    5. Develop programs for maintainability  and reusability 
    6. Design and implement exceptions handling and test planning.
    7. Demonstrate OOP program concepts using inheritance, polymorphism, abstraction and encapsulation.
  
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    CIS 130 Productivity Software (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Learn the most popular software applications used for word processing, spreadsheet, database management, presentation, and note taking purposes using various local and cloud-based storage.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create, edit, format, and print/present documents using word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, note taking and database management applications.
    2. Maintain a secure, efficient computer system.
    3. Effectively communicate using terminology associated with productivity software and integrated software.
    4. Evaluate the capabilities and limitations of productivity software.
    5. Embed and link charts, graphs, and pictures into documents.
    7. Create an on-screen slide presentation using builds and transitions.
    8. Utilize ethical business practices.
    9. Identify the history and trends of careers involving productivity software knowledge, skills, and abilities.
    10. Collaborate interactively with internet based resources.
    11. Translate technical information into user-appropriate format.
    12. Manage files and the Windows environment.
  
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    CIS 134 Computer Hardware and Operating Systems (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 121  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the configuration and use of device operating systems, service and support, and client networking and data storage procedures. Hands-on lab exercises provide practical knowledge and experience in various operating system features.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare and contrast different operating systems.
    2. Use terminology and functions of operating systems. 
    3. Explain the boot process and create normal and emergency boot files.
    4. Demonstrate intermediate skills in effectively utilizing operating systems such as format, scandisk, defrag, use of switches, back-up and recovery.
    5. Describe general backup, recovery, and protection procedures.
    6. Troubleshoot hardware and software operating system problems.
    7. Describe various ways of defining/changing settings within different operating systems.
    8. Explain options to customize the operating system to accommodate the need for other languages and accessibility for physical limitations.
  
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    CIS 136 Spreadsheet Applications (5 credits)



    Prerequisite MATH 096  or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course introduces basic and advanced spreadsheet design and development mapped to the multiple levels of Microsoft Excel certifications. Topics will include creation and manipulation of spreadsheets, conversion to charts and graphs, and creation of macros. Additional coverage of data validation, data integrity, testing, legal constraints, retention policies, and documentation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate basic computer usage skills such as saving files, backups, file management, security, and virus checking.
    2. Translate technical information into user-appropriate format.
    3. Solve mathematical, accounting, logical, and statistical problems using spreadsheet capabilities.
    4. Create, modify, and run macros using an appropriate programming/scripting language.
    5. Design and create spreadsheets, graphs, and charts to accurately summarize and document information.
    6. Sort, pivot, and filter data.
    7. Validate and manage data.
    8. Perform goal-seeking and what-if-analysis.
    9. Build and use spreadsheet templates.
    10. Import, convert, link, and export data from one application to another.
    11. Link spreadsheets with other documents.
    12. Organize data using spreadsheet database capabilities.
  
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    CIS 137 Applied Spreadsheet Applications I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission to any BAS program.

    Course Description
    Microsoft Excel is an integral part of most business organizations. It is a robust data tracking, analytical, and decision-making tool used by for-profit and non-profit organizations around the world. It is commonly applied for operational, marketing, and financial computations decision-making. Business professionals who hold Excel certifications demonstrate facility with this powerful software and ability to add value to an organization. This is a beginning spreadsheet course in Microsoft Excel that ties to the first level Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create, customize, and manage worksheets and workbooks for distribution.
    2. Summarize, organize and format data cells and ranges.
    3. Create, format, filter, and sort Excel tables.
    4. Use Excel functions to perform calculations on data, perform conditional operations, and modify text data.
    5. Create and format charts and objects (such as text boxes, images, and shapes).
    6. Demonstrate basic computer usage skills such as saving files, backups, file management, security, and virus checking.
    7. Translate technical information into user-appropriate format.
    8. Validate and manage data integrity.
    9. Design spreadsheets to meet accessibility requirements.
  
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    CIS 138 Applied Spreadsheet Application II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 137  with a 2.0 or higher.

    Course Description
    Microsoft Excel is an integral part of most business organizations. It is a robust data tracking, analytical, and decision-making tool used by for-profit and non-profit organizations around the world. It is commonly applied for operational, marketing, and financial computations decision-making. Business professionals who hold Excel certifications demonstrate facility with this powerful software and ability to add value to an organization. This course covers the advanced topics in Microsoft Excel and ties to the second level Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certification exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Manage workbook options and settings such as templates, ribbons, macros, protection, and versions.
    2. Apply custom number, conditional, filtering, color, style, theme, and international formats and layouts.
    3. Create and use advanced date, time, logical, statistical, financial, and lookup formulas/functions.
    4. Create advanced charts and tables to include trend-lines, dual-axis, chart templates, Pivot Tables, Pivot Charts, and Slicers.
    5. Maintain safe, secure, and valid data and spreadsheet files according to business and legal requirements.
    6. Solve business problems in such fields as accounting, finance, operations, and marketing using spreadsheet capabilities.
    7. Provide legal, owner, and user spreadsheet documentation.
  
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    CIS 155 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Instructor permission only.

    Course Description
    Detailed coverage of a selected computer topic of current interest. Sample topics may include computer languages, hardware, and software development strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Research and communicate the issues related to the chosen course topic.
    2. Apply the chosen information systems technology to solve a given problem.
    3. Compare and contrast the chosen topic with earlier technologies.
    4. Evaluate the impact of the chosen topic.
  
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    CIS 185 Intermediate Object Oriented Programming (OOP) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 123  and CIS 260  both with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Addresses object-oriented programming for cross platform development using current data access frameworks. Employs objects to interact with relational databases. Learn cross platform data access using Entity Framework Core (EF Core), and Language Integrated Query (LINQ) to retrieve data from various data sources and formats. Builds on object-oriented programming principles identified in prerequisite courses.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Model system development techniques using object-oriented principles and Unified Modeling Language (UML).
    2. Design and implement a variety of class design patterns.
    3. Access and consume data from local and/or external data sources using frameworks such as Entity Framework Core (EF Core), and Language Integrated Query (LINQ).
    4. Demonstrate MVC (Model-View-Controller) programming  skills.
  
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    CIS 210 Business Analysis (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 121  with 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A study of the Business Analyst profession and generally accepted best practices. This course addresses analysis of the business environment, definition of stakeholder needs and recommendation for IT solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize Business Analysis best practices, tools, techniques and methodologies to meet stakeholder needs.
    2. Identify stakeholders, activities and techniques, management and assessment processes needed to complete the required deliverables.
    3. Analyze and develop training and materials for users.
    4. Develop feasibility studies for development versus acquisition decisions.
    5. Develop testing and implementation methodology and document all processes and solutions.
    6. Use appropriate interview and/or survey techniques to determine stakeholder needs and concerns.
    7. Create comprehensive solutions to business needs that can be delivered within scope.
    8. Manage conflicts with stakeholders.
    9. Manage scope changes with stakeholders.
    10. Identify gaps between proposed, and deployed, solutions versus the original needs and determine necessary changes to meet the required deliverables.
  
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    CIS 211 Applied Business Analysis (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission to any BAS program.

    Course Description
    This course studies the Business Analyst profession and its generally accepted best practices. This course addresses analysis of the business environment, definition of stakeholder needs, and recommendation for solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize Business Analysis best practices, tools, techniques and methodologies to meet stakeholder needs.
    2. Select and explain stakeholders, activities and techniques, management and assessment processes needed to complete the required deliverables.
    3. Develop feasibility studies for development versus acquisition decisions.
    4. Develop testing and implementation methodology and document all processes and solutions.
    5. Use appropriate interview and/or survey techniques to determine stakeholder needs and concerns.
    6. Create comprehensive solutions to business needs that can be delivered within scope.
    7. Use effective communication and negotiation skills to mediate and/or resolve conflicts among stakeholders.
    8. Validate and communicate scope definition, changes, and limitations with stakeholders.
    9. Analyze gaps between proposed, and deployed, solutions versus the original needs and determine necessary changes to meet the required deliverables.
  
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    CIS 215 Client-Side Web Development (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 122  with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to client-side web development using HTML (hypertext markup language), cascading style sheets (CSS), relevant scripting libraries JavaScript and current front-end frameworks. Apply client-side scripting to enable dynamic user interface (UI) presentation. Use current integrated development environment (IDE) to develop and deploy code to hosting providers. Explore current tools and techniques in client-side development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create static  web pages utilizing HTML.
    2. Utilize CSS to distinguish between webpage presentation and structure
    3. Create client-side  web pages that utilize  JavaScript and front-end frameworks (jQuery, current library frameworks)
    4. Interact  and communicate with the server.
    5. Apply basic programming techniques such as iteration, branching, 
    6. Use basic data structures such as arrays 
    7. Work with the Document Object Model (DOM) to retrieve and manipulate data.
  
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    CIS 216 Server-Side Web Development (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 123  and CIS 215 , both with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course covers the fundamental concepts of developing web pages using server-side web development. Topics include using Model-View-Controller (MVC) concepts and controls and server-side HTML generation, object-oriented programming, and database access. Learn the advantages of using Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture. Students will use one or more Integrated development environments (IDE).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create the required development environment.
    2. Develop and apply site management.
    3. Demonstrate proper use of data types.
    4. Implement caching and application events.
    5. Publish and discover web services utilizing industry-specific products.
    6. Retrieve and process external data.
    7. Debug code in the integrated development environment (IDE).
    8. Create server-side code that retrieves, processes, and returns data from the client-side.
  
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    CIS 260 Database Management Systems (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 122 , or concurrent, with 2.0 or above, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Concepts, theory, analysis and design of relational database management systems (RDBMS). This project-based class explores entity relationship modeling and database design fundamentals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss database management systems and database administration.
    2. Analyze, design, and create relational databases to meet industry and customer needs using current relational database management system software.
    3. Identify the business rules and customer requirements to be included in the data dictionary and data model.
    4. Differentiate between and create conceptual data models, logical data models and physical data models.
    5. Normalize relationships in tables.
    6. Use database design patterns in data modeling.
    7. Use modeling/diagramming software to model data.
    8. Validate, import, convert, and export data from one application to another.
    9. Create data queries that sort, filter, manipulate and calculate data.
    10. Discuss ethics and security issues and regulations surrounding data and databases.
    11. Test the integrity of the database design.
  
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    CIS 261 Structured Query Language (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 122  and CIS 260 , each with 2.0 or better (may be taken concurrently); or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL), the industry-standard language for storing, retrieving, displaying, and updating data in a relational database. Includes an introduction to extensions to standard SQL such as a procedural language extension such as Procedural Language-SQL PL/SQL or Transact-SQL (T-SQL).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Structured Query Language. 2. Create and analyze schemas from relational databases. 3. Format Structured Query Language queries. 4. Query and create views of databases. 5. Validate and manage data. 6. Differentiate Data Manipulation Language versus Data Definition Language versus Data Control Language. 7. Create, read, update, and delete data.
  
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    CIS 262 Database Administration Backup and Recovery (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 260  and CIS 261 , each with 2.0 or above, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course addresses the key tasks and functions required of a database administrator in a production environment. Students will gain experience creating and implementing a database, managing data, expanding the size of the database, implementing basic security and data integrity measures, and granting data access privileges to individual users.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze, design, and create relational databases using current relational database management system software.  
    2. Determine client and server-side configurations necessary for installing a database.  
    3. Create, startup, and shutdown an operational database.  
    4. Manage database files.  
    5. Diagnose and troubleshoot database problems.  
    6. Identify network problems that affect the database.  
    7. Monitor databases for performance and availability.  
    8. Manage users, privileges, and resources.  
    9. Identify network security risks related to the database.
    10. Discuss issues involved in developing an effective backup and recovery strategy.  
    11. Use appropriate restore and recovery methods and operations to resolve database failure.
    12. Apply different recovery techniques.  
    13. Use Data Definition Language (DDL) to create or modify database objects.  
    14. Use Data Control Language (DCL) to create roles and permissions and control access.
  
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    CIS 264 CIS Project Capstone (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 185 , CIS 262  and CIS 269  all with 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Project-based capstone course. Students will demonstrate proficiency of prior core course outcomes by analyzing, designing, developing, implementing and evaluating a real-life data driven application project using one or more software development life cycles.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize Business Analysis best practices, tools, techniques and methodologies to meet stakeholder needs.
    2. Identify stakeholders, activities and techniques, management and assessment processes needed to complete the required deliverables.
    3. Use appropriate interview and/or survey techniques to determine stakeholder needs and concerns.
    4. Identify the business rules and customer requirements to be included in the data dictionary and data model.
    5. Analyze and design components of an information management system using various techniques and tools within the traditional software development life cycle methodologies and/or Agile methodology.
    6. Identify and analyze standards and best practices for Information Technology governance and management.
    7. Analyze, design, and create relational databases to meet industry and customer needs using current relational database management system software.
    8. Differentiate between and create conceptual data models, logical data models and physical data models.
    9. Create database objects and queries using Structured Query Language (SQL).
    10. Query and create views of databases.
    11. Create, startup, and shutdown an operational database.
    12. Create client-side web forms that utilize ECMAScript, accept input, produce output, and communicate with the server.
    13. Create server-side code that retrieves, processes, and returns data from the client-side.
    14. Publish a data driven website to a public facing application hosting environment.
  
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    CIS 265 Data Communications and Networks (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 134  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An introduction to data communication and network terminology, operating concepts, network design, hardware and software. Reviews various specifications and standards for data communications hardware and software.  Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of various network systems and their availability, flexibility and performance. Participate in the design of a data communications network.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic hardware, software and services components used in network systems.
    2. Compare and contrast the alternatives in LAN media, topologies, access methods, and media.
    3. Summarize the seven layers of the open systems interconnection (OSI) reference model.
    4. Compare and contrast the different types of network cabling.
    5. Describe the major data link layer protocols
    6. Describe the major network layer protocols with an emphasis on IP, including addressing, subnetting, network address translation and IP configuration.
    7. Describe the major functions of network operating systems and directory services.
    8. Troubleshoot networks using standard troubleshooting tools.
    9. Describe the advantages/disadvantages of various network protocols.
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of connecting and managing various end user devices including mobile and WiFI configurations.
  
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    CIS 269 Advanced SQL Programming and Tuning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 261  with 2.0 or better; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An advanced course in Structure Query Language (SQL). Students will develop script files, stored procedures, and procedural language units, as well as diagnose and tune performance problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Manage procedural language program constructs.
    2. Describe the procedural language development environments.
    3. Create, execute, and maintain procedures, functions, packages and database triggers.
    4. Design procedural language packages and program units effectively.
    5. Describe T-SQL or PL/SQL supplied packages.
    6. Describe the causes of performance problems.
    7. Write and tune procedural language code effectively to maximize performance.
    8. Use diagnostic tools to gather information about SQL statement processing.
  
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    CIS 274 Applied Business Management Analytics (2 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 138  with a 2.0 or higher.

    Course Description
    This course supports business management decision-making by developing practical application business intelligence (BI) solutions using advanced spreadsheet functionality. Dashboards and KPIs will be designed and created to meet end user requirements. Connecting spreadsheets to third-party BI tools will also be discussed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss solving business problems and end user experience using Business Analytics and Business Intelligence.
    2. Identify, import, integrate, cleanse, and validate data for use in decision making.
    3. Analyze end user requirements and model with appropriate test data
    4. Develop presentation layer with dashboards and KPIs using advanced Excel functionality such as PivotTables, Pivot Charts, PowerPivot, Slicers Develop analytical reports including the use of filters and parameters.
    5. Analyze appropriate data connection to various third-party tools such as QlikView, Tableau, or PowerBI.
  
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    CIS 275 Business Analytics/Intelligence (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 136  and CIS 262 , both with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Development of practical business intelligence (BI) solutions using currently available toolsets. Topics include data cleansing, Extract Transform Load (ETL), and Data Warehouse implementation. BI tools will be used for reporting, integration , and analysis. Cubes and marts will be created to feed presentation layers for dashboards and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), providing needed user analytics.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create Bisemantic Models (BISM) – Stars, Snowflakes, and other models using Design Patterns as appropriate.
    2. Discuss performance options such as BISM storage options, caching, and partitioning.
    3. Query and manipulate multi-dimensional data using the MultiDimensional eXpressions (MDX) language.
    4. Discuss solving business problems and end user experience using Business Analytics and Business Intelligence.
    5. Analyze end user requirements and develop presentation layer with dashboards and KPIs using PowerPivot, and third party tools such as QlikView.
    6. Develop reports including the use of filters and parameters.
    7. Develop and deploy packages for ETL and data transformation.
    8. Develop and deploy dimension/facts tables, cubes, marts for data mining.
  
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    CIS 280 Systems Analysis and Design (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 210  with 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course introduces students to a systematic approach to defining needs, creating specifications, and designing information systems. Course discussion and hands-on case studies providing practical knowledge and experience. Waterfall and agile systems analysis and design techniques will be used to develop and document effective computer-based information systems projects. Students will also learn project management standards and create project plans using currently available project management application software.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and design components of an information management system using various techniques and tools within the traditional Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Waterfall methodology.
    2. Analyze and design components of a information management system using various techniques and tools within the traditional Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) Agile methodology.
    3. Utilize currently available project management software for tracking and reporting project tasks, costs, resources and timelines for both Waterfall and Agile projects.
    4. Analyze and discuss systems acquisition, implementation, testing, and on-going maintenance/monitoring issues, risks, and best practices.
    5. Identify and analyze professionalism and ethics in project SDLCs.
    6. Identify system risks and issues and mitigation strategies.
    7. Analyze and discuss governance, security, and privacy.
    8. Differentiate various Information Technology, PM, and management roles in Waterfall and Agile Information Technology environments.
    9. Analyze the business environment and how Information Technology supports the organization achieve business objectives.
    10. Identify and analyze standards and best practices for Information Technology governance and management such as ISACA’s COBIT and ISO standards.
    11. Identify and analyze industry relevant Information Technology career paths, computer certifications and staying current in a rapidly changing career field.
  
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    CIS 290 Supervised Internship (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS majors only with instructor or CIS program coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    This course allows the student to gain relevant experience working in a local business environment. Requires  150 hours of supervised work including associated resume preparation, job interviews, and internship documentation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply resume, interview, and professional skills in an internship environment. 
    2. Apply previously-learned classroom skills and knowledge in an organizational computing environment.
    3. Summarize the internship experience.
    4. Compare and contrast academic theory to business practice.

Computer Network Engineering

  
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    CNE 155 Special Topics Related to Computer Network Engineering (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Instructor permission only.

    Course Description
    Detailed coverage of important and/or evolving topics in computer network engineering.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate the issues related to the chosen course topic.
    2. Apply the chosen information systems technology to solve a given IT problem.
    3. Compare the chosen topic with earlier technologies.
    4. Evaluate the impact of the chosen topic.
  
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    CNE 231 Implementing Windows Client Operating System (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 121  with a 2.0 grade or better.

    Course Description
    This course is to provide individuals who are new to Microsoft Windows client operating system with the knowledge necessary to understand and identify the tasks involved in supporting Windows server products. This is an introductory course designed to provide an overview of networking concepts and how they are implemented in a Windows-based environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the installation of and upgrading to a Windows Client Operating System.
    2. Describe automating of installation of a Windows Client Operating System.
    3. Describe the disk management tools associated with a Windows Client Operating System.
    4. Describe the fundamentals for configuring and managing file systems.
    5. Describe the troubleshooting of the boot process and other system issues.
    6. Describe the configuration of the desktop environment.
    7. Describe the configuration of TCP/IP addressing and name resolution.
    8. Describe the configuration of a Windows Client Operating System to operate in a Microsoft Windows-based Network.
    9. Describe the configuration of a Windows Client Operating System for mobile computing.
    10. Describe the fundamentals of monitoring system resources and performance.
  
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    CNE 232 Installing and Configuring Windows Server (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 265  or CNE 241  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Install and configure Windows Server with Active Directory, Network Services, Local Storage, File and Print Services, Group Policy, and virtualization.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Install Windows Servers in Host and Compute Environments
    2. Implement Storage Solutions
    3. Implement Hyper-V
    4. Implement Windows Containers
    5. Implement High Availability
    6. Maintain and Monitor Server Environments
  
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    CNE 235 Administering Windows Server (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 232  with grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Administer Windows Server, Active Directory, DNS, Remote Access, Network Policy Server, File System Security, and Update Management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Implement Domain Name System (DNS)
    2. Implement DHCP and IPAM
    3. Implement Network Connectivity and Remote Access Solutions
    4. Implement Core and Distributed Network Solutions
    5. Implement an Advanced Network Infrastructure
  
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    CNE 237 Configuring Advanced Windows Server Services (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 232  with grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course addresses the implementation of advanced Windows Server services. Students will install, configure, and administer advanced Windows Server services including network services, file services, dynamic access control, network load balancing, failover clustering, disaster recovery, Active Directory Certificate Services, and Active Directory Federation Services.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Install and Configure Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS)
    2. Manage and Maintain AD DS
    3. Create and Manage Group Policy
    4. Implement Active Directory Certificate Services (AD CS)
    5. Implement Identity Federation and Access Solutions
  
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    CNE 241 CCNA 1: Introduction to Networks (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 121  (or concurrent with CIS 121); or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This is the first of a three-course sequence designed to prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This course introduces the architectures, models, protocols, and networking elements that connect users, devices, applications and data through the internet and across modern computer networks - including IP addressing and Ethernet fundamentals. By the end of the course, students can build simple local area networks (LANs) that integrate IP addressing schemes, foundational network security, and perform basic configurations for routers and switches.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the objectives set by the current CCNA standards: 

    Configure switches and end devices to provide access to local and remote network resources.
    Explain how physical and data link layer protocols support the operation of Ethernet in a switched network.
    Configure routers to enable end-to-end connectivity between remote devices.
    Create IPv4 and IPv6 addressing schemes and verify network connectivity between devices.
    Explain how the upper layers of the OSI model support network applications.
    Use security best practices to configure a small network.
    Troubleshoot connectivity in a small network.
  
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    CNE 242 CCNA 2: Switching, Routing and Wireless Essentials (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 241  with grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This is the second of a three-course sequence designed to prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This course focuses on switching technologies and router operations that support small-to-medium business networks and includes wireless local area networks (WLANs) and security concepts. Students learn key switching and routing concepts. They perform basic network configuration and troubleshooting, identify and mitigate LAN security threats, and configure and secure a basic WLAN.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the objectives set by the current CCNA standards:
    1. Configure VLANs and Inter-VLAN routing, applying security best practices.
    2. Troubleshoot inter-VLAN routing on Layer 3 devices.
    3. Configure redundancy on a switched network using STP and EtherChannel.
    4. Troubleshoot EtherChannel on switched networks.
    5. Explain how to support available and reliable networks using dynamic addressing and first-hop redundancy protocols.
    6. Configure dynamic address allocation in IPv6 networks.
    7. Configure WLANs using a WLC and L2 security best practices.
    8. Configure switch security to mitigate LAN attacks.
    9. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 static routing on routers.
  
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    CNE 243 CCNA 3: Enterprise Netwrkng, Security & Automation (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 242  with grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This is the third of a three-course sequence designed to prepare students for the Cisco CCNA certification. This course describes the architectures and considerations related to designing, securing, operating, and troubleshooting enterprise networks. This course covers wide area network (WAN) technologies and quality of service (QoS) mechanisms used for secure remote access. It also introduces software-defined networking, virtualization, and automation concepts that support the digitalization of networks. Students gain skills to configure and troubleshoot enterprise networks and learn to identify and protect against cybersecurity threats. They are introduced to network management tools and learn key concepts of software-defined networking, including controller-based architectures and how application programming interfaces (APIs) enable network automation.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the objectives set by the current CCNA standards:

    Configure single-area OSPFv2 in both point-to-point and multi-access networks.
    Explain how to mitigate threats and enhance network security using access control lists and security best practices.
    Implement standard IPv4 ACLs to filter traffic and secure administrative access.
    Configure NAT services on the edge router to provide IPv4 address scalability.
    Explain techniques to provide address scalability and secure remote access for WANs.
    Explain how to optimize, monitor, and troubleshoot scalable network architectures.
    Explain how networking devices implement QoS.
    Implement protocols to manage the network.
    Explain how technologies such as virtualization, software defined networking, and automation affect evolving networks.
  
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    CNE 245 CCCA Cybersecurity Operations (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 231  and CNE 241 , both with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course introduces the core security concepts and emphasizes the practical application of skills needed to monitor, detect, analyze and respond to cybercrime, cyberespionage, insider threats, advanced persistent threats, regulatory requirements, and other cybersecurity issues facing organizations.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the objectives set by the current CCCA standards:

    Explain the role of the role of the Cybersecurity Operations Analyst in the enterprise.
    Explain operating system, the operation of network infrastructure, and the operation of protocol and service features and characteristics needed to support cybersecurity analyses.
    Monitor security alerts for various types of network attacks.
    Analyze security threats and endpoint vulnerabilities.
    Apply incident response and handling models and procedures.
  
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    CNE 246 Designing and Implementing a Server Infrastructure (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 232  with a 2.0 grade or better or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course teaches the student the skills and knowledge necessary to design and implement a Windows Server Infrastructure.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Plan and implement a server deployment infrastructure with server upgrade and migration.
    2. Plan and deploy virtual machine manager services.
    3. Plan and implement file and storage services.
    4. Design and Maintain DHCP, DNS, Internet Protocol Address Management (IPAM), VPN, DirectAccess, Remote Access Services (RAS) and Network Access Protocol (NAP) Strategies.
    5. Design a forest and domain infrastructure.
    6. Design an Active Directory permission model.
    7. Design an Active Directory sites topology.
    8. Design a Domain Controller strategy.
    9. Design and implement a branch office infrastructure.
    10. Configure web site authentication and permissions.
  
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    CNE 251 Unix Administration (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 134  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Training in management and administration of networks, to address the issues of security, procedures and documentation, user support, printing, and file server organization. Includes administrative tools necessary to setup, manage, and use basic network services including security and E-mail.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate use of basic Linux tools (the shell, help system, text editors,etc.)
    2. Install Linux
    3. Configure Linux boot and shutdown processes
    4. Configure Linux interfaces and desktops
    5. Install software using Linux package managers
    6. Create and manage user and group accounts
    7. Manage disk and file systems
    8. Install hardware and device drivers
    9. Manage processes and system services
    10. Perform system monitoring
    11. Configure Networking
    12. Configure security
  
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    CNE 254 Fundamentals of Network Security (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CIS 265  or CNE 241  with a 2.0 grade or better.

    Course Description
    Provides students with the knowledge and skills to begin supporting network security within an organization.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the outcomes for the current CompTIA Security+ certification:

    Explain the fundamentals of network security, such as secure application development, automation concepts, virtualization and cloud computing concepts, cryptographic concepts, physical security controls, embedded and specialized systems, digital forensics, organizational security, and risk management processes and concepts.
    Analyze potential indicators and security assessments associated with application and network attacks
    Implement secure network designs and protocols
    Install and configure wireless security settings
    Implement identity, account management controls, authentication, and authorization solutions
    Implement public key infrastructure
  
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    CNE 260 CISCO CCNA Security (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 242  with grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the core security concepts and skills needed for the installation, troubleshooting, and monitoring of network devices.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will meet the objectives set by the current CCNA Security standards:
    1. Secure the network perimeter and administrative access
    2. Configure IPS to mitigate attacks on the network
    3. Implement endpoint and Layer 2 security features
    4. Implement data confidentiality and integrity
    5. Implement secure virtual private networks and firewall configurations 
    6. Create a technical security policy drawing upon network security tests
  
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    CNE 270 Introduction to Powershell (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE 232  with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course introduces PowerShell as a task-based command-line shell and scripting language. The course introduces PowerShell cmdlets, explains the operation of the PowerShell pipeline, examines the use of PowerShell in remote management and in Windows Management Instrumentation, and introduces PowerShell scripting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use the PowerShell help system to research PowerShell concepts and functionality
    3. Describe and use the PowerShell pipeline
    4. Describe and use PowerShell objects
    5. Describe and use the PowerShell formatting and filtering
    6. Explain the importance of PowerShell Windows Management Instrumentation
    7. Describe and use PowerShell I/O
    8. Explain the basics of PowerShell scripting
  
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    CNE 290 Supervised Internship (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CNE Major Only with instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Supervised work experience of 25 hours per week in a network support environment (250 hours).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply previously-learned classroom skills and knowledge in an organizational network computing environment.
    2. Summarize the internship experience through daily journal entries, weekly reports, and periodic instructor conferences, explaining how instruction was relevant to work performed.
    3. Demonstrate professionalism through punctuality, appearance, attitude, and social skills.
    4. Write a resume.

Computer Science

  
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    CS 202 Computer Science II (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CS& 141  with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP). Application of the concepts of inheritance, polymorphism, abstraction and encapsulation. Addresses classes, objects, recursion, basic data structures and abstract data types. Utilize maintainability, and reusability techniques. Introduce effective object-oriented programming, code versioning and error handling.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop programs by taking complex problems and breaking them down using various algorithms.
    2. Utilize branching, iteration, recursion, arrays (single- and multi-dimensional) and basic abstract data types (Lists, Queues, Sets, Stacks).
    3. Develop and design object-oriented programs using classes, interfaces, and objects
    4. Program and use data structures (arrays, linkedlist, binary tree) and related collections
    5. Apply recursion, searching, and sorting algorithms
    6. Design an effective program utilizing Unified Modeling Language (UML).
    7. Develop programs using maintainability  and reusability concepts such as method overloading, method overriding.
    8. Design and implement source code versioning and error handling.
    9. Develop programs using inheritance, polymorphism, abstraction and encapsulation.
    10. Formulate and understand (Big O) algorithmic performance, complexity and scalability.
  
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    CS& 141 Computer Science I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite MATH& 141 ; with at least a 2.0 grade, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The first in a two–quarter course focusing on structured and procedural programming. Topics include the basics of computer programming, loops, conditionals, methods, program design, debugging, flow charts, pseudo-code, and, object-oriented programming. No prior programming experience is required but is highly recommended. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the syntax and semantics of the chosen computer language to create and modify programs using loops, selections, control structures and arrays of basic data types.
    2. Predict the output of programs involving selection and looping
    3. Apply basic algorithms to the program design process.
    4. Evaluate code with respect to its maintainability.
    5. Identify and apply basic debugging strategies.
    6.Design, code, test, and debug small structural, procedural, and object-oriented programs.
    7. Define basic computer programming terms and concepts.
    8. Demonstrate the correct use of programming environment software features, including debugging tools, editor features, and help options.
    9. Incorporate comments and other techniques within programs to enhance usability and maintainability.

Construction Management

  
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    CONST 101 Introduction to Construction Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Construction Management processes are introduced, including industry terminology, business practices, estimating/bidding, scheduling, project management, field operations and career pathways.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use construction industry terminology, including project types, procurement methods, industry standards, contract language.
    2. Examine general principles of liens, taxes, bonds, and insurance
    3. Illustrate basic estimating, bidding, budget planning, quantitative takeoffs, productivity, and pricing principles and techniques.
    4. Prepare a construction project schedule.
    5. Examine construction management responsibilities and practices.
    6. Articulate the relationships between field operations and management.
    7. Develop career path plans for entering the construction industry or consulting services.
    8. Discover the importance of being a mentor, role model, and motivator of others to maintain morale and encourage others’ personal development.
    9. Articulate basics of Sustainable/Green Construction Practices currently in use in the industry.
    10. Articulate the importance of safety, cost, resources and ethics as related to construction projects.
  
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    CONST 140 Construction Drawings: Printreading (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to construction drawings with emphasis on reading, interpreting, and communicating the content of the documents.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to read and interpret construction drawings from a civil, architectural, mechanical, electrical, structural, landscape, and interior design perspective etc.
    2. Articulate the understanding of the organizational hierarchy of construction drawings.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to calculate dimensions using a scale and articulate the importance and accuracy of scale in construction drawings
    4. Recognize the relationships between plan view, elevations, sections, and details content from the construction drawing.
    5. Accurately communicate construction drawing content.
    6. .Demonstrate the ability to explain schematic, design development, and construction drawing phases.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to navigate a complete set of construction drawings and details.
  
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    CONST 150 Construction Documents (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 101  and CONST 140  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    Construction Documents and their use as a tool to manage the construction process.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use modern techniques and processes to interpret and problem solve issues in contracts, drawings and specifications.
    2. Use the divisions of Construction Specifications Institutes’ (CSI) and Master Format systems and demonstrate how/where to obtain appropriate information.
    3. Interpret the content of contract documents, including blue prints, details and specifications.
    4. Problem-solve actual situations requiring the use of drawings to complement other construction information.
    5. Communicate the difference between delivery methods typical of construction projects.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to generate typical documents using standard industry resources (i.e. AIA and CSI).
    7. Apply principles of construction law and ethics.
    8. Demonstrate the understand safety, topics, history of laws, and the importance of the Safety Plan.
  
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    CONST 160 Means and Methods I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 101  and CONST 140  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    The technical aspects of construction systems, including the procedures and methods for masonry, steel, wood, and concrete construction. Recent trends in construction materials are also covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate assembly methods for construction materials, including masonry, steel, wood, and concrete.
    2. Outline procedures for the use of various materials in the construction process.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of current developments in construction methods and materials.
    4. Interpret construction materials and methods terminology.
    5. Outline the LEED standards criteria and basics of sustainable building methods.
  
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    CONST 180 Building Codes (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A study of the application and administration of electrical, plumbing, and mechanical codes.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Successfully access code information for electrical, plumbing, mechanical work, structural, fire, accessibility, and elevators.
    2. Recognize and Interpret key electrical, plumbing, mechanical codes, structural, fire, accessibility, and elevators.
    3. Access, analyze, interpret, and apply International Building Codes
    4. Illustrate the historical perspective of codes within the construction industry
    5. Demonstrate ability to read and converse regarding codes
    6. Outline the purpose of the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) and the resources available through this organization
    7. Participate in discussions of code interpretation and negotiation
    8. Validate ethical behavior relative to business codes in group discussions and presentations
  
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    CONST 198 Work-Based Learning (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Construction Management program and instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Participants will pursue an organized career path plan by obtaining construction management work experience in their chosen area of interest.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Obtain construction management work experience in their area of interest through volunteering, job shadowing, interning, and/or agreeing to be evaluated by their current supervisor.
    2. Set written workplace learning objectives, develop a written plan for accomplishing these objectives, document the learning process, and assess their success in reaching the objectives.
    3. Write a career path plan communicating where they want to be in their careers five years in the future and the steps they will take to make it happen.
  
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    CONST 200 Estimating I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 150 , CONST 160 , BTECA 121 , BTECA 122 , and BTECA 123  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    A comprehensive introduction to construction estimating and bidding, including basic concepts, procedures, terminology, and pricing techniques. Covers work issues and costs connected with the major components of a construction project.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Determine how various resources (incl. Labor, equipment and materials) impact the estimating process.
    2. Recognize how an estimate is organized, what information is contained in the different types of estimates, and the accuracy of estimates (by type).
    3. Report how construction documents are used in the estimating process.
    4. Demonstrate the principles and practices of organized “quantity takeoff” to accurately determine the quantity of materials in a project.
    5. Relate what, when, and how subcontractors and suppliers are involved in putting estimates together.
    6. Show the various pricing components (labor, productivity and material) that are used to determine the cost of the project.
    7. Interface with a variety of technologies that used in the development of estimates.
  
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    CONST 230 Planning and Scheduling I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 150 , CONST 160 , BTECA 121 , BTECA 122 , and BTECA 123  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Principles of scheduling and planning to control and manage a construction project.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate ability to apply principles of schedule development and use to manage a typical construction project.
    2. Determine the critical path through a project by analysis of all project activities by developing activity durations.
    3. Resource load a schedule and use that information to analyze flow of work.
    4. Cost load a schedule and use that information to analyze and manage project cash flow.
    5. Using computerized industry software, produce a schedule that conforms to time limits based on “critical path planning.”
    6. Determine the appropriate construction sequence necessary to avoid unsafe working conditions.
  
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    CONST 250 Construction Safety and Accident Prevention (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Construction industry standards for accident prevention, hazard identification, and compliance responsibility are emphasized in conjunction with an overview of Occupational Safety and Health Act and other related federal and state legislative requirements.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Obtain the OSHA 10-hour certification
    2. Document up-to-date CPR/ First Aid certification
    3. Perform a job site safety inspection
    4. Effectively communicate safety expectations to a work team
    5. Conduct a Safety Meeting
    6. Write a job safety report including hazard analysis and safety
    liability issues
    7. Write a comprehensive project safety plan that complies with OSHA and/or
    WISHA standards
    8. Demonstrate ethical behavior relative to construction safety
  
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    CONST 260 Construction Project Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 150 , CONST 160 , BTECA 121 , BTECA 122 , and BTECA 123  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Project organization, documentation, and control methods utilized to manage all facets of a project from start to completion.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop project start up controls (data bases, reporting tools) for coordination between the field and business operations.
    2. Create documentation procedures and information management systems
    3. Utilize project financial management tools such as schedule of values, schedule of values and cost projections to control cash flow and costs
    4. Explain the process, importance, and distinction of the project management between the field operations and the business side of the project
    5. Write subcontracts and purchase agreements, developing finite scopes of work in the employment of subcontractors and suppliers.
    6. Explain the steps necessary to manage a quality construction project from start to finish.
    7. Understand the importance of safety on jobsites and the impacts that jobsite accidents can create for a project.
  
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    CONST 270 Introduction to Virtual Design & Construction (3 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 101 , CONST 140 , CONST 150 , CONST 160  all with a grade of 2.0 or better or instructor/program coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    Virtual Design and Construction (VDC)\Building Information Modeling(BIM) are introduced. Students will gain an understanding of how these construction management processes improve the coordination and control of a construction project.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the meaning and purpose of Virtual Design and Construction(VDC)\Building Information Modeling(BIM) and virtual tools and platforms to clients, peers and partners.
    2. Compare and contrast typical BIM software to determine which might be best for a firm, project or task.
    3.Summarize the differences between BIM for Owners/Facility Managers, Architects/Engineers, Contractors and Fabricators and how the tools and platforms might impact their workflows.
    4. Demonstrate to clients, peers and partners how the virtual tools and platforms alter or affect the project development lifecycle.
    5. Analyze the impacts the virtual tools and platforms have on design and constructability.
    6. Explain to clients, peers and partners how BIM might impact the construction process.
    7. Explain to clients, peers and partners how available tools and platforms improve project collaboration from design to construction to the commissioning of a facility.
    8. Explain consistent factors influencing BIM Return on Investment (ROI) at the project and the company levels.
    9. Analyze the risk, benefits and legal implication associated with BIM.
    10. Analyze intellectual property rights and licensing issues related to BIM use.
    11. Create and use a BIM Execution Plan in the context of a construction project.
  
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    CONST 271 Basic Modeling (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 270  with a grade of 2.0 or better or instructor/program coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    Students are introduced to various BIM tools, BIM platforms and basic model modification and creation.

    Student Outcomes
    A. Articulate parametric building modeling and building design.
    B. Examine various BIM tools and platforms and articulate how they impact the design, construction and operation of a facility.
    C. Identify and articulate interoperability as it relates to various BIM tools, and platforms.
    D. Manage and articulate project Datum.
    E. Prepare and manage project files within a BIM tool or platform.
    F. Use PDF, CAD, and other references as a basis for modeling and articulate the risk associated with each.
    G. Load, edit and manage files and their attributes.
    H. Apply and modify elevation and section views to communicate design intent and constructability.
    I. Import and modify standard model templates.
    J. Edit and model simple construction site objects with BIM tools and platforms.
    K. Understand work flows typical of design and model making.
  
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    CONST 272 Intermediate Modeling (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 271  with a minimum GPA of 2.0 or instructor/coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    Students will learn intermediate to advanced model creation from the focus of a general or specialty contractor.

    Student Outcomes
    • Modify and create walls and wall assemblies within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Modify and create object data within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Modify families and components within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Modify complex objects and structural elements within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Modify and create complex site objects i.e. scaffolding and formwork, within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Create model elements that match planned materials and methods within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Split and subdivide elements to match construction tasks within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Assign/link intelligent data to objects and components within BIM tools and platforms.
  
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    CONST 274 Model Based Collaboration (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 272  with a minimum GPA of 2.0 or instructor/coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    Students will use the building model and other building information modeling (BIM) tools and platforms for project collaboration and management of project information.

    Student Outcomes
    • Explain the federated model process to stakeholders.
    • Explain how project communication directly impacts project outcomes.
    • Utilize BIM tools and platforms to transmit current information to stakeholders.
    • Explain the benefits and risks of project work-sharing features.
    • Describe how changes to project design, scope, budget and schedule impact other team members and project outcomes.
    • Explain how BIM tools and platforms work within Integrated Project Delivery and other project delivery methods.
    • Explain to stakeholders the Design-Build-Operate life cycle and how BIM impacts each stage.
    • Use BIM tools and platforms to manage project information.
    • Manage the Technology or BIM tools and platforms within the scope of various projects.
    • Utilize clash detection features of BIM tools and platforms using existing reference files.
    • Relate how BIMs impacts on facility commissioning to stakeholders.
  
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    CONST 275 Model Integration: Estimation and Scheduling (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CONST 274  with a minimum GPA of 2.0 or instructor/coordinator permission.

    Course Description
    Students will learn to use BIM tools and platforms to manage, schedule and control construction projects.

    Student Outcomes
    • Explain the meaning of 4D and 5D BIM to stakeholders.
    • Use BIM tools and platforms to divide project into tasks by construction trade.
    • Use divided trade data to create quantity takeoffs and combine with location and productivity data to generate project schedules within BIM tools and platforms.
    • Use BIM tools and platforms to modify data and create 4D simulations of planned construction sequences to plan, analyze and control schedules.
    • Create schedules of materials for takeoffs, purchasing and logistics.
    • Identify inaccuracies in the data and models to improve scheduling.
    • Use the model to track the status of building elements and identify problems potential problems with scheduling.
    • Convert the model into building elements using BIM tools and platforms.
    • Using BIM tools and platforms add parameters and conditional formulas to compute cost.
    • Using BIM tools and platforms extract quantities from 2D views and the 3D project model.
    • Apply cost data from available catalogs to takeoff items using BIM tools and platforms.
    • Using BIM tools and platforms create or import an item and resource catalog.
    • Using BIM tools and platforms track changes and model revisions.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ 102 Introduction to Criminal Law (5 credits)



    Formerly CJ 105

    Course Description
    Basic introduction to the elements of criminal law and justice in the United States.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the origins of criminal law.
    2. Distinguish between criminal law and tort law.
    3. Given a scenario, analyze criminal justice statutes.
    4. Distinguish between the criminal liability of various parties to include but not limited to:
    * Principle
    * Accessory before the fact
    * Accessory after the fact
    5. Analyze the use of force by criminal justice officers and civilians.
    6. Distinguish appropriate use of various criminal defenses.
    7. Determine the advantages and disadvantages of the various sentencing schemes used in America with emphasis on Washington State.
    8. Given a scenario, predict the legal outcome of where constitutional rights conflict with the need for public order.
    9. Distinguish various levels of crimes against persons and use levels of crime against property.
    10. Examine, then support personal beliefs about the law through the use of scholarly research.
  
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    CJ 103 Criminal Justice: Success Seminar (1 credit)



    Course Description
    An introduction to the elements needed to be successful in the criminal justice two year and certificate(s) programs at Pierce College. This course prepares students in the educational processes of Pierce College Criminal Justice Programs and in the skills necessary to create a culminating portfolio project.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify areas and personnel in college resource departments.
    2. Create a flexible Educational Plan that can be changed upon college and individual needs.
    3. Create a portfolio template that will address Fundamental Areas of Knowledge, Professional Technical Outcomes and Core Ability Outcomes for individually identified associate degree(s) or certificate(s)
    4. Demonstrate proficiency in PowerPoint.
  
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    CJ 120 Constitutional Rights (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An examination of the First, Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution through the lens of social issues; and an analysis of the theoretical foundation of Constitutional Law and Restorative Justice.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify the common law sources of constitutional rights and foundations of case law.
    2.Identify and articulate primary sources of legal information within libraries, on the internet and other sources.
    3.Evaluate and distinguish between the foundational principles of constitutional rights and restorative justice.
    4.Compare and contrast and describe the strengths and weaknesses of Constitutional Law and Restorative Justice.
    5.Apply the principles of Constitutional rights to current issues by utilizing state and federal court cases.
  
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    CJ 128 Criminal Justice Wellness (2 credits)



    Course Description
    An introductory course designed to build the physical requirements for work in criminal justice agencies through the application of personal wellness plans.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Actively participate in a holistic approach to wellness.
    2. Design and implement a personal wellness plan.
    3. Complete the Physical Agility Test for various employment agencies.
  
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    CJ 144 Corrections Special Populations and Case Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An examination of specific correctional populations, their impact on the correctional systems, and current correctional case management practices, theories, public policies, strategies and techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Administer various assessment instruments used in correctional case management.
    2.Demonstrate interviewing skills while using an assessment instrument.
    3.Develop case management plans and data using current instruments being used in the field of corrections in the state of Washington.
    4.Compare and contrast various case management strategies currently being used with juveniles and adults in corrections and with specific populations.
    5.Explore the impact of one’s personal bias when working as a case manager.
    6.Communicate expectations to a client in a clear and thoughtful manner.
    7.Acknowledge the impact of one’s personal ethics and behaviors in corrections.
    8.Identify the specific population client’s effect on the criminal justice system to include financial, legal, and personnel issues.
    9.Recognize the impact on the specific population offender’s ability to function in the correctional system with the “label” of “special population”.
    10.Articulate how the penal system responds to meet the needs of specific population offenders’ current issues and challenges.
    11.Identify and articulate institutional and community programs available for specific populations of offenders and explain how the offenders access these programs.
    12.Articulate the historical impact of specific populations on the criminal justice system and the system’s ability to address them.
  
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    CJ 150 Introduction to Policing (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An examination of the history, philosophy, and current practices and cultural challenges of policing including the social, political, organizational, and legal environments where the police perform their roles in the United States of America.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will analyze the components and processes of law enforcement system.
    Students will communicate diverse perspectives and impacts of the law enforcement system on groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens.
    Students will engage with, discuss, and analyze contemporary issues, (e.g. social movements, legislation, media), in the law enforcement systems through an intersectional and multicultural lens.
    Students will explore their positionality and biases and how these impact their view of the law enforcement system.
  
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    CJ 200 Crime and Justice in America: The Issues (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course examines issues of social justice and privilege (race, gender, class, sexual orientation, etc.) and the effect upon self, clients, systems and public policy.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, privilege and socioeconomic class on the criminal justice system.
    2. Communicate with peers in ways that minimize and/or resolve cultural conflict.
    3. Examine past and current criminal justice theories, practices, trends, and responses to various laws, policies and procedures and their social impact.
    4. Evaluate personal values, beliefs and behaviors and their potential impact on the criminal justice system.
    5. Work effectively in diverse teams or groups.
    6. Defend personal opinions and beliefs about identified criminal justice issues through the use of scholarly research.
    7. Evaluate systematic response to public policy changes within various criminal justice agencies.
  
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    CJ 215 Drugs and Society (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An analysis of political and social conditions, drug trafficking, laws and current treatment philosophies regarding drug use, abuse, addiction and recovery as it pertains to the criminal justice system.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and examine the physical, emotional, and social characteristics of drug use and abuse in the community (which may include coworkers and clients).
    2.Articulate possible consequences of drug/alcohol manufacturing, distribution and use, including consequences for individuals, society, the criminal justice system, and environment.
    3.Define, use and categorize appropriate terms specific to drugs and drug use.
    4.Given a case study, identify critical information to determine possible areas of drug use and abuse.
    5.Assess individuals for possible drug use and/or abuse and make appropriate referrals.
    6.Analyze the major challenges in administrating “Drug Abuse Prevention” programs.
    7.Describe a variety of social theories surrounding psychoactive drug use and drug dependency.
    8.Determine which social theory applies to a given scenario involving drug use or drug abuse.
    9.Discuss the impact of drug control philosophy and legislation on the criminal justice system and society in the United States.
    10.Access community resources regarding drug use or drug abuse.
    11.Reflect upon personal drug use and abuse philosophy.
  
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    CJ 220 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (2 credits)



    Course Description
    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in criminal justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the historical development of the topic and how that development impacts current practices.
    2. Describe the social, political and economic implications of the topic.
    3. Compare and contrast differing perspectives regarding the topic and their interactions with the criminal justice system.
    4. Given a case study, determine how the existing criminal justice system and community service providers respond to the needs of the study.
    5. Examine cultural and ethical issues related to the topic(s).
    6. Reflect on personal ethical responsibilities related to the topic(s).
    7. Create a plan to implement personal/institutional change related to the topic(s).
  
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    CJ 221 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)



    Course Description
    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in criminal justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the historical development of the topic and how that development impacts current practices.
    2. Describe the social, political, and economic implications of the topic.
    3. Compare and contrast differing perspectives regarding the topic and their interactions with the criminal justice system.
    4. Given a case study, determine how the existing criminal justice system and community service providers respond to the needs of the study.
    5. Examine cultural and ethical issues related to the topic(s).
    6. Reflect on personal ethical responsibilities related to the topic(s).
    7. Create a plan to implement personal/institutional change related to the topic(s).
  
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    CJ 222 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (4 credits)



    Course Description
    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in criminal justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explain the historical development of the topic and how that development impacts current practices.
    2.Describe the social, political and economic implications of the topic.
    3.Compare and contrast differing perspectives regarding the topic and their interactions with the criminal justice system.
    4.Given a case study, determine how the existing criminal justice system and community service providers respond to the needs of the study.
    5.Examine cultural and ethical issues related to the topic(s).
    6.Reflect on personal ethical responsibilities related to the topic(s).
    7.Create a plan to implement personal/institutional change related to the topic(s).
  
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    CJ 223 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in criminal justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explain the historical development of the topic and how that development impacts current practices.
    2.Describe the social, political and economic implications of the topic.
    3.Compare and contrast differing perspectives regarding the topic and their interactions with the criminal justice system.
    4.Given a case study, determine how the existing criminal justice system and community service providers respond to the needs of the study.
    5.Examine cultural and ethical issues related to the topic(s).
    6.Reflect on personal ethical responsibilities related to the topic(s).
    7.Create a plan to implement personal/institutional change related to the topic(s).
  
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    CJ 224 Victimology and Advocacy (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An overview of current victim issues, laws, resources, treatments, recovery, and advocacy for victims of crime and other social problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Define basic terms, concepts, laws and ideas within the study of victimology.
    2.Identify sources of information to prevent, intervene/treat, advocate and respond to victims.
    3.Evaluate and distinguish between criminal justice and restorative justice responses to victims.
    4.Evaluate and distinguish between different types of treatment and advocacy for victims.
    5.Participate in a victim’s advocacy agency.
    6.Examine personal biases and beliefs concerning victimology and advocacy.
  
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    CJ 226 Criminal Justice Response to Terrorism (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with the basics of terrorism, the history, laws and recent issues and criminal justice responses to terrorism in the 21st Century.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe domestic and international threats to US security.
    2. Explain the difference between terrorism and disasters.
    3. Create a personal/household disaster plan and kit.
    4. Analyze an aspect of terrorism legislation, including its strengths/weaknesses.
    5. Identify and utilize local/state/federal resources, programs and community disaster plans.
    6. Examine individual biases regarding who is and who is not perceived to be a ‘terrorist’.
  
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    CJ 227 Funding and Program Development for Crime Prevention (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with the basics of the grant funding process for social programs (state & federal), and how to develop a prevention idea into a program that can be funded and measured.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify social program funding lines and sources.
    2. Explain the difference between grants/contracts, and outputs/outcomes.
    3. Formulate a program logic model for a crime/justice social program.
    4. Establish a budget, including both operating and capital expenses.
    5. Create a program proposal in an area of interest.
  
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    CJ 228 Community Emergency Response Teams (2 credits)



    Course Description
    Basic skills needed to respond to community’s and individual’s immediate needs in the aftermath of a disaster, when emergency services are not immediately available.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the types of hazards that are most likely to affect homes, workplaces and neighborhoods.
    2. Take steps to prepare self and family for a disaster.
    3. Describe the functions of CERT and their role in immediate response.
    4. Identify and reduce potential fire hazards in their homes, workplaces and neighborhoods.
    5. Work as a team to apply basic fire suppression strategies, resources and safety measures to extinguish a pan fire.
    6. Apply techniques for opening airways, controlling excessive bleeding , and treating for shock.
    7. Conduct triage under simulated disaster conditions.
    8. Perform head-to-toe patient assessment.
    9. Select and set up a treatment area.
    10. Employ basic treatments fro various injuries and apply splints to suspected fractures and sprains.
    11. Identify planning and size up requirements for potential search and rescue situations.
    12. Describe the most common techniques for searching a structure.
    13. Work as a team to apply safe techniques for debris removal and victim extrication.
    14. Describe ways to protect rescuers during search ad rescue operations.
    15. Describe the post-disaster emotional environment and the steps that rescuers can take to relieve their own stressors and those of disaster survivors.
    16. Describe CERT organization and documentation requirements.
  
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    CJ 245 Evidence Law (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of the laws governing the admission of evidence, federal rules of evidence, requirements for presenting and ensuring the reliability of various types of evidence (such as witness competence, questioning, objections, best evidence requirements for documents, exceptions, exclusions, etc.). Analysis of case decisions on the collection and presentation of evidence in criminal trials, and the application of laws to the law enforcement profession.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the forms and types of evidence used in criminal proceedings.
    2. Define the general tests for admissibility of evidence and issues of “contamination”.
    3. Identify the court proceedings for evidence admissibility.
    4. Evaluate witness credibility in legal cases.
    5. Analyze the legal aspects of admissibility of notetaking, photographs and sketch.
    6. Describe the major sources of documentary evidence and information and the practical and legal limitation on their use.
    7. Explain the rationales for allowing the major exceptions to the “Hearsay” rule and the rules that determine the applicability to such exceptions.
    8. Apply the rules of evidence to a case study and justify the sequence of actions.
    9. Examine and apply ethical conduct of a criminal investigation.
    10. Analyze the importance of the “best evidence rule” and apply to specific scenarios.
    11. Apply the rules of evidence, effects of testimony, witness statements the rationalize actions taken.
    12. Access and apply primary-source legal databases and resources, to include the American Academy of Forensic Science.
  
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    CJ 250 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 251 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Program Coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 252 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Program Coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 253 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 254 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 255 Criminal Justice Work Based Learning (8 credits)



    Prerequisite Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    Course Description
    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the full scope of duties and responses performed by a variety of personnel in a criminal justice agency.
    2. Identify internal and external customers of the criminal justice agency.
    3. Describe the relationship with and responsibilities of a criminal justice agency to the community(s) it serves.
    4. Identify the significance of organizational “chain of command” in responding to accountability and community safety.
    5. Communicate (orally and in writing) in ways that minimize conflict and maximize clarity.
    6. Support the mission of your selected agency or department through personal and professional actions.
    7. Perform expected duties of the criminal justice agency as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    8. Collaborate at regular intervals with criminal justice agency supervision to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    9. Work effectively with internal and external customers.
    10. Research employment opportunities and application processes of your selected criminal justice agency or department.
    11. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
  
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    CJ 260 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Explore/Cadet (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required.

    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with operational procedures, expectations and competencies of local law enforcement agencies through participation in an approved Law Enforcement Explorer/Cadet program. *Law Enforcement Agency sponsorship and Criminal Justice Department approval required. Criminal history background checks are required.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Examine cultural issues that impact law enforcement and how an agency’s mission, vision and professionalism policy address these issues.
    2.Demonstrate appropriate responses to a variety of patrol simulations.
    3.Review law enforcement technology available to officers.
    4.Secure a crime scene, collect, preserve, mark and transport evidence while maintaining the “chain of evidence”.
    5.Demonstrate a variety of levels of officer safety.
    6.Understand the history and application of criminal law as it pertains to current law enforcement.
    7.Access current laws and procedures that impact a law enforcement officer and his or her agency.
    8.Use appropriate level of force, given a law enforcement scenario.
    9.Construct legally defensible, behaviorally specific, non-judgmental, grammatically correct documents and reports.
    10.Examine personal past and current behaviors and beliefs related to law enforcement ethical standards.
  
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    CJ 261 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Reserve (10 credits)



    Prerequisite Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required.

    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with operational procedures, expectations and competencies needed to obtain “Reserve” status through participation and successful completion of an approved Law Enforcement Reserve academy/program. *Law Enforcement Agency sponsorship and Criminal Justice Department approval required. Criminal history background checks are required.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify factors and sources of “Criminal Procedures” in a variety of scenarios.
    2. Understand the premise, role and sources of substantive criminal law as it pertains to a law enforcement officer’s duties.
    3. Delineate the elements of a variety of crimes and degree of same.
    4. Apply the intent of legislation, statutory definitions and duties of law enforcement in regard to the complexities of Domestic Violence.
    5. Reflect upon one’s own personal bias and beliefs and the impact of such while communicating with and serving diverse populations.
    6. Construct legally defensible, non-judgmental, behaviorally specific, and grammatically correct documents and reports.
    7. Minimize conflict/crisis through cross-cultural communication and negotiations.
    8. Respond appropriately to a variety of patrol situations to include procedures, arrests, search, seizure and documentation.
    9. Appraise philosophical nuances of community policing and identify working/non-working models.
    10. Successfully demonstrate appropriate traffic enforcement in a variety of traffic scenarios.
    11. Explain and demonstrate the correct method of collecting, preserving, marking and transporting common types of evidence in various scenarios.
    12. Administer a number of defensive tactics techniques in simulated situations.
    13. Execute firearm safety and proficiency in simulated situations.
    14. Articulate various liability issues involved in Use of Force situations.
    15. Demonstrate the ability to drive a police vehicle competently under simulated emergency conditions.
    16. Perform in an ethical manner aligned with the stated mission and goals of that agency.
    17. Implement strategies as a member of a diverse team or group in a manner that is inclusive, and culturally sensitive that supports stated mission and goals.
  
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    CJ 262 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Officer (10 credits)



    Prerequisite Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required.

    Course Description
    Practical Application of knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to serve effectively as an entry level Law Enforcement Officer. Enforcement Agency sponsorship and Criminal Justice Department approval required. Criminal history background checks are required.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Establish clear understanding of fundamental knowledge, values, and skills necessary to effectively serve as a member of the law enforcement community.
    2. Manage a case that demonstrates a basic understanding of criminal investigation through the development of proficient basic preliminary investigation procedures associated with various crimes.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the Law and Legal Standards on which a law enforcement agency is grounded.
    4. Recognize the development and use of police power based on national, state, constitutional, criminal justice systemic, precedent and case laws and the impact on law enforcement and the citizens it serves.
    5. Apply knowledge of search and seizure, interrogation, arrest and use of force in a variety of scenarios.
    6. Assess the origins and applications of the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments in the role of a law enforcement officer.
    7. Reflect upon one’s own personal bias and beliefs and the impact of such while communicating with and serving diverse populations.
    8. Minimize conflict/crisis through cross-cultural communication and negotiations.
    9. Apply the intent of legislation, statutory definitions and duties of law enforcement in regard to the complexity of a number of social dynamics, including but not limited to domestic violence, sexual assault, mentally ill individuals, and substance abuse.
    10. Administer a number of defensive tactics techniques in simulated situations.
    11. Execute firearm safety and proficiency in simulated situations.
    12. Identify and implement a number of stress reducing and fitness building techniques.
    13. Respond appropriately to a variety of patrol situations to include procedures, arrest, search, seizure and documentation.
    14. Embrace the philosophy of community policing as a law enforcement tool.
    15. Construct legally defensible, non-judgmental, behaviorally specific, and grammatically correct documents and reports.
    16. Successfully demonstrate appropriate traffic enforcement in a variety of traffic scenarios.
    17. Perform duties in an ethical and professional manner aligned with stated mission and goals of that agency.
    18. Implement strategies as a member of a diverse team or group in a manner that is inclusive, culturally sensitive while supporting mission and goals.
  
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    CJ 270 Introduction to Investigative Profiling (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction into the basics of investigative profiling. This course examines the history, main theoretical approaches, and methods of investigative profiling.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Differentiate the main theoretical approaches to the study of criminal behavior and investigative criminology.
    2. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of criminal profiling and behavioral analysis of crimes.
    3. Discuss the history and use of profiling in homicide/death investigations.
    4. Identify criminal behavior and explain the development of criminal profiling as a science.
    5. Describe the importance of M.O. & signature and be able to identify each at a scene.
    6. Assess how the science and art of profiling crime scenes, and subsequently offenders, from physical and psychological evidence is key to the investigation of a violent serial killer.
    7. Explain the theories of deductive and inductive criminal profiling.
    8. Given a case study, analyze and apply the basic concepts of FBI methodology profiling and investigative profiling.
  
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    CJ 271 Introduction to Crime Analysis & Intelligence (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This introduction to the field of crime analysis covers the crime analysis profession, theory, and role of analysis in policing. Additionally, survey of the techniques for the types of crime analysis - tactical, strategic, operational, and administrative - is covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of the history and context of crime analysis within the criminal justice field.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the crime analysis and criminal intelligence process, intelligence-led policing, police strategies, the information sharing framework, and their roles in enhancing the criminal justice system.
    3. Identify and apply proper handling and collation of criminal intelligence information, including file management and information evaluation.
    4. Identify and articulate the legal, privacy, and ethical issues relating to intelligence.
    5. Identify information sources, information sharing systems, networks, centers, commercial and public databases, and other sources of information and their limitations.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the skills underlying analytic methods, including report writing, statistics, and graphic techniques.
    7. Differentiate between the key theoretical concepts which inform the practice of crime analysis.
    8. Identify relevant descriptive statistics used in crime analysis.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the pattern of identification process and problem-solving process and the relevant analysis methods of each.
    10. Demonstrate practical knowledge of the methods, tools, and techniques employed in analysis.
  
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    CJ 272 Criminal Investigations (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Through the lens of assigned criminal cases, students will explore investigative theory, sources of information, interview and interrogation techniques, false and coerced confessions, crime patterns, criminal law & procedures, the role of an investigator, and report writing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate understanding of how criminal investigation serves a larger function in the effectiveness of the Criminal Justice System.
    2. Discuss strengths, weaknesses, & limitations of various investigative techniques.
    3. Discuss the role of the investigator, on and off duty, with an emphasis on being a truth seeker.
    4. Analyze the main interview & interrogation techniques.
    5. Explain and apply the procedures for conducting a criminal investigation.
    6. Explain the evolution of criminal investigations and criminalistics.
    7. Identify crime patterns and patterns of crime.
    8. Interpret and apply criminal law procedures as related to criminal investigations.
    9. Explain the different sources of information and how/when to apply them.
    10. Accurately and ethically apply interview & interrogation techniques.
    11. Exhibit proper handling & collation of information, including file management & information evaluation
    12. Write accurate and logical reports.
    13. Given a case, be able to accurately and ethically apply criminal investigative techniques, strategies, and case management (to include the ability to articulate the reasoning for utilizing the methods chosen).
  
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    CJ 273 Crime Mapping Techniques (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Using data and examples from the crime analysis world, this course introduces students to the fundamental skills necessary to prepare crime maps and conduct spatial analysis for crime analysis projects.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of crime mapping research and practice.
    2. Utilize basic concepts of crime and place theory.
    3. Utilize basic concepts of geographic and tabular data.
    3. Know how to find and incorporate non-crime data sources.
    4. Demonstrate basic concepts of GIS systems.
    5. Demonstrate basic concepts of geodatabase management.
    6. Explain basic geoprocessing tools and processes.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of map layouts and exporting options.
    8. Differentiate types of descriptive mapping and symbolization.
    9. Demonstrate knowledge of density mapping and spatial analysis.
    10. Demonstrate an understanding of map production, dissemination, and use.
  
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    CJ 274 Criminal Behavior (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course is an examination of psychology of human behavior as it relates to crime. Focuses on the scientific study, psychological bases, and dynamics of criminal situations and criminal behavior; major theories of criminal and aggressive behavior; cognitive, psychodynamic, behavioral, social learning, descriptive, and developmental theories are discussed and compared with current classification systems. The student will be introduced to psychopathology, the sexually violent offender, and serial murder through the profiles of known offenders.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine major criminological theories.
    2. Analyze the personality profiles associated with crime (anti-social, psychopathic, psychosis, drugs & alcohol, adolescence, sexually-based).
    3. Discuss & differentiate major theories of criminal & aggressive behavior.
    4. Examine historical & current criminal classification systems.
    5. Apply course concepts to psychological & legal case studies.
    6. Discuss varying personality profiles, levels of motivations, & prognosis of homicidal offender.
  
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    CJ 275 Advanced Crime Analysis Techniques (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in CJ 271  and CJ 273  or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course encompasses concepts & technical skills across all major types of crime analysis (tactical, strategic, operations, & administrative), students will engage in a series of projects that replicate the analyses & challenges crime analysts regularly encounter.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply concepts of environmental criminology & situational crime prevention.
    2. Use commonly available desktop computing application to query data, perform statistical calculations, & create analytical reports & presentations.
    3. Apply common techniques of tactical crime analysis (pattern, threshold, geographic).
    4. Apply common techniques of strategic analysis & problem analysis (prepare stat reports, trend ID & forecasting, primary data collection, qualitative field research & analysis, & program evaluation).
    5. Apply common techniques of intelligence analysis (ID & prioritization or repeat offenders, link analysis of criminal organizations).
    6. Create effective internal & external products based on the various above analysis.
    7. Articulate the types of police approaches supported by these different analytical processes.
    8. Demonstrate how to effectively manage & administer a crime analysis unit within a police agency.
  
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    CJ 276 Empirical Profiling (5 credits)



    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in CJ 270  and CJ 274 , or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Psychological principles upon which offender profiling is based will be further explored, including classification of crime scene behavior, behavioral change, and behavioral consistency; application of empirical profiling.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify legal and societal issues relating to empirical profiling.
    2. Develop and deliver empirically-based profiles.
    3. Interpret the psychological behavior at a crime scene.
    4. Classify crime scene behaviors, behavioral changes, and behavioral consistency.
    5. Identify the Action to Characteristic equation.
    6. Identify, articulate, and apply crime linkage techniques.
  
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    CJ 277 Applied Crime Analysis Research & Design Methods (5 credits)



    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in CJ 274  and CJ 275  or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course exposes the student to the experience of developing an original crime analysis project & bringing the project to completion.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental methods criminologists use to conduct research and gather information.
    2. Differentiate between quantitative and qualitative approaches.
    3. Self-initiate an original project.
    4. Develop and/or obtain data necessary to complete project.
    5. Apply relevant theory to crime analysis projects.
    6. Utilize relevant analytical methods & tools to complete analytical task.
    7. Draw meaningful conclusions from analysis.
    8. Prepare comprehensive suite of analytical products for dissemination.
    9. Communicate findings of analysis through written & oral presentation to relevant audience.
    10. Develop crime intelligence through the process of critical thinking, logic, inference development, and recommendation development.
  
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    CJ 280 Criminal Justice Culminating Project (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Students will complete and deliver to the college and industry personnel their culminating portfolio project which demonstrates student learning of all outcomes (FAK, PTO, and CAO) for all specified criminal justice degree(s) or certificate(s).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create a portfolio of student’s successful completion of all Professional Technical, Core Abilities and Fundamental Areas of Knowledge Outcomes.
    2. Provide evidence that demonstrates student’s academic and professional readiness because of their learning at Pierce College or other institutions of higher education for all associate criminal justice degree and or certificates.
    3. Presentation of student portfolio to college and industry personnel demonstrating outcome(s), and achievement qualifications.
  
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    CJ& 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Science; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CJ 112

    Course Description
    A study of the Criminal Justice system, emphasizing history, theories and principles of criminology; programs, issues, trends, structures, functions and how the system responds to create an equitable delivery of crime-related public services. (Formerly Titled: CJ 112 – Criminal Justice in America)

    Student Outcomes
    Students will analyze the components and processes of the US criminal justice system.
    Students will communicate diverse perspectives and impacts of the criminal justice system on groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens.
    Students will analyze contemporary issues, (e.g. recidivism, social movements, legislation, media), in the criminal justice system through an intersectional and multicultural lens.
    Students will interrogate their positionality and biases and how they impact their view of and engagement in the criminal justice system.
  
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    CJ& 105 Corrections in America (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CJ 140

    Course Description
    A study of the history and ideologies of punishment and corrections, sanctioning and reintegration policies, and practices in the criminal justice system. Survey of programs, issues, and trends, and effects on communities relating to the corrections.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will analyze the components and processes of the US correctional system.
    Students will communicate diverse perspectives and impacts of the correctional system on groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens.
    Students will engage with, discuss, and analyze contemporary issues, (e.g. recidivism, capital punishment, privatization of prisons, sustainability), in the US correctional system through an intersectional and multicultural lens.
    Students will explore their positionality and biases and how these impact their view of the correctional system.
  
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    CJ& 106 Juvenile Justice (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CJ 115

    Course Description
    A historical and ideological examination of the juvenile justice system in the United States; analysis of policies, practices, laws, treatments, rights, current research, partner agencies, and their impact upon crime, juveniles, and the community. (Formerly Titled: CJ 115 – Juvenile Justice System)

    Student Outcomes
    Students will analyze the components and processes of the US juvenile justice system.
    Students will communicate diverse perspectives and impacts of the juvenile justice system on groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens.
    Students will analyze contemporary issues, (e.g. recidivism, diversion programs, alternative sentencing), in the juvenile justice system through an intersectional and multicultural lens.
     Students will compare the juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.
    Students will explore their positionality and biases and how these impact their view of the juvenile justice system.
  
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    CJ& 110 Criminal Law (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Science; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CJ 202

    Course Description
    An analysis of the fundamental concepts of both English Common Law and current statutory criminal law and defenses. To include: scope and nature of law; classification of offense; acts and intents; and elements of major criminal statutes. (Formerly Titled: CJ 202 – Concepts of Criminal Law)

    Student Outcomes
    Students will analyze the history and evolution of criminal law.
    Students will communicate diverse perspectives and implementation of criminal law on groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens.
    Students will explore their positionality, biases, values, and beliefs and how these impact their view of criminal law.
    Students will examine the interplay of the U.S. Constitution and laws and their implementation on diverse groups of people through an historical, intersectional, and multicultural lens. .
  
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    CJ& 240 Introduction to Forensic Science (5 credits)



    Formerly CJ 205

    Course Description
    Analysis of the history of crime scene investigations, practical use of technical equipment and scientific methods to assist in crime detection. Includes fingerprint identification, fingerprinting, casting, sketching, and crime scene photography. (Formerly Titled: CJ 205 – Investigative Technology)

    Student Outcomes
    Students will process and record evidence for the clarity of the receiver and in accordance with established industry standards.
    Students will analyze historical cases to identify patterns of evidence manipulation and its impact on diverse groups of people.
    Students will analyze contemporary issues (e.g. biometrics) in forensic science through an intersectional and multicultural lens.

Dental Hygiene

  
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    DHYG 271 Healthcare Foundations (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Acceptance into the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the foundational theory, laws and regulations required of all healthcare employees, but specifically, oral healthcare employees in Washington (WA) state. It includes management of medical emergencies and infection control for the dental hygiene professional, and personal, professional and community issues related to disease transmission.

    Student Outcomes
    Discuss the history of dental hygiene relating to the development of the profession, professional culture, and role of dental hygienists on the oral healthcare team.
    Apply understanding of laws and standards governing the dental professions.
    Correctly apply dental and medical terminology relating to oral health sciences and legal documentation for patient care.
    Apply the principles of disease transmission in oral healthcare and community settings.
    Correctly utilize and maintain dental and medical equipment.
    Correctly interpret patient medical history to mitigate the risk of medical emergencies.
    Effectively activate Emergency Response System.
    Correctly support and implement universal emergency intervention protocols.
  
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    DHYG 272 Dental Imaging I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An introductory course in dental radiology. Includes the history and principles of dental radiology, study of biological effects and patient safety, recommendations for dental radiographic examinations, and digital intra-oral dental radiographic techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the history of dental radiology.
    2. Explain the physical principles and biological effects involved in the production and clinical use of radiation (radiobiological health).
    3. Consistently and accurately describe and employ maximum radiation safety and asepsis procedures.
    4. Using the American Dental Association’s (ADA guidelines) for dental radiographic examinations, accurately determine and recommend a patient’s dental radiographic examination needs.
    5. Describe the various factors which influence density, contrast, definition and distortion of radiographic images.
    6. Explain the difference between interpretation and diagnosis and the roles of dental personnel in each.
    7. Consistently demonstrate accurate evaluation of intra-oral dental radiographs.
    8. Accurately describe and identify the image characteristics of diagnostic radiographs.
    9. Demonstrate correct techniques to create diagnostic bite-wing, periapical, full-mouth radiographic, and panoramic surveys using aseptic protocol.
    10. Explain the principles of shadow-casting in relationship to the paralleling technique.
    11. Correctly and consistently demonstrate use of dental imaging software in computer patient management systems by exposing, evaluating, recording, interpreting and storing digital radiographs.
    12. Identify digital intra-oral technique errors and demonstrate correction and prevention of these errors.
  
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    DHYG 273 Oral Disease Prevention and Cariology I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the basic principles of dental disease prevention. The relationship between cariology and preventive oral health concepts are introduced. An integrated component is scientific inquiry of quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define, spell, and utilize all preventive terminology presented in this course.
    2. Correctly explain the relationship between the application of current oral disease concepts and practices, early detection and prevention and treatment modalities
    3. Accurately describe the relationship of dental plaque biofilm to systemic and oral diseases.
    4. Accurately describe the etiology, development, and relevance of dental deposits and stains.
    5. Correctly explain and discuss the rationale for oral physiotherapy aids and demonstrate proper application and usage.
    6. Correctly state the purposes, indications, and contraindications for all categories of oral physiotherapy aids.
    7. Develop, present, and provide a written report on an oral physiotherapy aid’s project.
    8. Accurately identify agents in dentifrices that are being used or researched for caries, calculus, desensitizing, whitening, and gingivitis.
    9. Accurately identify and discuss the therapeutic effectiveness of antimicrobial agents that are being used or researched for caries and gingivitis.
    10. Accurately describe dental caries pathogenesis, describe the etiology, list contributing factors, and discuss their significance.
    11. Correctly define caries risk assessment categories and identify clinical management protocol.
    12. Demonstrate clinical proficiency while using disclosing solution in the identification of oral plaque biofilms.
    13. Demonstrate clinical proficiency in the identification of supragingival calculus
    14. Demonstrate clinical proficiency in the application of appropriate techniques for physiotherapy aids, dentifrices, mouth rinses, and oral irrigators.
    15. Demonstrate clinical proficiency utilizing caries activity testing in the determination of caries risk assessment.
    16. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level the use of a caries detection devices using correct technique and as part of the diagnostic process for occlusal decay.
    17. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of scientific research by accessing online and library resources.
  
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    DHYG 274 Biological Structures I: Dental Anatomy (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This is the first in a series of three courses. This course provides a comprehensive study of the human dentitions including primary and permanent tooth names, numbering conventions, eruption sequences, morphology, and anatomy.

    Student Outcomes
    These outcomes are specific and relevant to the theory and practice of dental hygiene. The student should be able to integrate essential anatomical facts and concepts of function into clinical observation and assessment of these structures. Other courses building upon this foundational include: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene, Oral Pathology, Periodontology, and Restorative Dentistry.

    In all class and lab settings, accurately and consistently:
    1. Demonstrate correct and accurate usage of terminology associated with course content
    2. Identify human teeth by anatomical name and numbering systems
    3. Describe and evaluate eruption sequences of primary and permanent dentitions
    4. Describe and discuss tooth morphology of the crowns and roots of primary and permanent dentitions
    5. Identify human teeth by the morphology of the crowns and roots
    6. Describe and discuss tooth anatomy of the crowns and roots of primary and permanent dentitions
    7. Identify human teeth by the morphology and anatomy of the crowns and roots
    8. Describe and discuss the normal development of dental occlusion and common malocclusions.
  
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    DHYG 275 General Pathology (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An introduction to the mechanisms of diseases, including basic genetics, and the recognition of characteristics of diseases encountered in the practice of dental hygiene.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss etiology and factors involved in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of disease.
    2. Discuss and accurately recognize abnormal growth patterns.
    3. Discuss and accurately recognize the signs and symptoms of inflammation.
    4. Describe and accurately recognize the types of immunity and autoimmunity and discuss their clinical considerations.
    5. Discuss allergy and the immune system.
    6. Describe and accurately recognize infectious diseases and discuss their diagnosis and clinical considerations.
    7. Describe common vaccines and accurately explain how they work.
    8. Accurately identify risk factors and recognize the warning signs of cancer.
    9. Accurately differentiate between benign and malignant neoplasms and discuss their diagnosis and clinical considerations.
    10.Describe DNA’s role in heredity.
    11.Describe and accurately recognize hereditary diseases and discuss their diagnosis and clinical considerations.
    12.Explain the function and importance of vitamins and minerals in the diet.
    13.Accurately identify manifestations of malnutrition, obesity, and substance abuse and discuss their clinical considerations.
 

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