2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Nov 28, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 034 High Beginning ESL Integrated - 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 191-200, and instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A high beginning level ESL course (integrating speaking, listening, reading, writing, and technology) for those who have mastered basic literacy and survival English, and who are read to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R 3.1 Decode and recognize everyday words in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules, using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 3.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 3.3 Locate discrete items of information in texts.
    R 3.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text making a list of new words, or using a simplified dictionary.
    R 3.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    2. Writing
    W 3.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 3.2 Follow a highly structured plan to organize ideas around a single familiar topic and produce a short but legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 3.3 Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary (such as words with personal significance and commonly-used adjectives, pronouns and prepositions) and simple sentence structures to produce a several sentences on a topic.
    W 3.4 Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
    3. Speaking
    S 3.1 Recall and use a somewhat limited vocabulary including words related to common, everyday topics, personal experience know and use basic grammar and sentence structure (heard in the immediate environment) know and use basic awareness of appropriate register (level of formality) in familiar, predictable communication tasks.
    S 3.2 Use simple strategies (such as reacting to questions or combining and recombining short known words or phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 3.3 Apply simple strategies (such as making and responding requests for feedback repetition, and rephrasing) to monitor and enhance the effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4. Listening
    L 3.1 Understand and respond to explanations, conversations, instructions, and narratives made up of sentence length utterances and some connected discourse on familiar topics related to personal background and needs, social conventions, and everyday tasks.
    L 3.2 Use several strategies, including formulas for asking for repetition and clarification, and strategies for indicating understanding, for giving feedback, for gathering missing information and/or for repairing problems in comprehension, such as by rephrasing, substituting a different word, or drawing a picture.
    L 3.3 Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as expressing an opinion or collecting relevant information) to understand the intent of the speaker and what is required to respond appropriately and to meet the listening purpose.
    5. Goals
    G 3.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly
  
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    ESL 035 High Beginning ESL Computer Technology and Job Readiness-3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 191 or above

    Course Description
    High beginning ESL technology and job readiness course for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Knowledge and Concepts:
    Begin to read independently, increase technology vocabulary, and with assistance, use a variety of sources such as electronic spell check and thesaurus as tools.
    2.Resource Gathering:
    Gather and share information gained form technology with others. Follow oral and/or written instructions for using technology. Collaborate on technological tasks, such as completing a basic word processing activity with instructor assistance, and simple Power Points , Excel spread sheets, Publisher activities and Word documents.
    3.Applied Proficiency:
    Use several basic computer software programs, Perform basic computer functions such as saving, retrieving, and printing. Identify all visible components and common software icons, beginning to use electronic devices such as fax, copier, flash drive and calculator, to acquire, process, and manage information Use word processing program to type sentences.
    4.G 3.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 036 High Beginning ESL Oral Communication and Grammar - 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 191 or above or completion ESL 026

    Course Description
    High Beginning Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing English to develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, educational, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 3.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 3.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions responding to simple, direct questions and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 3.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 3.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 040 Low Intermediate ESL Speaking-4 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A high intermediate level ESL course which develops the verbal ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Request, confirm, and clarify basic information in a variety of situations. (A, B, D, E, F, G)
    2.Give a reason or excuse for personal behavior or actions. (A, B, D, E, F, G)
    3.State a personal opinion and make simple statements of agreement or disagreement with other’s opinions. (A, B, C, E, F, G)
    4.Explain the steps in a process. (A, B, E, F, G)
    5.Provide accurate personal background and employment history in social or employment settings. (A, B, F, G)
    6.Ask for and give directions using a map. (A, B, D, E, F, G)
    7.Use and be aware of appropriate non-verbal language such as eye contact, body movement, and vocalizations while conversing. (E, F, G)
    8.Demonstrate the conversation skills of showing comprehension, asking questions, interrupting and encouraging others to participate. (A, B, C, E, F, G)
    9.Pronounce words and phrases in a manner usually understandable to the general public using appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation. (C, D, E, F)
  
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    ESL 041 Low Intermediate ESL Reading - 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 201 or above or completion of ESL 031

    Course Description
    A low intermediate level ESL course which develops the verbal ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    Reading
    R 4.1 Decode and recognize everyday words in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules, using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 4.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 4.3 Locate discrete items of information in texts.
    R 4.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text making a list of new words, or using a simplified dictionary.
    R 4.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.

    G 4.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 042 Low Intermediate ESL Reading - 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 201 and above or completion of ESL 032

    Course Description
    A low intermediate level ESL course which develops the verbal ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W 4.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 4.2 Follow a highly structured plan to organize ideas around a single familiar topic and produce a short but legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 4.3 Appropriately use every day, familiar vocabulary (such as words with personal significance and commonly-used adjectives, pronouns and prepositions) and simple sentence structures to produce a several sentences on a topic.
    W 4.4 Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
    2. Goals/Student Success Strategies
    G 4.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly
  
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    ESL 044 Low Intermediate ESL Integrated - 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 201-120, and instructor permission

    Course Description
    Low intermediate level ESL course (integrating speaking, listening, reading, writing, and technology) for those who have mastered basic literacy and survival English, and who need to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R 4.1 Decode and recognize everyday words in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules, using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 4.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 4.3 Locate discrete items of information in texts.
    R 4.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text making a list of new words, or using a simplified dictionary.
    R 4.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    2. Writing
    W 4.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 4.2 Follow a highly structured plan to organize ideas around a single familiar topic and produce a short but legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 4.3 Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary (such as words with personal significance and commonly-used adjectives, pronouns and prepositions) and simple sentence structures to produce a several sentences on a topic.
    W 3.4 Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
    3. Speaking
    S 4.1 Recall and use a somewhat limited vocabulary including words related to common, everyday topics, personal experience know and use basic grammar and sentence structure (heard in the immediate environment) know and use basic awareness of appropriate register (level of formality) in familiar, predictable communication tasks.
    S 4.2 Use simple strategies (such as reacting to questions or combining and recombining short known words or phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 4.3 Apply simple strategies (such as making and responding requests for feedback repetition, and rephrasing) to monitor and enhance the effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4. Listening
    L 4.1 Understand and respond to explanations, conversations, instructions, and narratives made up of sentence length utterances and some connected discourse on familiar topics related to personal background and needs, social conventions, and everyday tasks.
    L4.2 Use several strategies, including formulas for asking for repetition and clarification, and strategies for indicating understanding, for giving feedback, for gathering missing information and/or for repairing problems in comprehension, such as by rephrasing, substituting a different word, or drawing a picture.
    L 4.3 Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as expressing an opinion or collecting relevant information) to understand the intent of the speaker and what is required to respond appropriately and to meet the listening purpose.
    5. Goals
    G 4.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly
  
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    ESL 045 Low Intermediate ESL Computer Technology and Job Readiness-4 (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Casas Score of 201 or above or successful completion of ESL 035

    Course Description
    A low intermediate level ESL technology and job readiness for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Knowledge and Concepts:
    Read independently and continue to increase technology vocabulary by using tools such as help menus and directions. Demonstrate knowledge of the differences between drives,
    2. Resource Gathering:
    Explore topics and materials on the internet with assistance. Follow somewhat complex written and/or oral instructions for using technology. Begin to identify and access electronic materials, such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, and the internet. Collaborate with other students in acquiring and using technology with minimal assistance from the instructor.
    3. Applied Proficiency:
    Use a word processing program to compose and revise written materials such as paragraphs, informal letters, and/or resumes. Use software tools to check spelling, change fonts, change format, and access help screens.
    Begin to use email for personal communication. Access various software programs from a hard drive, CD, removable and/or disk drive. Save and retrieve personal data to a removable disk.
    4. G 4.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 046 Low Intermediate ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar - 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 210 or above or completion ESL 036

    Course Description
    Low Intermediate ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing English to develop and improve their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, educational, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 4.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 4.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions responding to simple, direct questions and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 4.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 4.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 050 High Intermediate ESL Speaking-5 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A low advanced level ESL course with develops the verbal ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Orally summarize and clarify information received from a single source. (D, E, F, G)
    2.Make an oral complaint and gives reasons for dissatisfaction to appropriate person or agency. (A, D, E, F, G)
    3.Demonstrate appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation patterns in pronunciation of words, phrases, statements and questions. (B, C, D, E, F)
    4.Demonstrate the use of small talk when initiating social or work-related content. (A, C, D, E, F, G)
    5.Report an accident, injury, or incident to the appropriate agency and provide details. (A, C, D, E, F, G)
    6.Explain information from simple graphs, diagrams, or maps. (D, E, F, G)
    7.Be able to advocate and negotiate for self and others. (A, C, D, E, F, G)
  
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    ESL 051 High Intermediate ESL Reading - 5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 211 or above or completion of ESL 041

    Course Description
    A High Intermediate level ESL course which develops reading ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    Reading
    R 5.1 Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words and abbreviations using word analysis or inference.
    R 5.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 5.3 Locate important information in text using a wide range of strategies.
    R 5.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace.
    R 5.5 Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization.
    R 5.6 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    G 5.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 052 High Intermediate ESL Writing - 5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 211-220, and instructor permission

    Course Description
    A high intermediate ESL course which develops the verbal and written ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W 5.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 5.2 Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (to convey personal experience, meet a specific need, or respond to recent learning), and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 5.3 Appropriately use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a few short, well-linked paragraphs to convey ideas with several supporting details/examples reflecting some attention to audience.
    W 5.4 Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness by re-reading and revising during the writing process and making revisions to a first and final draft based on review and feedback from others. Demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W 5.5 Make many edits of grammar (verb tense forms), spelling, sentence structure simple/compound/complex with appropriate capitalization and punctuation), language usage and text structure often with the help of tools such as simplified dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers.
    2. Goals
    G 5.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 054 High Intermediate ESL Integrated - 5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 211-220, and instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A high intermediate level integrated ESL speaking, listening, reading, and writing course for those who have mastered low intermediate ESL and who are ready to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R 5.1 Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words and abbreviations using word analysis or inference.
    R 5.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 5.3 Locate important information in text using a wide range of strategies.
    R 5.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace.
    R 5.5 Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization.
    R 5.6 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    2. Writing
    W 5.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 5.2 Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (to convey personal experience, meet a specific need, or respond to recent learning), and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 5.3 Appropriately use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a few short, well-linked paragraphs to convey ideas with several supporting details/examples reflecting some attention to audience.
    W 5.4 Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness by re-reading and revising during the writing process and making revisions to a first and final draft based on review and feedback from others. Demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W 5.5 Make many edits of grammar (verb tense forms), spelling, sentence structure simple/compound/complex with appropriate capitalization and punctuation), language usage and text structure often with the help of tools such as simplified dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers.
    3. Speaking
    S 5.1 Recall and use sufficient oral vocabulary (range of common, vocabulary related to personal experience and everyday activities, some idioms) as well as control of basic grammar and a variety of sentence types and registers in a range of familiar to somewhat unfamiliar or unpredictable communication tasks.
    S 5.2 Select from a range of strategies (such as elaborating with some detail and examples determining most important/right amount of information and content to convey) to select, organize, and relay information.
    S 5.3 Apply a range of strategies (including attention to appropriate register, repetition of information, adjustments in pace, tone, volume, eye contact, body language based on listener’s response and needs) to monitor and enhance effectiveness of communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4. Listening
    L 5.1 Understand and respond appropriately to extended explanations and narratives, detailed instructions, and complex conversations requiring adapting one’s response to varied speakers and contexts when language is not adjusted for English language learners.
    L 5.2 Effectively use a wide range of strategies to repair gaps in understanding and give feedback, tailoring the response to the purpose of the communication, the audience, the level of formality of the situation and other socio-cultural factors.
    L 5.3 Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as comparing, integrating, and categorizing information for others) to understand fully the literal and implied intent of the speaker, to respond appropriately, and to meet the listening purpose.
    5. Goals
    G 5.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 055 High Intermediate ESL Computer Technology and Job Readiness-5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite Casas Exam or successful completion of ESL 045

    Course Description
    A high intermediate level ESL technology and job readiness course for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Knowledge and Concepts:
    Describe what s/he is able to do with technology using appropriate technological vocabulary.
    Acquire and use the internet vocabulary, such as search engines, web sites, and URLs.
    Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the connection of computers through the internet.
    Begin to apply critical thinking principles, such as separating fact from opinion, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes to sources retrieved from a computer.
    2.Resource Gathering:
    Begin to recognize and seek assistance for common technical problems, such as a frozen screen, virus warning, and other warnings. Perform basic search of the internet with teacher/peer assistance.
    3.Applied Proficiency:
    Use word processing to compose and revise a document, such as business letter or report, with minimal errors. Use multiple common software, such as spreadsheets, graphics, and multimedia programs. Use basic functions of the internet, such as the location bar, back and forward buttons, and bookmarks. Use functions of email (compose, send, forward, delete, save) to increase written fluency.
    Use a word processing program to compose and revise written materials such as paragraphs, informal letters, and/or resumes. Use software tools to check spelling, change fonts, change format, and access help screens. Begin to use email for personal communication. Access various software programs. Save and retrieve personal data to a removable disk. Access distant learning.
    4.G 5.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 056 High Intermediate ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar - 5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 211 above or completion ESL 046

    Course Description
    High Intermediate ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing English to develop and improve their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, educational, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 5.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 5.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions; responding to simple, direct questions; and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 5.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 5.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 061 Advanced ESL Reading - 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 221 or above or completion of ESL 051.

    Course Description
    An advanced level ESL course which develops reading ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    Reading

    R 6.1 Recognize and interpret abbreviations and specialized vocabulary.
    R 6.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with paragraph structure and document organization.
    R 6.3 Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R 6.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as brainstorming and question formulation techniques.
    R 6.5 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast.
    R 6.4 Evaluate prior knowledge against new information in texts to enhance understanding of the information.
    G 6.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 062 Advanced ESL Writing - 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 221 and above or completion of ESL 052.

    Course Description
    An Advanced ESL course which develops the verbal and written ability to pursue realistic and long-term personal, career or academic goals, and to participate confidently and resourcefully in their overall environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W 6.2 Select from and use a good store of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 6.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms, and a variety of sentence structures, in medium-length, coherently-linked, and detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W 6.4 Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions (such as for clarity, organization, and descriptiveness) and to solve a few more global problems posed by the writing text (such as changes in voice or tone to take into account the needs of the audience or re-sequencing of larger pieces of text based on feedback from others).
    W 6.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and grammar guides.
    2. Goals
    G 6.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 064 Advanced ESL Integrated - 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 221-235, and instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An advanced level integrated ESL speaking, listening, reading, and writing course for those who have mastered high intermediate ESL and who are ready to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R 6.1 Recognize and interpret abbreviations and specialized vocabulary.
    R 6.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with paragraph structure and document organization.
    R 6.3 Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R 6.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as brainstorming and question formulation techniques.
    R 6.5 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast.
    R 6.4 Evaluate prior knowledge against new information in texts to enhance understanding of the information.
    2. Writing
    W 6.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 6.2 Select from and use a good store of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 6.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms, and a variety of sentence structures, in medium-length, coherently-linked, and detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W 6.4 Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions (such as for clarity, organization, and descriptiveness) and to solve a few more global problems posed by the writing text (such as changes in voice or tone to take into account the needs of the audience or re-sequencing of larger pieces of text based on feedback from others).
    W 6.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and grammar guides.
    3. Speaking
    S 6.1 Recall and use a range of vocabulary including words related to most everyday, school, work, and social situations; know and use a variety of complex sentence structures and grammatical forms; know and use appropriate register in a range of communicative tasks, including unfamiliar, unpredictable, and uncomfortable interactions.
    S 6.2 Select from a wide range of strategies (such as taking into account the interests of others; predicting outcomes, interests, or likely questions and responses; organizing information based on determination of relevance and audience needs; elaborating with significant detail and examples) to select, organize, and relay information.
    S 6.3 Apply a wide range of strategies (including body language, pause fillers, stalling devices, and different rates of speech as needed) to monitor and enhance effectiveness of communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4. Listening
    L 6.1 Understand main ideas and most details in conversations, short lectures, news reports, extended explanations and other connected discourse on a range of topics, including topics beyond everyday contexts and immediate experiences in a variety of work, personal, and basic academic contexts.
    L 6.2 Effectively use advanced strategies to repair gaps in understanding, to ask questions to deepen understanding and to give feedback appropriate to the situation, the audience and the purpose of the communication. Growing ability to use strategies appropriate to the socio-cultural context.
    L 6.3 Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as integrating information from more than one source; evaluating the relevance, validity, and adequacy of information; or adapting responses to the age, gender, status, and emotional state of the speaker) to understand fully the literal and implied intent of the speaker, to respond appropriately, and to meet the listening purpose.
    5. Goals
    G 6.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 065 Advanced ESL Computer Technology and Job Readiness- 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite Casas Score of 221 or above or successful completion of ESL 055

    Course Description
    Advanced level ESL technology and job readiness course for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Knowledge and Concepts:
    Describe what s/he is able to do with technology using appropriate technological vocabulary.
    Acquire and use the internet vocabulary, such as search engines, web sites, and URLs.
    Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the connection of computers through the internet.
    Begin to apply critical thinking principles, such as separating fact from opinion, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes to sources retrieved from a computer.
    2.Resource Gathering:
    Begin to recognize and seek assistance for common technical problems, such as a frozen screen, virus warning, and other warnings. Perform basic search of the internet with teacher/peer assistance.
    3.Applied Proficiency:
    Use word processing to compose and revise a document, such as business letter or report, with minimal errors. Use multiple common software, such as spreadsheets, graphics, and multimedia programs. Use basic functions of the internet, such as the location bar, back and forward buttons, and bookmarks. Use functions of email (compose, send, forward, delete, save) to increase written fluency.
    Use a word processing program to compose and revise written materials such as paragraphs, informal letters, and/or resumes. Use software tools to check spelling, change fonts, change format, and access help screens. Begin to use email for personal communication. Access various software programs. Save and retrieve personal data to a removable disk. Access distant learning.
    4.G 6.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 066 Advanced ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar - 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 221 above or completion ESL 056

    Course Description
    Advanced ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing English to develop and improve their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, educational, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 6.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 6.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions; responding to simple, direct questions; and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 6.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 6.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members; report progress on these goals; and revise and update them quarterly.
  
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    ESL 090 ESL Foundations for Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills and goal setting. Student outcomes were developed using the Four Components of the Community College Student Role, identified in the Guide to Transitions in Curriculum and approved by the Council for Basic Skills in October, 2013.

    Student Outcomes
    Component 1 – Academic Habits
    A. Students will assess their preferred learning style, identify effective
    study strategies and choose strategies to implement immediate academic
    success.
    B. Students will employ the Cornell Note-Taking method during lectures and
    determine usefulness of method in other classes.
    C. Students will create flash cards and discuss effectiveness of using flash
    cards in studying.
    D. Students will understand the importance of review in studying and preparing
    for exams.
    E. Students will distinguish successful test preparation strategies that occur
    before, during and after a test.
    F. Students will demonstrate process of elimination strategy during a multiple
    choice test, and number/answer estimation during a math test.
    G. Students will examine test anxiety and strategize ways to prepare
    cognitively, physically and logistically in order to minimize anxiety.

    Component 2 – Exhibiting Cultural Know-How

    A. Students will examine their internal physiological response to stress and
    practice communication skills for engaging in meaningful conversation.

    Component 3 – Balancing Multiple Roles and Time Demands

    A. Students will examine Pierce College’s mission, vision and values and
    identify strong personal values.
    B. Students will articulate a goal that is specific, measurable, attainable,
    relevant and time-bound.
    C. Students will evaluate their use of time, what their needs are and how their
    needs are being met.
    D. Students will identify ways to prioritize time and energy to pursue goals.
    E. Students will examine and describe personal strengths to increase confidence
    and motivation.
    F. Students will understand the effect of behaviors and thoughts on the brain
    and the development of unconscious habits.
    G. Students will identify negative self-talk and implement positive self-talk
    to improve attitude, self-image and performance.

    Component 4 – Help-Seeking Behavior

    A. Students will identify unmet needs and seek assistance using college and
    community resources.
    B. Students will demonstrate problem solving skills to address barriers to
    success.

    Sub-outcomes for all writing activities:

    A. Students will determine purpose and use prior knowledge when generating
    ideas for writing activities.
    B. Students will convey ideas in writing using proper syntax, grammar, and
    sentence structure.
  
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    ESL 098 Transitions to College (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Completion of ABE Level 3, ESL Level 4, current CASAS appraisal, or instructor approval.

    Course Description
    A course designed to assist Basic Skills students in preparing to transition to college programs. Students develop a personal plan, complete the initial steps toward college entrance, and develop skills for success.

  
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    ESL 099 I-Best Academic Support - ESL (1 to 20 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Reading Score of 211 or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A high intermediate-level ESL course for second language students who are currently working or preparing to work in a specific job area and are enrolled in an I-BEST program. The course integrates reading, writing, listening, speaking, and math skills with the linguistic requirements of the job. The content of this course varies each time it is offered. It may include English language skills for specific content areas such as certification for childcare workers, English Language Skills for Health Services, etc.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read with understanding in order to perform competently in a chosen career pathway.
    a) Recognize unfamiliar and specialized words, acronyms, and abbreviations related to a chosen career pathway.
    b) Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and career specific vocabulary in order to comprehend authentic career pathway materials.
    c) Locate important information in career-specific texts using a wide range of strategies.
    d) Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace in order to comprehend behaviorally career specific reports, evaluations, and rules and safety procedures.
    e) Use strategies such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing, simple categorization, and conversion into charts, lists, and notes in order to organize career specific text information.
    f) Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in corrections and protection officer related documents and procedures.

    2. Convey ideas in writing in order to perform competently in a chosen career
    pathway.
    a) Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing in order to perform the required job duties.
    b) Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose and produce legible, grammatically correct, and comprehensible job career documents.
    c) Appropriately use both everyday and specialized job specific vocabulary and well-constructed and linked paragraphs to accomplish career specific written communication documents.
    d) Use several simple revision strategies to monitor writing, to make revisions based on review and feedback from others, and to produce required career specific documents.
    e) Make edits of grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure with the help of tools such as vocabulary lists, dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers to produce accurate records and reports.

    3. Speak so others can understand in order to perform competently in an identified career pathway.
    a. Recall and use sufficient career specific vocabulary, grammar, sentence types, and registers in order to communicate effectively in the workplace.
    b. Select from a range of strategies (such as elaborating with some detail and examples; determining most important/right amount of information and content to convey) to select, organize, and relay key information related to a chosen career.
    c. Apply a range of strategies (including attention to appropriate register, repetition of information, adjustments in pace, tone, volume, eye contact, and body language based on listener’s response and needs) to monitor and enhance effectiveness of communication with customers, community members, and co-workers.

    4. Listen actively in order to perform competently in a chosen career pathway.
    a. Adapt response to varied speakers and contexts when language is not adjusted for English language learners in order to understand and respond appropriately to extended career-related explanations and narratives, detailed instructions, and complex conversations.
    b. Effectively use a wide range of strategies to repair gaps in understanding and give feedback in order to understand procedures and concepts that affect career specific practices.
    c. Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as comparing, integrating, and categorizing information for others) to understand fully the literal and implied intent of the speaker and to respond appropriately.

    5. Use math to solve problems and communicate in order to function competently in an identified career pathway.
    a. Recall and use mathematical procedures appropriately in order to provide accurate information on charts and reports.
    b. Define, select, and organize a variety of common mathematical data and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use appropriate procedures effectively to monitor, chart, and report.
    c. Communicate solutions to problems orally, with visual representations, in writing, by entries in a table or appropriate graph, chart, or with basic statistics.

    6. Develop an Educational/Career Plan in order to secure the desired Corrections or Protection Officer job.
    a. Set career and educational goals as they relate to roles in an identified career pathway and report progress on these goals and revise and update them on a regular basis.

    7. Technology:
    a. Knowledge and Concepts:
    Describe what s/he is able to do with technology using appropriate technological vocabulary.
    Acquire and use the internet vocabulary, such as search engines, web sites, and URLs.
    Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the connection of computers through the internet.
    Begin to apply critical thinking principles, such as separating fact from opinion, drawing conclusions, and
    predicting outcomes to sources retrieved from a computer.
    b. Resource Gatherings:
    Begin to recognize and seek assistance for common technical problems, such as a frozen screen, virus
    warning, and other warnings.
    Perform basic search of the internet with teacher/peer assistance.
    c. Applied Proficiency:
    Use word processing to compose and revise a document, such as business letter or report, with minimal
    errors.
    Use multiple common software, such as spreadsheets, graphics, and multimedia programs.
    Use basic functions of the internet, such as the location bar, back and forward buttons, and bookmarks.
    Use functions of email (compose, send, forward, delete, save) to increase written fluency.

English Corequisite

  
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    ENGLC 101 Corequisite English Composition (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Elective
    Course Description
    This course offers corequisite support for ENGL&101, providing students with extended instruction in college-level composition. Concepts include reading and writing processes, rhetorical situations, metacognition, and information competency, and academic support services.

    Student Outcomes
    Identify reading process strategies and apply these strategies to one’s composition work.
    Identify writing process strategies and apply these strategies to one’s composition work.
    Analyze how compositions are shaped by rhetorical situations, including purpose, audience, and context.
    Use digital tools within their reading, writing and research processes to produce complex, edited, and sharable work.
    Demonstrate critical self-reflection skills within the context of developing one’s own writing.
    Describe how linguistic diversity relates to a writer’s rhetorical choices and writing for specific communities and apply this knowledge to a variety of rhetorical situations.
    Apply information gained in working with peers, course instructor, and academic support services, including but not limited to Writing Center tutors and librarians, to one’s own reading and writing processes.

Environmental Science

  
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    ENVS 140 Western Water Problems (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENVIR 140

    Course Description
    Historical and contemporary exploration of the water resource and issues in the Western United States.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe the physical and chemical properties of water.
    2.Diagram the hydrologic cycle and the movement of water and energy with it.
    3.Explain biogeochemical cycles as interactive systems.
    4.Describe the relationship between the weather and climate of the Western U.S. and the location and distribution of water resources and natural hazards.
    5.Describe the relationship between the major geographic regions of the Western U.S. and the location and distribution of water resources.
    6.Diagram the major components of a watershed.
    7.Diagram and explain the major components of groundwater resources.
    8.Summarize the historical development of water resources in the Western U.S. for agriculture, industry, and urban growth.
    9.Analyze federal water policy, water rights, and water law as they apply to the Western U.S.
    10.Use the scientific method to describe the major components of studying and solving water resource problems.
    11.Analyze the major contemporary issues in water allocation, use, and misuse in the Western U.S.
    12.Distinguish between water needs of the different water basins.
    13.Examine different water basins in order to compare their ecological diversity.
    14.Design a set of criteria for a regional water use plan.
    15.Interpret topographic maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery for water resource studies.
    16.Evaluate water resources using hydrographs, climographs, snowpack and streamflow charts, and other statistical graphics.
    17.Discuss and summarize the major local water issues in Western Washington.
    18.Locate and analyze water resource data and information using the library and Internet as research tools.
    19.Responsibility: Recognize Interconnectedness. See self as part of more extended humankind and global community. Describe self and others in relation to environment, animal kingdom (biotic and abiotic), society, etc.
    20.Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Conclusions and Judgments. Combine some aspects of experience, reason, and information to make conclusions and judgments with some success. (e.g. predict the effect that extremely high tides and extremely low tides have upon organisms of the intertidal community)
    21.Information Competency: Evaluates Sources and Uses Tools. Evaluate and selectively use most appropriate tools and sources to access and manipulate geologic information, including library research, the Internet, and field research.
  
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    ENVS 150 Environmental Issues (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENVIR 150

    Course Description
    An interdisciplinary investigation of topics of environmental concern covering a wide range of local, national, and international case studies.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Recognize the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues and problem solving.
    2.Summarize the history of environmentalism.
    3.Examine the rights of future generations.
    4.Analyze the human philosophical traditions and the relationship between humans, animals, and the natural environment.
    5.Discuss the impact that philosophy, religion, art, media, and popular culture have had on people’s thinking about the environment.
    6.Discuss the value of wilderness and biodiversity.
    7.Summarize the application of ethics to environmental issues, including deforestation, pollution, population growth, resource consumption, the production and use of energy, and environmental sustainability.
    8.Compare the environmental impacts and risks of economic development in developed nations and in developing nations.
    9.Compare government and corporate responsibility for the environment.
    10.Debate a variety of environmental issues from both “pro” and “con” viewpoints.
    11.Evaluate the political processes required to attempt any solution to environmental degradation issues at the local, national, and international level.
    12.Identify specific environmental problems and risks, and evaluate their significance in terms of present and future impact on the biosphere.
    13.Assess the use of multidisciplinary solutions to alleviate or modify human impacts on the environment.
    14.Summarize the major environmental laws and their impact on environmental protection.
    15.Access environmental data and information from various sources including library research and the Internet.
    16.Information Competency: Demonstrate the ability to use the library and the Internet resource tools for locating and analyzing environmental data and information.
    17.Effective Communication: Ability to do field observation and make field notes of local animal and plant communities and formulate the data gathered into concise reports and presentations.
    18.Multiculturalism: Understand, appreciate, and discuss the different environmental viewpoints of various world cultures.
  
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    ENVS 155 Applied Environmental Methods (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Environmental science course involving field work in regional parks and natural areas as well as field trips to area restoration sites. Topics will cover Pacific Northwest ecosystems, restoration ecology, native and invasive species of plants and animals - including adaptations to their environment, water quality, ecology, and biogeography. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trips required. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Define environmental sustainability and explain why it is an important concern.
    2.Apply the Scientific Method to solve environmental problems.
    3.Define ecology, explain symbiosis, and distinguish the various trophic levels.
    4.Describe a biome and describe the major terrestrial biomes in relation to natural vegetation and climate.
    5.Summarize the roles of the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere within the Earth system and relate each to the biosphere.
    6.Explain the bio-geo-chemical cycles and summarize the flow of energy in an ecosystem and a food web.
    7.Discuss the role of solar energy from the global to micro scale.
    8.Define restoration ecology and recognize the interdisciplinary nature of environmental problems.
    9.Identify environmentally damaged sites and develop an action plan in terms of present and future impacts on the biosphere.
    10.Access environmental data and information from various sources including library and internet research.
    11.Describe the physical and chemical properties of water.
    12.Diagram the hydrologic cycle and the movement of water and energy within it.
    13.Recognize and define the differences between native and invasive species, and be skilled at methods for scientific identification of both.
    14.Explain the harmful, and sometimes beneficial, aspects of invasive species.
    15.Identify appropriate methods for removal/control of invasive species in specific situations.
    16.Compare the environmental impacts and risks of economic development.
    17.Utilize geographic tools such as Geographic Information Systems, topographic maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery to analyze restoration sites.
    18.Use GPS technology to map invasive species distribution on a site.
    19.Recognize the interdisciplinary nature of environmental issues and problem solving.
    20.Analyze philosophical traditions and relationships between humans, animals, and the natural environment.
    21.Discuss the value of wilderness and biodiversity.
    22.Effective Communication: Demonstrate the ability to do field observation and make field notes of local animal and plant communities and formulate the data gathered into concise reports and presentations.
    23.Responsibility: Interconnectedness. See self as part of more extended humankind and global community. Describes self and others in relation to environment (biotic and abiotic), animal kingdom, society, etc.
    24.Information Competency: Demonstrate the ability to use the library and the Internet as resources for locating and analyzing environmental data and information.
    25.Critical, Creative, and Reflective thinking: Integrate and analyze quantitative data and qualitative information and ideas in several contexts. Examine assumptions integrate experience, reason, and information to draw scientific conclusions.
  
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    ENVS 180 Seminar in Sustainability (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This seminar is an interdisciplinary approach to studying sustainability led by faculty from diverse disciplines. The course will examine and explore the three core dimensions of sustainability (environment, economy, and society) with respect to one or more major sustainability-related issues. Students will complete assigned readings and participate in weekly seminars. Throughout the quarter, students may be required to participate in various sustainability-related activities: watching films and online lectures, listening to speakers, attending field trips, and other events. The course will be presented with a different focus each time and may be taken twice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Students will explain what sustainability is and how the concept relates to environmental, social, political, and economic factors.
    2. Students will identify different important issues related to sustainability, such as resource depletion, resource conflict, pollution, consumerism, health, food systems, and energy systems.
    3. Students will engage in analytical and systems thinking to discuss and explain the key factors affecting specific sustainability-related issues.
    4. Students will reflect on how different aspects of sustainability relate to their daily lives and experience.
    5. Students will reflect on how different aspects of sustainability relate to the well-being of communities at the local, national, and global scale.
    6. Students will articulate ways in which individual and community action can play a role in creating sustainable systems.
    7. Students will reflect on their own personal role in creating and participating in sustainable practices.
  
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    ENVS& 100 Survey of Environmental Science (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENVIR 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    An introductory non-lab science course involving the analysis of environmental concepts and issues covering ecosystems, pollution, population, urbanization, natural resources, climate change, and other environmental issues. Field trip recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define environmental science and explain why environmental sustainability is an important concern.
    2. Summarize the history of environmentalism and the progress made in environmental awareness and cleanup.
    3. Using the scientific method, describe the major components of solving environmental problems.
    4. Explain how risk assessment helps determine pollution and natural hazard events and long-term effects.
    5. Distinguish between the major federal environmental laws (e.g. Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, NEPA, Endangered Species Act, etc).
    6. Assess the role of economics in relation to pollution, enjoyment, and value of environmental components.
    7. Differentiate the biogeochemical cycles and summarize the flow of energy in an ecosystem and a food web.
    8. Discuss the role of solar energy in the Earth system.
    9. Summarize the roles of the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere within the Earth system and relate each to the biosphere.
    10. Relate the role of humans to natural hazards in the environment.
    11. Define ecology, explain symbiosis, and distinguish the various ecological levels
    12. Sketch and explain the pyramids of numbers, biomass, and energy.
    13. Define a biome and describe the major terrestrial biomes in relation to natural vegetation and climate.
    14. Give examples of how water conservation can be practiced by industry, agriculture, and homes. Contrast the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing surface water and groundwater resources.
    15. List and describe at least five categories of water pollutants and air pollutants.
    16. Describe the distribution, growth, and dynamics of the world human population and analyze the impact of the human population on the environment.
    17. Information Competency: Demonstrate the ability to use the library and the Internet as resource tools for locating and analyzing environmental data and information.
    18. Effective Communication: Ability to do field observation and make field notes of local animal and plant communities and formulate the data gathered into concise reports and presentations.
    19. Multiculturalism: Understand, appreciate, and discuss the different environmental viewpoints of various world cultures.
    20. Responsibility: Examine the relationship between self and the environment, evaluate potential impacts of actions, and make choices based on that examination and evaluation.

Fire Service Leadership and Management

  
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    FSLM 120 Basic Fire Investigation (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Explores a basic study of fire scene investigation procedures and techniques used to determine the origin and cause of fire. Included are reasons for accurately determining the origin and cause of fire, the systematic approach to fire scene examination, the chemistry of fire, determining the origin, major accidental and incendiary fire causes, scene sketching, scene photography and note taking. Other topics that will be covered are: basic scene security, major fire scene control, report writing, interviewing, and courtroom demeanor for the firefighter and investigator.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the responsibilities of the fire department from a firefighter’s perspective when responding to the scene of a fire; including the possibility of incendiary devices often encountered.
    2. Define criminal law and explain the constitutional amendments as they apply to fire investigation.
    3. Define and explain common terms used in fire investigations.
    4. Describe the basic elements of fire dynamics and how they affect cause determination including fire behavior, characteristics of fuels and methods of heat transfer.
    5. Analyze the relationship of building construction on fire investigations including types of construction, construction and finish materials.
    6. Evaluate fire protection systems and building services and discuss how their installation affects the ignition of fire buildings.
    7. Explain the role of the fire investigator in recognizing health and safety concerns that includes potential hazardous material awareness.
    8. Describe fire scene investigations and the process of conducting investigations using the scientific method.
    9. Explain how an investigator determines the point of origin in a room.
    10. Identify the types of fire causes and differentiate between accidental and incendiary causes.
    11. Describe and explain the basic procedures used for investigating vehicle fires.
    12. Identify the characteristics of arson and common motives of the firesetter.
    13. Identify and analyze the causes involved in line of duty firefighter deaths related to structural and wildland firefighting, training and research and the reduction of emergency risks and accidents.
    14. Identify information about the role, use, and varied types of personal protective equipment (PPE) in the emergency response.
  
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    FSLM 137 Fire Protection Systems (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the benefits of fire protection systems in various types of structures.
    2. Describe the basic elements of a public water supply system including sources, distribution networks, piping and hydrants.
    3. Explain why water is a commonly used extinguishing agent.
    4. Identify the different types and components of sprinkler, standpipe and foam systems.
    5. Review residential and commercial sprinkler legislation.
    6. Identify the different types of non-water-based fire suppression systems.
    7. Explain the basic components of a fire alarm system.
    8. Identify the different types of detectors and explain how they detect fire.
    9. Describe the hazards of smoke and list the four factors that can influence smoke movement in a building.
    10. Discuss the appropriate application of fire protection systems.
    11. Explain the operation and appropriate application for the different types of portable fire protection systems.
  
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    FSLM 152 Building Construction for Fire Protection (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, buildings codes, fire prevention, code inspection, firefighting strategy, and tactics.
    2. Classify major types of building construction in accordance with a local/model building code.
    3. Analyze the hazards and tactical considerations associated with the various types of building construction.
    4. Explain the different loads and stresses that are placed on a building and their interrelationships.
    5. Identify the function of each principle structural component in typical building design.
    6. Differentiate between fire resistance, flame spread, and describe the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each.
    7. Classify occupancy designations of the building code.
    8. Identify the indicators of potential structural failure as they relate to firefighter safety.
    9. Identify the role of GIS as it relates to building construction.
  
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    FSLM 155 Fire Instructor I (4 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to a fire instructor’s duties as written by the requirements of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 1041, Standard for Fire Service Instructor Qualifications. Students examine a basic study of elements that influence teaching and learning. Special attention is given to the Fire Service Training Instructor’s relationship to student safety as well as the legal liabilities involved. Instruction will include discussion of techniques for preparing effective lessons using the psychology of learning. Other topics include: training aids, copyright law, learning theories, purposes and principles of testing and evaluation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the obligations facing fire service instructors as they pertain to students, the organization, professionally and to themselves.
    2. Identify and analyze safety and the training function.
    3. Recognize legal and ethical considerations as they apply to fire and emergency service organizations.
    4. Examine and apply the principles and techniques of effective oral and written communications.
    5. Examine requirements and factors that effect instructional facilities, training props and acquired structures that can be used to provide training required by the organization.
    6. Recognize the general concepts of report writing and the process for record keeping within the training division and organization.
    7. Summarize teaching methodology and the basic principles of learning.
    8. Examine student characteristics as they apply to their learning needs and learning styles.
    9. Examine the different aspects in instructional preparation to ensure that the learning experience is worthwhile, relevant and interesting.
    10. Identify various instructional delivery methods and their effect on active learning.
    11. Recognize the various benefits and types of audiovisual technology that is used for instructional delivery.
    12. Interpret the use of the Application step in lesson planning as it pertains to structured exercises, demonstration and practical training evolutions.
    13. Examine the evaluation process as it pertains to student progress.
  
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    FSLM 160 Fire Protection Strategies and Tactics (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides principles of ground control through utilization of personnel, equipment and extinguishing agents.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze fire behavior as it relates to strategies and tactics.
    2. Analyze the main components of pre-fire planning and the steps needed for a pre-fire plan review.
    3. Identify the basics of building construction and how they interrelate to pre-fire planning, strategies, and tactics.
    4. Apply the steps taken during size-up.
    5. Examine the significance of fire ground communications.
    6. Evaluate the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) as they relate to strategies and tactics.
    7. Summarize the various roles and responsibilities in ICS/NIMS.
  
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    FSLM 170 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and solve water supply problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the concepts of mathematics and physics to the movement of water in fire suppression activities.
    2. Explain the design principles of fire service pumping apparatus.
    3. Analyze community fire flow demand criteria.
    4. Explain the principles of forces that affect water, both at rest and in motion. 
    5. Compare the various types of water distribution systems.
    6. Discuss the various types of fire pumps.
    7.Evaluate water hydraulic principles as they relate to fire protection.
    8. Demonstrate knowledge of water hydraulics as it relates to fire protection.
  
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    FSLM 180 Fire and Emergency Services Administration (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service ethics and leadership from the perspective of the company officer.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Acknowledge career development opportunities and strategies for success.
    2. Recognize the need for effective communication skills, both written and verbal.
    3. Identify and explain the concepts of span and control, effective delegation, and division of labor.
    4. Select and implement the appropriate disciplinary action based upon an employee’s conduct.
    5. Explain the history of management and supervision methods and procedures.
    6. Discuss the various levels of leadership, roles, and responsibilities within the organization.
    7. Describe the traits of effective versus ineffective management styles.
    8. Identify the importance of ethics as it relates to fire and emergency services.
    9. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Management System (ICS).
  
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    FSLM 195 Fire Officer I (4 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to a fire officer’s duties as written by the requirements of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Content includes leadership, supervisory and decision making practices, legal responsibilities, communication practices, report writing, workplace safety, quality assurance and pre-incident planning.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine the responsibilities and duties of a company officer.
    2. Identify and examine various leadership theories and models, types of power, supervisory methods and management skills as they apply to emergency and non emergency functions.
    3. Distinguish between supervision and management.
    4. Distinguish between logic and ethics and their role in the decision-making process.
    5. Examine the basic concepts of the legal responsibilities and liabilities facing fire service, including the sources and classifications of laws and the difference between criminal and civil law.
    6. Apply the principles and techniques of effective oral and written communications.
    7. Examine various administrative functions that include customer service, policies and procedures and budgets and the impact they have on the operation of an organization.
    8. Examine the need for information collection, processing, dissemination and use from both the administrative and technical aspects.
    9. Recognize common causes of personal injuries and accidents and basic workplace safety.
    10. Evaluate the basic principles of organizational structure, purposes and classifications of fire and emergency services organizations and how organizations are staffed.
    11. Identify various methods of training and the role of a company officer in the training process.
    12. Explain planning function, elements of human resources policy management and behavior management.
    13. Examine different components of labor/management relations.
  
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    FSLM 205 Safety and Survival (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and describe the need for cultural and behavioral change within the emergency services relating to safety, incorporating leadership, supervision, accountability and personal responsibility.
    2. Explain the need for enhancements of personal and organizational accountability for health and safety.
    3. Define how the concepts of risk management affect strategic and tactical decision-making.
    4. Describe and evaluate circumstances that might constitute an unsafe act.
    5. Explain the concept of empowering all emergency services personnel to stop unsafe acts.
    6. Validate the need for national training standards as they correlate to professional development inclusive of qualifications, certifications, and re-certifications.
    7. Defend the need for annual medical evaluations and the establishment of physical fitness criteria for emergency services personnel throughout their careers.
    8. Explain the vital role of local departments in national research and data collection systems.
    9. Illustrate how technological advancements can produce higher levels of emergency services safety and survival.
    10. Explain the importance of investigating all near-misses, injuries and fatalities.
    11. Discuss how incorporating the lessons learned from investigations can support cultural change throughout the emergency services.
    12. Describe how obtaining grants can support safety and survival initiatives.
    13. Formulate an awareness of how adopting standardized policies for responding to emergency scenes can minimize near-misses, injuries and deaths.
    14. Explain how the increase in violent incidents impacts safety for emergency services personnel when responding to emergency scenes.
    15. Recognize the need for counseling and psychological support for emergency services personnel, their families, as well as, identify access to local resources and services.
    16. Describe the importance of public education as a critical component of life safety programs.
    17. Discuss the importance of fire sprinklers and code enforcement.
    18. Explain the importance of safety in the design of apparatus and equipment.
  
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    FSLM 255 Fire Instructor II (3 credits)



    Prerequisite FSLM 155  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Builds and expands on the skills learned in Fire Instructor I. This course is designed to provide the Fire Instructor with the next level of understanding for the training of personnel. This course is designed to train the participants to perform job and task analysis, develop goals and objectives, and develop a lesson plan along with the coordinating of training aids and student test and evaluation. Prepares the student for the requirements as written by the National Fire Protection Administration, (NFPA) 1041, Standard for Fire Service Instructor Qualifications.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze the parts and components of a lesson plan.
    2. List guidelines for instructor formal and informal evaluations.
    3. Distinguish between summative and formative evaluation.
    4. Develop a course/lesson evaluation instrument.
    5. Determine statistical usage of course evaluation results.
    6. Examine facts about preparing test specifications.
    7. List and explain the three basic types of test instruments.
    8. Distinguish among the Incident Command System (ICS) functions.
    9. Discuss implementation, supervision, and evaluation of practical training evolutions.
    10. Identify facts about data collection and information types.
    11. Distinguish between characteristics of capital budgets and operating budgets.
    12. List and explain characteristics of an effective purchasing process.
    13. Describe methods of anticipating, mitigating, and solving personnel problems.
    14. Analyze skills and job duties of training supervision.
    15. Evaluate factors that influence scheduling.
    16. Identify components and functions of a records-management system.
    17. Distinguish among policies, procedures and guidelines.
  
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    FSLM 262 Disaster Planning (4 credits)



    Course Description
    This course examines concepts and principles of community risk assessment, planning, and response to fires and natural and human-caused disasters, including the National Incident Management System–Incident Command Systems (NIMS ICS), mutual aid and automatic response, training and preparedness, communications, civil disturbances, terrorist threats/incidents, hazardous materials planning, mass casualty incidents, earthquake preparedness, and disaster mitigation and recovery.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the importance of disaster planning, preparation, and mitigation.
    2. Evaluate the hazard assessment processes and the role of the firefighter in community disaster planning and recovery.
    3. Assess hazard response and planning procedures.
    4. Define the impact of hazard occurrence on community response.
    5. Define the parameters and effectiveness of an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and its components.
    6. Differentiate the multilevel agency responsibilities in disaster mitigation.
    7. Define the relationships between disaster planning, mitigation, and recovery.
  
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    FSLM 265 Fire Officer II (4 credits)



    Prerequisite FSLM 195  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to a fire officer’s duties as written by the requirements of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Content includes interaction with government agencies, report writing, managing human resource, RMS, budgets, performance appraisal and exposure reports.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine management theories.
    2. Discuss functions of management and skills of an effective manager.
    3. Analyze types of local, state and federal governments and their effect on fire and emergency services organizations.
    4. Examine interagency and intergovernmental cooperation and their effect on mutual aid, multiagency and multijurisdictional incident response and cooperation.
    5. Identify the types of analysis and the steps in the analysis process.
    6. Evaluate the principles of supervising personnel as it applies to group dynamics, evaluation and counseling.
    7. Recognize and apply the principles of policy and procedure development, budget development and purchasing activities.
    8. Interpret community risk analysis as it applies to a fire and life safety inspection program.
    9. Analyze basic fire investigation and motive/methods used by arsonist.
    10. Evaluate the basic principles of operational plan development and the advanced organization of the Incident Management System (IMS).
    11. Examine Post Incident Analysis (PIA) and the process for developing it and how it is used in post incident critique.
    12. Recognize and understand initiatives in safety investigation and analysis.
  
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    FSLM 272 Personnel Management (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Elective
    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire and emergency services department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasis is placed on fire and emergency service ethics and leadership.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify career development opportunities and strategies for success.
    2. Recognize the need for effective communication skills, both written and verbal.
    3. Identify and explain the concepts of span and control, effective delegation, and division of labor.
    4. Implement the appropriate disciplinary action based upon an employee's conduct.
    5. Explain the history of management and supervision methods and procedures.
    6. Discuss the various levels of leadership, roles, and responsibilities within the organization.
    7. Describe the traits of effective versus ineffective management styles.
    8. Explore the importance of ethics as it relates to fire and emergency services.
    9. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Management System (ICS).
  
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    FSLM 273 Principles of Emergency Services (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Illustrate and explain the history and culture of the fire service.
    2. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical chain reaction, the major phases of fire, and examine the main factors that influence fire spread and fire behavior.
    3. Differentiate between fire service training and education and explain the value of higher education to the professionalization of the fire service.
    4. List and describe the major organizations that provide emergency response service and illustrate how they interrelate.
    5. Identify fire protection and emergency-service careers in both the public and private sector.
    6. Define the role of national, State and local support organizations in fire and emergency services.
    7. Discuss and describe the scope, purpose, and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
    8. Describe the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment, and apparatus.
    9. Compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.
    10. Identify the primary responsibilities of fire prevention personnel including, code enforcement, public information, and public and private protection systems.
    11. Recognize the components of career preparation and goal setting.
    12. Describe the importance of wellness and fitness as it relates to emergency services.
  
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    FSLM 274 Safety and Health (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Elective
    Prerequisite none.

    Course Description
    This course introduces the basic concepts of occupational health and safety as it relates to emergency service organizations. Topics include risk and hazard evaluation and control procedures for emergency service organizations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the history of occupational health and safety.
    2. Identify occupational health and safety programs for industry and emergency services today.
    3. Compare the difference between standards and regulations.
    4. Describe the components of risk identification, risk evaluation, and incident management.
    5. Describe the relevance for safety in the work place, including the importance of PPE.
    6. Apply the knowledge of an effective safety plan to pre-incident planning, response, and training activities.
    7. Explain the components of an accountability system in emergency service operations.
    8. Discuss the need for, and the process used for, post-incident analysis.
    9. Describe the components and value of critical incident management programs.
    10. Describe the responsibilities of individual responders, supervisors, Safety Officers, and Incident Commanders, safety program managers, safety committees, and fire department managers as they relate to health and safety programs.
    11. Describe the components of a wellness/fitness plan.
    12. Analyze the major causes involved in line-of-duty firefighter deaths related to health, wellness, fitness, and vehicle operations.
  
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    FSLM 276 Fire Behavior & Combustion (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify physical properties of the three states of matter.
    2. Categorize the components of fire.
    3. Explain the physical and chemical properties of fire.
    4. Describe and apply the process of burning.
    5. Define and use basic terms and concepts associated with the chemistry and dynamics of fire.
    6. Discuss various materials and their relationship to fires as fuel.
    7. Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of water as a fire suppression agent.
    8. Articulate other suppression agents and strategies.
    9. Compare other methods and techniques of fire extinguishments.
  
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    FSLM 277 Incident Safety Officer (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the duties as written by the requirements of the National Fire Protection Administration (NFPA) 1521, Standard for Fire Department Safety Officer, 2002 edition. Course elements are designed to enable the student to identify and analyze health and safety aspects relating to their role as Incident Safety Officer in both emergency and non-emergency situations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine the safety officer role in fire departments.
    2. Identify and explain the five parts of classic risk management.
    3. Distinguish among the differences in regulations, codes, laws and guides.
    4. Discuss the reasoning for preplanning the response of an incident safety officer.
    5. Identify and describe the three areas that help perform the functions of the ISO.
    6. List in order, the five-step analytical approach to predicting building collapse.
    7. List the four attributes of smoke.
    8. Identify the three steps in the reading of smoke process.
    9. Define situational awareness.
    10. Describe three methods to read risk at an incident.
    11. Define hazardous energy and list four ways to categorize its status.
    12. Define the four R’s of firefighter rehabilitation.
    13. Identify four methods that will help the ISO trigger safety behaviors.
    14. Identity and describe the four components of the ISO Action Model.
    15. Examine the three dimensions that need to be defined during environmental reconnaissance.
    16. Explain the three factors that influence fire spread.
    17. Examine the strategic goals for the safety section at a WMD/terrorist incident.
    18. Discuss several regulations that outline response requirements for tech-rescue incidents
  
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    FSLM 286 Fire Prevention (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the national fire problem and role of fire prevention.
    2. Identify and describe fire prevention organizations and associations.
    3. Define laws, rules, regulations, and codes and identify those relevant to fire prevention of the authority having jurisdiction.
    4. Define the functions of a fire prevention bureau.
    5. Describe inspection practices and procedures.
    6. Identify and describe the standards for professional qualifications for Fire Marshal, Plans Examiner, Fire Inspector, Fire and Life Safety Educator, and Fire Investigator.
    7. List opportunities in professional development for fire prevention personnel.
    8. Describe the history and philosophy of fire prevention.
  
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    FSLM 300 Fire Services Administration (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course is designed to be a progressive primer for students who want more knowledge about fire and emergency services administration. The course demonstrates the importance of the following skills that are necessary to manage and lead a fire and emergency services department through the challenges and changes of the 21st century: persuasion and influence, accountable budgeting, anticipation of challenges and the need for change, and using specific management tools for analyzing and solving problems. A central part of the course focuses on how the leadership of a fire and emergency services department develops internal and external cooperation to create a coordinated approach to achieving the department’s mission.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and discuss the elements of effective departmental organization.
    2. Classify what training and skills are needed to establish departmental organization.
    3. Analyze the value of a community-related approach to risk reduction.
    4. Outline the priorities of a budget-planning document, while anticipating the diverse needs of a community.
    5. Assess the importance of positively influencing community leaders by demonstrating effective leadership.
    6. Analyze the concept of change and the need to be aware of future trends in fire management.
    7. Report on the importance of communications technology, fire service networks, and the Internet when conducting problem-solving analysis and managing trends.
    8. Develop a clear understanding of the national assessment models and their respective approaches to certification.
  
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    FSLM 310 Fire Service Leadership (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines the effective application of leadership and organizational theory in the Fire Service. Emphasis will be on understanding the psychological and social factors affecting human work behavior and performance.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe leadership styles and the effective use of each style given individual capabilities and situations
    2. Develop and articulate philosophy of leadership.
    3. Identify how leadership styles may be affected by crisis and non-crisis situations in the fire service.
    4. Compare and contrast theories and describe how apply leadership theories to motivate self and others.
    5. Construct a change management model using data sets and metics that support the process of planning, communicating and implementing change.
    6. Demonstrate a range of skills addressing conflict management, use of power, group dynamics, leadership and influence.
    7. Describe causes of team dysfunction in the fire service and develop a mitigation plan.
    8. Develop a plan to mitigate fire service team dysfunctions.
    9. Demonstrate the application of various decision-making fire protection systems models and their application to the fire service.
  
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    FSLM 320 Political & Legal Foundations for Fire Protection (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines the legal aspects of the fire service and the political and social impacts of legal issues. This course includes a review of the American legal system and an in-depth coverage of legal and political issues involving employment and personnel matters, administrative and operational matters, planning and code enforcement, and legislative and political processes with regard to the fire service.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify potential legal and political issues in fire and emergency services.
    2. Describe legal lessons learned from recent cases, and identify best practices in the fire service to avoid legal liability.
    3. Analyze and apply legal rules and political issues to manage risk.
    4. Formulate political and legal conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis.
    5. Locate and apply recent legal and legislative online resources.
  
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    FSLM 330 Personnel Management for the Fire Service (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines relationships and issues in personnel administration and human resource development within the context of fire-related organizations, including personnel management, organizational development, productivity, recruitment and selection, performance management systems, discipline, and collective bargaining.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain contemporary personnel management issues.
    2. Explain potential personnel management issues.
    3. Classify the collective rules, procedures, laws, and policies that relate to personnel management issues.
    4. Analyze simple/complex personnel management issues from recruitment to selection, as well as retention.
    5. Formulate recommendations and solutions to personnel management issues.
    6. Explore organizational development and leadership styles and how they relate to personnel relationships
  
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    FSLM 350 Fire Service Ethics (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines the basic principles of ethics as related to fire service operations and management with special attention given to current issues in the fire service.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a value statement for your department.
    2. Devise and implement an ethics training program for your department.
    3. Review and revise minority recruitment strategies.
  
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    FSLM 360 Disaster Planning and Control (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines concepts and principles of community risk assessment, planning, and response to fires and natural and human-caused disasters, including the National Incident Management System–Incident Command Systems (NIMS ICS), mutual aid and automatic response, training and preparedness, communications, civil disturbances, terrorist threats/incidents, hazardous materials planning, mass casualty incidents, earthquake preparedness, and disaster mitigation and recovery.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the importance of disaster planning, preparation, and mitigation.
    2. Evaluate the hazard assessment processes and the role of the firefighter in community disaster planning and recovery.
    3. Assess hazard response and planning procedures.
    4. Define the impact of hazard occurrence on community response.
    5. Define the parameters and effectiveness of an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and its components.
    6. Differentiate the multilevel agency responsibilities in disaster mitigation.
    7. Define the relationships between disaster planning, mitigation, and recovery.
  
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    FSLM 370 Fire Related Human Behavior (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course presents a study of human behavior in fire and other emergency situations. Students will examine current and past research on human behavior, systems models, life safety education, and building design to determine the interactions of these areas in emergency situations. Students will develop an understanding of a best-practice building life safety system as one that combines knowledge in the areas of psychology and sociology, joined with engineering and education to produce the best possible outcomes in terms of human survivability in an emergency.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply knowledge to create a system that integrates human behavior factors into life safety planning and practice.
    2. Compare and contrast how psychology and sociology factors influence behavior.
    3. Demonstrate how current computer systems modeling functions.
    4. Locate and analyze current human-related fire research.
  
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    FSLM 400 Community Risk Reduction for the Fire Service (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course provides a theoretical framework for the understanding of the ethical, sociological, organizational, political, and legal components of community risk reduction, and a methodology for the development of a comprehensive community risk-reduction plan.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify ways to become advocates of risk reduction.
    2. Develop and meet community risk-reduction objectives.
    3. Identify and develop intervention strategies.
    4. Implement a risk-reduction program.
    5. Review and modify risk-reduction programs.
  
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    FSLM 410 Fire Prevention Organization and Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course empowers students with knowledge, methods, and concepts for effective leadership of comprehensive fire-prevention and risk-reduction programs.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the role of fire prevention in community risk reduction.
    2. Analyze code enforcement and plans review concepts.
    3. Analyze fire and life safety education concepts.
    4. Analyze methods for effective fire, arson, and explosion investigation
    5. Examine historical events and their influence on fire prevention.
    6. Examine social, cultural, and behavioral concepts that influence effective prevention programs.
    7. Identify and analyze local, state, and federal resources.
    8. Examine methods to enhance professional development of fire-prevention and other emergency service personnel
    9. Examine policies, procedures, and impacts of effective fire-prevention efforts.
    10. Analyze budgeting and program funding concepts.
  
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    FSLM 420 Fire Dynamics (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines the underlying principles involved in structural fire protection systems and building furnishings, as well as fire protection systems, including water-based fire suppression systems, fire alarm and detection systems, special hazard suppression systems, and smoke management systems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze building structural components for fire endurance and fire resistance.
    2. Explain the flame spread and smoke production properties of building furnishings and materials.
    3. Explain the importance of, and be able to calculate, heat release rate for combustibles.
  
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    FSLM 450 Applications of Fire Research (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admittance in the BAS-FSLM Program.

    Course Description
    This course examines the basic principles of research and methodology for analyzing current fire-related research. The course also provides a framework for conducting and evaluating independent research in the following areas: fire dynamics, fire test standards and codes, fire safety, fire modeling, structural fire safety, life safety, firefighter health and safety, automatic detection and suppression, transportation fire hazards, risk analysis and loss control, fire service applied research, and new trends in fire-related research.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Locate, evaluate, and analyze fire-related research.
    2. Demonstrate and apply the process of fire research to a research problem that is related to one of the course topics.
    3. Conduct a literature review of current research on a fire-related topic.
    4. Write a fire-related research proposal.
    5. Design a research plan using one or more qualitative and/or quantitative methodologies.

Geography

  
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    GEOG 100 Introduction to Geography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Introduction to Geography introduces the student to the basic principles, concepts, and methods used in geography. The course introduces students to the principles and practices of the science of geography. Students will study the basic concepts of the following sub-fields of geography. The Earth Science Tradition: cartography, physical geography, and the geography of natural resources. Culture-Environment Tradition: population geography, cultural geography, and geography of spatial behavior. The Locational Tradition: economic geography, urban geography, and the human impact on the environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Know and use geographic information by being able to create, interpret, and use maps and spatial data.
    2.Utilize geographic skills to analyze historical, cultural, economic, demographic, political, and environmental issues.
    3.Synthesize information and data to convey spatial relationships.
    4.Locate, map and describe major physical and human geographic features at the local, regional, national, and global levels.
    5.Apply spatial theories and concepts at both the small and large scale.
    6.Explain the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations in terms of physical, cultural, and economic factors and conflicts through formal and informal writing activities.
    7.Analyze the dynamic relationships between human and physical systems of the Earth.
    8.Articulate the influences of geographic features on the physical and cultural development of cities, nations, and regions.
    9.Utilize tools such as geographic information systems, spreadsheets, and statistical packages to analyze and represent spatial relationships.
    10.Articulate ways different multi-cultural perspectives impact how places are perceived, utilized, and transformed. “
    11.Articulate some fundamental relationships between the physical and cultural aspects of geography;
  
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    GEOG 120 Exploring Cities (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course broadly introduces students to the geography of cities. We will first explore how cities emerged into dense, highly networked environments of urban life. There will then be an emphasis on seeing cities through a variety of approaches – economic, social, political and cultural lenses – in order to develop a greater appreciation for the diverse factors that shape urban life. A field trip will be required.

    Student Outcomes
    1) Describe and apply concepts and theories about urban life, such as urbanization, central place theory and gentrification
    2) Describe different historical, cultural, political and economic forces that have influenced and shaped cities
    3) Describe spatial perspective of how certain populations are distributed across cities and metropolitan areas
    4) Investigate pressing urban issues in the local Seattle-Tacoma area
    5) Communicate research findings to a diverse audience
  
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    GEOG 150 Europe, the Americas and the South Pacific (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introduction to the rich variety of peoples, traditions, and landscapes in the geographic realms of Europe, Russia, North America, Middle America, South America, Australia, and the South Pacific. Emphasis on cultural evolution of these regions, as well as their interactions with the world and their environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Know and use geographic information by being able to create, interpret, and use maps and spatial data.
    2.Utilize geographic skills to analyze historical, cultural, economic, demographic, political, and environmental issues.
    3.Synthesize information and data to convey spatial relationships.
    4.Locate, map and describe major physical and human geographic features at the local, regional, national, and global levels.
    5.Apply spatial theories and concepts at both the small and large scale.
    6.Explain the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations in terms of physical, cultural, and economic factors and conflicts through formal and informal writing activities.
    7.Analyze the dynamic relationships between human and physical systems of the Earth.
    8.Articulate the influences of geographic features on the physical and cultural development of cities, nations, and regions.
    9.Utilize tools such as geographic information systems, spreadsheets, and statistical packages to analyze and represent spatial relationships.
    10.Articulate ways different multi-cultural perspectives impact how places are perceived, utilized, and transformed.
  
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    GEOG 160 Africa, Middle East, and Asia (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introduction to the rich variety of peoples, traditions, and landscapes in the geographic realms of Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa South West Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and South East Asia. Emphasis is on the origins and evolution of the diverse cultural heritages of these regions, their interactions with the world as a whole, and on present interaction between these peoples and their environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Know and use geographic information by being able to create, interpret, and use maps and spatial data.
    2.Utilize geographic skills to analyze historical, cultural, economic, demographic, political, and environmental issues.
    3.Synthesize information and data to convey spatial relationships.
    4.Locate, map and describe major physical and human geographic features at the local, regional, national, and global levels.
    5.Apply spatial theories and concepts at both the small and large scale.
    6.Explain the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations in terms of physical, cultural, and economic factors and conflicts through formal and informal writing activities.
    7.Analyze the dynamic relationships between human and physical systems of the Earth.
    8.Articulate the influences of geographic features on the physical and cultural development of cities, nations, and regions.
    9.Utilize tools such as geographic information systems, spreadsheets, and statistical packages to analyze and represent spatial relationships.
    10.Articulate ways different multi-cultural perspectives impact how places are perceived, utilized, and transformed.
  
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    GEOG 200 Human Geography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Introduces basic concepts in human geography relating to economic activities, landscapes, languages, migrations, nations, regions, and religions. Serves as the basis for further course work in geography.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Utilize geographic skills to analyze historical, cultural, economic, demographic, political, and environmental issues.
    2.Synthesize information and data to convey spatial relationships.
    3.Apply spatial theories and concepts at both the small and large scale.
    4.Explain the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations in terms of physical, cultural, and economic factors and conflicts through formal and informal writing activities.
    5.Utilize tools such as geographic information systems, spreadsheets, and statistical packages to analyze and represent spatial relationships.
    6.Articulate ways different multi-cultural perspectives impact how places are perceived, utilized, and transformed.
  
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    GEOG 205 Physical Geography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Physical geography will introduce you to climatology, the study of earth’s weather systems and weather patterns; geomorphology, the study of landforms their formation and change over time and biogeography, the study of natural vegetation types.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate some fundamental relationships between the physical and cultural aspects of geography.
    2. Determine the reasons for the spatial variation of solar radiation and how Earth’s climate is affected.
    3. Use and appraise some of the tools and methods geographers use, e.g., computer software that links component disciplines in data collection, analysis, and interpretation.
    4. Construct an atmospheric pressure pattern map of the world from existing data sets and explain how these patterns are generated and in turn affect other patterns related to climate, distribution of precipitation, plants, animals, and people.
    5. Describe significant fundamental relationships between climate, plate tectonics, rocks, and landforms as manifested in Earth’s stream patterns.
    6. Examine significant relationships between land, water, air, and ice as components of biogeochemical cycling on Earth;
    7. Identify sets of processes that govern Earth’s fundamental surface morphology.
    8. Identify the spatial distribution of geohazards, e.g., earthquakes, groundwater pollution, flooding, landslides, both spatially and temporally and the role of people’s activities.
  
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    GEOG 207 Economic Geography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The changing locations and spatial patterns of economic activity, including: production in agriculture, manufacturing, and services; spatial economic principles of trade, transportation, communications, and corporate organization; regional economic development, and the diffusion of technological innovation. Topics include international trade, colonialism, industrial capitalism, advanced capitalism, and the globalization of labor markets.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Recognize the need for sharply defined concepts and concisely articulated conceptualizations in the pursuits of topics and issues in the social sciences, in general, and economic geography
    2.Account for different ways in which time is an important dependent or independent variable in economic-geographic analyses and be able to articulate instances where time and space interact and constrain each other.
    3.Recognizes different kinds and levels of “complexities” in a regional economy and in the spatial facets of the economic composition of, and interdependencies within such an economy.
    4.Describe the effects of geographic scale on spatial processes: Is able to provide examples for principles and dynamic processes which apply (with or without modifications) at different geographic levels.
    5.Articulate some of the relationships between an economic actor and her/his decision environment which may be relatively simple or complex, certain or uncertain, local or global, placid or turbulent..
    6.Appreciate the diversity and complexity of the economies of cities and has some understanding of the way in which general principles of economic geography can be applied to urban economies, their functions and spatial structure.
    7.Recognize the importance of (access to) information sources and the need to evaluate critically the quality and reliability of such sources in light of the research question(s), the costs (including limitations) and benefits of that information and the information from alternative sources and (last not least) the possible availability of alternative conceptual frameworks and analytical methods with different information needs.
    8.Express how society and its economic actors organize themselves in space, how spatial, economic, institutional and other variables interact in the evolution of such organizational structures, and how organizational configurations in space have, in turn important implications for the economic and social well-being of affected groups and societies.
    9.Describe the relationships between technological change (including change in information technologies) and regional economic development.
    10.Characterize the complexity of economic development processes anywhere in the world, the difficulty of describing such processes and the impossibility of ever reaching a total agreement on how to explain such processes satisfactorily and fully.
  
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    GEOG 210 Physical Geography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The student will learn about the processes that produce natural physical landscapes and weather phenomena. The course should result in an enhanced appreciation of the landscapes of the world. Physical geography will introduce you to climatology, the science that deals with the study of earth’s weather systems and weather patterns, geomorphology, the science that deals with the study of landforms, their formation and change over time and biogeography, natural vegetation types and their distribution, as well as soils. Fulfills laboratory science credit at Pierce College.

    Student Outcomes
    1.”Articulate” some fundamental relationships between the physical and cultural aspects of geography;
    2.Determine the reasons for the spatial variation of solar radiation and how Earth’s climate is affected;
    3.Use and appraise some of the tools and methods geographers use, e.g., computer software that links component disciplines in data collection, analysis, and interpretation;
    4.Construct an atmospheric pressure pattern map of the world from existing data sets and explain how these patterns are generated and in turn affect other patterns related to climate, distribution of precipitation, plants, animals, and people;
    5. Describe significant fundamental relationships between climate, plate tectonics, rocks, and landforms as manifested in Earth’s stream patterns;
    6.Examine significant relationships between land, water, air, and ice as components of biogeochemical cycling on Earth;
    7.Identify sets of processes that govern Earth’s fundamental surface morphology;
    8.Identify the spatial distribution of geohazards, e.g., earthquakes, groundwater pollution, flooding, landslides, both spatially and temporally and the role of people’s activities.
  
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    GEOG 250 Introduction to Maps and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course broadly introduces students to the field of cartography – the production, interpretation and use of maps – and practical use of Geography Information Systems (GIS) applications. There are two emphases in the course: First, students will explore elements of map design, cartographic concepts like projections and scale, and how maps are used (and misused) in society. A second emphasis involves a basic introduction into relevant Geography Information Systems applications being used today, particularly ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Basic computer literacy skills are strongly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Students will be able to describe an understanding of cartographic principles such as scale, projection and coordinate systems.
    2.Students will be able to critically interpret maps through design choices such as symbolization, colors and the conundrum of necessary generalizations, all in terms of map production.
    3.Students will be able to find, download and interpret geospatial data from public databases.
    4.Students will be able to use basic functions of GIS software like ArcMap, including the creation of thematic maps.
    5.Students will be able to describe practical uses of GIS software in solving real-world problems related to fields like the environment, business and government.

Geology

  
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    GEOL 107 Exploring Earth Science (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introductory Earth Science course that covers essential topics in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. The focus is on the system connections and interrelationships between the four Earth Science disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on examples from the Pacific Northwest. Appropriate for non-science and science majors, and elementary education majors. May require field trip or project. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe and explain the earth’s place in space.
    2.Apply and convert measurements in the metric system.
    3.Identify and classify basic minerals and rocks from selected samples.
    4.Apply the scientific method to the theory of plate tectonics.
    5.Relate volcanoes, earthquakes and other geologic features to plate tectonics.
    6.Explain how the earth has changed through geologic history and the evidence that supports these changes.
    7.Describe the global ocean including its geologic setting, circulation, and coastal features and processes.
    8.Interpret different types of maps and apply the latitude and longitude system of location.
    9.Observe and measure weather elements, and summarize and analyze the data collected.
    10.Demonstrate how seasonal changes, weather systems, local influences, cloud types, and barometric pressure may be used to forecast weather.
    11.Explain how weather is affected by atmospheric circulation patterns, seasons, weather patterns, and local climate controls.
    12.Communicate an awareness of human and personal impact on earth systems.
    13.Seek, find, evaluate, and use data and information, obtained via library use and information technology, in learning Earth Science.
    14.Combine aspects of experience, reason, and information to make conclusions and judgments (e.g. relating the theory of plate tectonics to the distribution of volcanic and earthquake activity).
  
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    GEOL 112 Geohazards and Natural Disasters (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A study of the causes, impacts, and mitigation of natural disasters. Topics may include earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanism, floods, landslides, subsidence and expansive soils, coastal hazards, tornadoes and other severe weather, hurricanes and extratropical cyclones, wildfires, global climate change, and meteor impacts and space weather. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. May include optional field trip.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe Earth as a system that includes its solid, water, atmosphere, and life components and their interactions
    2. Evaluate the value of understanding natural hazards and hazard mitigation
    3. Apply the scientific method and relate scientific processes to Earth processes.
    4. Discuss plate tectonic processes and explain how they relate to geologic hazards
    5. Describe the origin, occurrence, monitoring, and mitigation of hazards related to plate tectonic processes and how these hazards may be linked to other natural hazards.
    6. Describe the origin, occurrence, monitoring, and mitigation of hazards related to the hydrologic cycle and how these hazards may be linked to other natural hazards.
    7. Evaluate the origin, effects, and mitigation of wildfire hazards and indicate the links to other natural hazards
    8. Evaluate Earth global climate changes throughout geologic time and relate this to anthropogenic global climate change and other natural hazards.
    9. Evaluate the political, social, and scientific aspects of global climate change hazard mitigation.
    10. Evaluate the probability, effects, and mitigation of meteor impact, airburst, and space weather hazards and indicate the links to other natural hazards.
    11. Integrate experience, reason, and information to draw scientific conclusions about natural hazards.
    12. Appropriately communicate geologic and environmental data to an audience through reports and presentations
    13. Evaluate and use appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic and environmental information including library research, the Internet, and field research
    14. Understand, appreciate, and discuss the different environmental viewpoints of various world cultures
    15. Examine the relationship between self and the environment, evaluate potential impacts of actions, and make choices based on that examination and evaluation
  
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    GEOL 283 Regional Geology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Study of the geologic formations, structures, and geologic history that create the landscapes of a selected region. Appropriate for non-science and science majors.

  
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    GEOL& 101 Introduction to Physical Geology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GEOL 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    A study of minerals, rocks, and dynamic processes that shape the Earth’s surface over time, such as tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, landslides, streams, and coasts. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trip required. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the scientific method to interpret geologic processes through time.
    2. Apply geologic principles and critical thinking skills to solve geologic problems such as sustainable development of resources.
    3. Describe physical characteristics of minerals and rocks and identify them in order to evaluate conditions under which earth materials form.
    4. Interpret maps and images in order to assess geologic processes and hazards.
    5. Select and utilize appropriate tools and sources in order to access and synthesize geologic and environmental information and communicate it effectively.
  
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    GEOL& 103 Historical Geology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GEOL 103 - CCN

    Course Description
    A study of the development and interactions of the Earth’s crust, life, oceans, and atmosphere through geologic time, in order to provide a perspective on present-day global environmental concerns. Includes studies of the formation and break-up of supercontinent; global climate change; fossil, dinosaur and other mass extinctions; and meteor impact effects. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trip required. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic relationships between the solid earth, water, atmosphere, and life of the earth through geologic time.
    2. Apply the scientific method and relate basic scientific concepts to geologic processes (e.g. plate tectonics or other examples).
    3. Identify common rock-forming and ore minerals.
    4. Explain the rock cycle and identify important igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.
    5. Describe sedimentary structures, depositional environments, and stratigraphic relationships.
    6. Apply the methods of relative and absolute dating of rocks and geologic events; reproduce the eras and periods of the geologic time scale.
    8. Describe the formation of fossils; discuss their use in correlation and determining sedimentary environments.
    9. Explain the mechanisms of biological evolution and supporting evidence.
    10. Describe plate tectonic processes and explain the physical evidence that supports plate tectonic theory.
    11. Discuss the formation of the universe, solar system, and planets, and discuss the supporting evidence.
    12. Explain the relationship between the development of the lithosphere, atmosphere, and oceans in the Archean Eon.
    13. Explain the origin and development of life in the Archean Eon.
    14. Relate the major geologic events of the Proterozoic Eon to plate tectonics and the development of life.
    15. Relate the development of life in the Proterozoic Eon to changes in the atmosphere and oceans.
    16. Discuss the relationship between tectonic events and sedimentation in the Paleozoic Era in North America; discuss changes in world plate configurations.
    17. Explain the development of life in the Paleozoic Era, including the acquisition of hard parts and the adaptations of animals and plants to life on land.
    18. Relate major world and North American geologic events of the Mesozoic Era to the break-up of Pangaea.
    19. Describe the rediversification of life in the Mesozoic Era following the Permian mass extinction; evaluate the current theories for Cretaceous mass extinction.
    20. Summarize the major geologic and climate events of North America and the world in the Tertiary Period.
    21. Describe glaciation and other important geologic events of North America and the world in the Quaternary Period; relate glacial ages to world climate changes.
    22. Describe the rediversification of life in the Cenozoic Era following the Cretaceous mass extinction, and relate this to the separation of land masses.
    23. Relate human lineages to primate classification; discuss the possible role of climate change in Australopithecus and Homo evolution.
    24. Discuss the role of modern humans in today’s world with respect to climate change, environmental degradation, and biodiversity.
    25. Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Conclusions and Judgments. Combine some aspects of experience, reason, and information to make conclusions and judgments (e.g. apply the principles of relative dating and fossil succession to determine the sequence of geologic events in a region).
    26. Information Competency: Evaluates Sources and Uses Tools. Evaluate and selectively use most appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic information, including library research, the Internet, and field research.
  
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    GEOL& 110 Environmental Geology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GEOL/ENVIR 105

    Course Description
    A study of the interaction of humans and the Earth, with emphasis on geologic hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic activity, landslides, and flooding; resources such as energy, water, and minerals; disposal of wastes and pollution. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trip required. Labs included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic relationships between the solid earth, water, atmosphere, and life on Earth through geologic time.
    2. Analyze the impact of population growth and human activities on the Earth’s systems (e.g. soil loss, water use, coastal development, natural resources)
    3. Apply the scientific method and relate basic scientific concepts to geologic processes (e.g. plate tectonics or other examples.
    4. Identify common rock-forming and ore minerals, and describe their importance to environmental geology.
    5. Explain the rock cycle and identify important igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; describe the importance of rocks to environmental geology.
    6. Discuss important plate tectonic processes and explain how they relate to geologic hazards and resources.
    7. Describe the origin, occurrence, and hazards of earthquakes; describe the difficulties in predicting earthquakes; evaluate the mitigation of earthquake hazards.
    8. Analyze the relationship between magmas, volcanic styles, plate tectonics, and the occurrence of volcanic hazards; evaluate the prediction and mitigation of volcanic hazards.
    9. Draw and describe the hydrologic cycle; relate stream dynamics and human land use to flood hazards; evaluate the prediction and mitigation of flooding hazards.
    10. Analyze the effects of coastal processes and human development on coastal hazards and erosion; evaluate mitigation strategies.
    11. Relate slope processes and human development to hazards from mass movement; evaluate preventive measures.
    12. Discuss groundwater and surface water resources.
    13. Relate weathering and soil formation to soil use and erosion problems.
    14. Explain the geographic origin, supply, extraction techniques, impacts of extraction, and mitigation of impacts of mineral resources.
    15. Discuss the geologic origin, supply, extraction techniques, impacts of extraction and use, and mitigation of impacts of energy resources. Compare the potential benefits of alternative energy sources.
    16. Assess the geologic and political aspects of solid, liquid, hazardous, and radioactive waste disposal.
    17. Evaluate human responsibility for sources and mitigation of water pollution.
    18. Discuss the main concepts of other relevant special topics in environmental geology as determined by the instructor (such as global climate change, air pollution, medical geology, environmental law, land-use planning and engineering geology, meteorite impacts).
    19. Interpret topographic maps, geologic maps, aerial photographs, and satellite imagery to understand geologic processes and solve geologic problems.
    20. Critical Thinking: Integrate and analyze quantitative data and qualitative information and ideas in several contexts. Examines assumptions; integrates experience, reason, and information to draw scientific conclusions. Examples: map and photo interpretation, or evaluation of mitigation strategies for geologic hazards.
    21. Effective Communication: Can appropriately communicate geologic or environmental data to an audience through reports or presentations.
    22. Information Competency: Evaluate and selectively use appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic and environmental information including library research, the Internet, and field research.
    23. Responsibility: Examine the relationship between self and the environment, evaluate potential impacts of actions,
    and make choices based on that examination and evaluation.
  
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    GEOL& 115 Geology National Parks (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GEOL 120 -CCN

    Course Description
    Introduces the student to basic geologic processes and history, using the variety of features preserved in our National Park and Monument system. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trips required. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic relationships between the solid earth, water, atmosphere, and life of the Earth through geologic time.
    2. Describe the difference between the National Park and Monument Systems and other related government agencies.
    3. Apply the scientific method and relate basic scientific concepts to geologic processes (e.g. plate tectonics or other examples).
    4. Evaluate the validity of uniformitarianism and catastrophism.
    5. Use mineral properties to identify common rock-forming minerals.
    6. Explain the rock cycle; classify and identify common igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.
    7. Describe the origin and occurrence of plutonic and volcanic rocks in selected parks and monuments.
    8. Discuss important weathering processes and explain sedimentary rock formation in selected parks and monuments.
    9. Describe the origin and occurrence of metamorphic rocks in selected parks and monuments.
    10. Describe plate tectonic processes.
    11. Identify geologic structures. Relate the stresses created by tectonic plate movements to the formation of geologic structures in selected parks and monuments.
    12. Explain and apply the methods of relative and absolute dating; and reproduce the primary subdivisions of the geologic time scale.
    13. Describe the important geographic and physiographic features of the selected region parks and monuments.
    14. Relate the geography and physiography of the selected parks and monuments to their climate and weather.
    15. Describe the important rock and sediment units of the selected parks and monuments and discuss their origin and age.
    16. Describe the important geologic structures of the selected parks and monuments and discuss their origin and age.
    17. Relate the geologic history of the selected parks and monuments to important geologic processes through geologic time, and to the evolution of its present-day landscapes.
    18. Assess the significance of geologic hazards of the selected parks and monuments; analyze any other pertinent interactions between humans and the environment for the selected parks and monuments.
    19. Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Integrate and analyze quantitative data and qualitative information in several contexts. Examine assumptions; integrate experience, reason, and information to draw scientific conclusions. Examples: map and photo interpretation, or evaluation of mitigation strategies for human impacts on the national parks.
    20. Effective Communication: Appropriately communicate geologic or environmental data to an audience through reports or presentations.
    21. Information Competency: Evaluate and selectively use appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic and environmental information including library research, the Internet, and field research with respect to the selected national parks and monuments.
  
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    GEOL& 120 Volcanoes (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GEOL 282 - CCN

    Course Description
    A study of volcanoes, volcanic processes and volcanic hazards. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trips required. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the basic relationships between the solid earth, water, atmosphere, and life through geologic time.
    2. Apply the scientific method and relate basic scientific concepts to geologic processes (e.g. plate tectonics).
    3. Identify common rock forming minerals.
    4. Use mineral properties to identify common rock-forming and ore minerals.
    5. Explain the rock cycle.
    6. Distinguish between mafic, intermediate, and felsic magmas based on their chemical composition, and describe the properties of each.
    7. Relate important plate tectonic processes and environments to the generation of magma and to the formation and location of volcanoes.
    8. Describe and analyze the origin and ascent of magmas, including various mechanisms of melting.
    9. Compare magmas of varying chemistries, including evolution by partial melting and magmatic differentiation, and explain why magmas of different chemistries are produced in different tectonic settings.
    10. Explain how silica and gas content control the eruptive violence of volcanoes.
    11. Describe shield volcanoes in terms of landforms, lava types, and tectonic settings
    12. Assess the hazards that shield volcanoes pose to humans and property, and analyze mitigating measures.
    13. Describe composite volcanoes in terms of landforms, lava types, and tectonic settings.
    14. Assess the hazards that composite volcanoes pose to humans and property, and analyze mitigating measures.
    15. Discuss the main concepts of other relevant topics in vulcanology as determined by the instructor (such as Volcanism of a Selected Region, Submarine Volcanism, Flood Basalts, Volcanism and Mineral Resources, Volcanism and Global Climate, Volcanism and Meteor Impacts).
    16. Responsibility: Recognizes Interconnectedness. See self as part of more extended humankind and global community. Describe self and others in relation to volcanic processes and hazards.
    17. Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Conclusions and Judgments. Combine some aspects of experience, reason, and information to make conclusions and judgments (e.g. the relationships between plate tectonics and volcano distribution).
    18. Information Competency: Evaluates Sources and Uses Tools. Evaluate and selectively use most appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic information, including library research, the Internet, and field research.
  
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    GEOL& 208 Geology of Pacific Northwest (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite GEOL& 101  or GEOL& 103  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A study of the development of the Pacific Northwest, including pertinent rock formations, structures, mineral resources, environmental issues, and fossils. Appropriate for non-science and science majors. Field trips required. Labs included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Label on a map the important geographic localities pertinent to the geology of the Pacific Northwest (PNW).
    2. Apply principles of sequence stratigraphy to the geologic development of PNW and its major rock sequences.
    3. Decipher the origin of Archean crystalline basement rocks of the North American craton and related mineral resources.
    4. Relate the origin of the Belt/Purcell/Deer Trail Supergroups and associated mineral resources to the tectonic regime of North America in the Proterozoic.
    5. Interpret the depositional setting and assess the economic importance of the Phanerozoic cratonic sequences of North America within the PNW.
    6. Compare and contrast the timing and style of deformation associated with Antler, Sevier, and Laramide Orogenies.
    7. Describe and assess the economic importance of massive sulfide deposits and ophiolites as distinctive accreted rocks.
    8. Relate the accretion of exotic terranes in the Mesozoic to the break-up of Pangaea and the developing collisional tectonic regime of the PNW.
    9. Assess the current theories on the origin of Challis synthem arkoses and volcanics.
    10. Interpret the origin of the metamorphic core complexes of the early Tertiary.
    11. Discuss the deformation that affected the PNW in the early Tertiary.
    12. Relate the origin of arc volcanics and granitic plutons of the Kittitas synthem to the Oligocene/early Miocene tectonic regime.
    13. Describe the Miocene basalts and related strata of the Walpapi synthem and debate their origin; assess the environmental hazards of nuclear waste disposal in the Columbia River Basalt Group at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.
    14. Interpret the age progression of calderas from southeastern Oregon to northwestern Wyoming with respect to the Yellowstone hot spot.
    15. Describe the properties of the Basin and Range Province (physical, geophysical, structural, volcanic, sedimentary) and assess its development with respect to other salient tectonic features of the North American Cordillera (San Andreas Fault, Yellowstone hot spot).
    16. Describe deformational features of the late Tertiary and Quaternary Periods, and discuss current tectonic models of the PNW, and assess seismic hazards affecting the region.
    17. Relate arc volcanics of the High Cascades synthem to the tectonic regime of the Quaternary, and assess volcanic hazards of the region.
    18. Describe and interpret glacial features and processes of the High Cascades synthem.
    19. Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Integrate and analyze quantitative data and qualitative information in several contexts. Examine assumptions; integrates experience, reason, and to draw scientific conclusions. Examples: map and photo interpretation, determining rock types, relative age, and origin of rock units in the field.
    20. Information Competency: Evaluates Sources and Uses Tools. Evaluate and selectively use most appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate geologic information, including library research, the Internet, and field research.
    21. Effective Communication: Can appropriately communicate geologic data to an audience through reports or presentations.

History

  
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    HIST 168 Vietnam War as History (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An in-depth look at the issues leading up to and sustaining American involvement in Vietnam. This examination involves historical, economic, political, religious and social issues from a number of different cultural perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze differences and similarities of American and Vietnamese history in order to understand each side’s point of view.
    2. Analyze the differences between politics of capitalism/democracy and communism.
    3. Analyze the difference between the religious systems of American and Vietnamese cultures.
    4. Analyze the impact that the war in Vietnam had on the neighboring country of Cambodia.
    5. Analyze the impact the War in Vietnam on the Cold War.
    6. Discuss the politics of American, Chinese and North Vietnamese decisions during the conflict in order to understand the war’s end.
    7. Analyze the use of the press during the conflict in order to understand America’s perception of the war in Vietnam.
  
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    HIST 175 A Brief History of Global Leadership (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This class is a brief history of global leadership. Emphasis is placed on post -1850 political, socioeconomic, scientific and cultural developments that leaders faced in America, Europe, Mesoamerica, Africa and Asia.

    Student Outcomes
    A. Identify the notable historical ideas and challenges Western and Non-Western leaders faced.
    B. Explain the differences and similarities of the significant challenges leaders faced.
    C. Compare and contrast the similarities and differences among leaders in an historical context.
    D. Analyze the efficacy of the decisions concerning both national and international challenges.
    E. Discuss the historical importance of global leaders’ decisions.
    F. Analyze leaders’ decisions in terms of domestic and international importance.
  
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    HIST 207 Historical Study Abroad (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A historical overview of the economic, religious, social, legal, educational and artistic make up of a city, culture or country other than the United States.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the visited country.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the culture of the visited country.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) among different historical movements, changes and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the visited country today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of the visited country.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the visited country today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of the culture visited country of the said country on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an even wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and the country in question based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as fundamental aspects of the politics, economics, culture, education, science & technology, law, military establishment, and environment of the visit country plus its relations with the USA.
  
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    HIST 230 Concise History of Science & Technology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey course emphasizing salient aspects of the evolution of science and technology and their impacts on society from prehistoric to modern times.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare and contrast the cardinal developments in science and technology in different periods and civilizations.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    2. Analyze the chief factors contributing to scientific and technological advances.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, religious, economic, intellectual, political) among different movements and trends that have stimulated progress in the realms of science and technology.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    4. Identify the chief benefits for humanity resulting from the advances in science and technology.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    5. Analyze the major negative aspects of and problems associated with the advances in science and technology.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentation, written assignments)
    6. Draw conclusions from the past discussing recent and present trends in the evolution of science and technology and their possible impact on the future course of history.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    7. Develop a comprehensive plan that would create mutually beneficial ties between scientists and engineers from different nations, based on historical concepts studied in this course.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
  
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    HIST 260 History of Russia and the Soviet Union (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Explore the development of the Russian state from 700 A.D. to the present. Emphasis is on the political, economic, and religious ideas which shaped the Russian outlook and eventually culminated in the rise and fall of the Soviet Union.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the FSU republic.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the FSU cultures.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the FSU today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of the FSU.
    7. Analyze the positions in the world of the FSU republics today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of the FSU cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an ever wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the USA and the FSU, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of the FSU republics.
  
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    HIST 265 History of Latin America Since 1810 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The course will examine the historical development, cultural milieu, and elements of the geography of all nations in Mesoamerica, the Caribbean, and South America. The regional and chronological approaches will be used when dwelling on issues, such as revolutions, guerrilla movements, political strife, social inequality, ethnic diversity, environmental degradation, globalization, etc.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in Latin America since 1810.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the cultures of Latin America.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing Latin America today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present historical trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultures of the region.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the countries of Latin America today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of Latin America’s cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for mutually advantageous ties between the U.S. and Latin America, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of the countries of Latin America.
  
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    HIST 266 History of Europe Since 1870 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The course will examine the development, cultural milieu, and elements of the geography of all nations in Europe. The regional and chronological approaches will be used when dwelling on issues, such as wars, revolutions, guerrilla movements, political strife, social inequality, ethnic diversity, environmental degradation, globalization, etc.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in Europe since 1870.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the cultures of Europe.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) among different historical movements, changes and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing Europe today.
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultures of the nations in Europe.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the countries of Europe today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of European on Non-European cultures.
    9. Determine an overall plan for mutually advantageous ties between the U.S. and Europe based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of the countries of Europe.
  
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    HIST 268 History of Warfare (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course will cover the most significant developments in warfare since antiquity. The regional and chronological approaches will be used, as well as the showing of relevant documentaries and presentations by local veterans of our military services.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the course of major wars.
    2. Explain the chief war-related aspects of the foreign policy doctrines of the governments involved.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) within the affected populations.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the nations impacted by war.
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible influence on the wars in question.
    6. Compare and contrast different types of wars.
    7. Determine the best possible preventive or preemptive methods to avert or limit wars in the contemporary world.
    8. Determine the best possible position of the U.S. toward ongoing wars.
    9. Discuss the impact of different wars on regional and global security.
    10. Discuss major features of the geography of the belligerents; fundamental aspects of the politics, economics, culture, and demography of the nations involved in wars; the evolution of tactics, strategy, and military technology; the segments of International Law dealing with wars; war-averting and peace-making efforts, and the U.S. policy toward the most significant military conflicts.
  
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    HIST 270 Introduction to the Far East (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of the major social, political, and economic trends in the Far East with emphasis on developments since the early 1800’s.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the nations of East Asia.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of East Asia.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing East Asia today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of East Asia.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of East Asia today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of East Asian cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an even wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and East Asia, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cutltural spheres of the nations of East Asia.
  
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    HIST 272 Survey of Middle East History (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of Middle East history from the 5th Century A.D. to the present, including the development of the modern states after World War II.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the subregions of the Middle East.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the culture of the Middle East.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) among different historical movements, changes and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the Middle East.
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of the Middle East.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the Middle East today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of the Middle East cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for mutually advantageous ties between the U.S. and the Middle East, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of the nations of the Middle East.
  
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    HIST 277 The Cold War (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An in-depth look at the post-Second World War era from 1945 to 1989. Emphasis is on the political, economic, and religious aspects of the Cold War and its impact on emerging Third World nations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare and contrast the cardinal developments during the Cold War.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    2. Evaluate the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the cultures of the leading nations of the world.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, racial, gender, artistic, intellectual) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    4. Identify the major flash points during the Cold War.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    5. Draw conclusions from the Cold War and discuss its imprint on post-1991 historical trends and movements.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentation, written assignments)
    6. Compare and contrast the cultures of the leading nations of the world during the Cold War era.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    7. Analyze the positions in the world during the Cold War and today of the principle members of the two opposing blocs.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    8. Determine an overall plan to deal with the residue and legacy of the Cold War.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
  
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    HIST 280 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of the major aspects in the development of Chinese civilization from antiquity to the present day.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all regions of China.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of China.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing China today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of China.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of China today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of China’s cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an even wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and China, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of China.
  
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    HIST 284 Introduction to the Balkans (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey course in the history of the Balkans, a region that cradles some of the world’s oldest civilizations and forms as a crossroads between Europe and Asia. Emphasis placed on post-1800 political, socioeconomic and cultural developments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the Balkan nations.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of the Balkan peoples.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the Balkans today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the cultural realms of the Balkans.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the Balkans today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of Balkan cultures on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an even wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and the Balkans, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of the Balkan Nations.
  
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    HIST 287 History of Japan Since Antiquity (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to the history, geography, culture, and present position of Japan in the international community. Cardinal developments in a broad range of human activities will be covered in a chronological order.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the six regions of Japan.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the culture of Japan.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) among different historical movements, changes and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems facing Japan today.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future.
    6. Compare and contrast the four cultural realms of Japan.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the Empire of Japan today and in the near future.
    8. Discuss the impact of Japan’s culture on the world.
    9. Determine an overall plan for an even wider range of mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and Japan, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    10. Discuss from a historical perspective major features of the geography, as well as current developments in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Japan.
  
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    HIST& 126 World Civilizations I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    Examines the growth and development of various civilizations from the Stone Age to 1100. Emphasis is on political, economic, religious, and cultural similarities and differences among these civilizations.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in selected civilizations.
    2.Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the cultures of selected states.
    3.Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4.Identify the major problems confronting selected civilizations.
    5.Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments
    6.Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the ancient and medieval world.
    7.Analyze the position in the world today of nations that are heirs to ancient and medieval civilizations.
    8.Discuss the impact on selected ancient and medieval cultures on the world.
    9.Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of selected ancient and medieval civilizations.
  
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    HIST& 127 World Civilizations II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 102 - CCN

    Course Description
    Examines the growth and development of various civilizations from the Renaissance to 1815. Emphasis is on the ideas which spawned religious, economic, political, and scientific revolutions and their impact on various civilizations.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in selected civilizations.
    2.Explain the chief components (religious, economic, poltical, etc.) of the cultures of selected states.
    3.Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4.Identify the major problems confronting selected civilizations.
    5.Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6.Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the world during the period in question.
    7.Analyze the position in the world today of nations that are heirs to civilizations that existed between 1500 and 1815.
    8.Discuss the impact of selected early modern cultures on the world.
    9.Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of selected civilizations existing during the said period.
  
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    HIST& 128 World Civilizations III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 103 -CCN

    Course Description
    Examines the growth and development of the modern nation state from 1815 to the present. Emphasis is centered on political, economic, religious, and social developments in major civilizations and their impact on a regional and global scale.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in selected civilizations.
    2.Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the cultures of selected states.
    3.Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4.Identify the major problems confronting selected civilizations.
    5.Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6.Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the modern world.
    7.Analyze the position in the world today of nations that are heirs to pre-Modern Era civilizations.
    8.Discuss the impact of selected modern cultures on the world.
    9.Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of selected modern civilizations.
  
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    HIST& 156 History of US I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 241 -CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of the economic, social, political and diplomatic history of the United States from the period of European expansion to 1840.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all regions of the USA prior to 1840.
    2.Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the pre-1840 culture of the USA.
    3.Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4.Identify the major problems confronting the pre-1840 USA.
    5.Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6.Compare and contrast the cultural realms of the pre-1840 USA.
    7.Analyze the position in the world of the young American nation.
    8.Discuss the impact of the culture of the pre-1840 USA on the world.
    9.Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of the history of the pre-1840 USA.
  
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    HIST& 157 History of US II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 242 - CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of the economic, social, political and diplomatic history of the United States from 1840 to 1900.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all regions of the USA between 1840 and 1860.
    2.Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of the USA between 1840 and 1900.
    3.Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4.Identify the major problems confronting the USA between 1840 and 1860.
    5.Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6.Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the USA between 1840 and 1900.
    7.Analyze the position in the world of the American nation between 1840 and 1900.
    8.Discuss the impact of the culture of the USA on the world during the said period.
    9.Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of the history of the USA during the period in question.
  
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    HIST& 158 History of US III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 243 - CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of the economic, social, political and diplomatic history of the United States from 1900 to present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all regions of the USA since 1900.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of the USA since 1900.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems confronting the USA since 1900.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6. Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the USA since 1900.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the American nation during the said period.
    8. Discuss the impact of the culture of the USA on the world since 1900.
    9. Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of the history of the USA during the period in question.
  
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    HIST& 159 History of US IV (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 244 - CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of the economic, social, political and diplomatic history of the United States from 1939 to present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all regions of the USA since 1939.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of the USA since 1939.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems confronting the USA since 1939.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6. Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the USA since 1939.
    7. Analyze the position in the world of the American nation during the said period.
    8. Discuss the impact of the culture of the USA on the world since 1939.
    9. Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of the history of the USA during the period in question.
  
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    HIST& 214 Pacific Northwest History (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HIST 264 - CCN

    Course Description
    History of Washington and the Pacific Northwest: exploration, settlement, economic development, growth of government and social institutions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in all subregions of the Pacific Northwest.
    2. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political, etc.) of the culture of the Pacific Northwest.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious, etc.) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    4. Identify the major problems confronting the Pacific Northwest.
    5. Draw conclusions from history, discussing long-lasting trends and their possible impact on current and future developments.
    6. Compare and contrast the major cultural realms of the Pacific Northwest.
    7. Analyze the position in North America of the Pacific Northwest.
    8. Discuss the impact of the culture of the Pacific Northwest on the rest of North America.
    9. Explain the most valuable lessons drawn from the analysis of the history of the Pacific Northwest.

Homeland Security Emergency Management

  
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    HSEM 102 Introduction to Homeland Security Emergency Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite This is a required first course to enter the HSEM degree program. Must earn a grade of 2.0 or better before taking other HSEM courses.

    Course Description
    Provides groundwork on which emergency services can build a strong foundation for disaster and emergency management for homeland security in the 21st century. Addresses issues, policies, questions, best practices, and lessons learned through recent years; requirements of NFPA® 1600, Standard on Emergency Management and exposure to new and developing theories, practices, and technology in emergency management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and define essential elements of an effective emergency management program.
    2. Identify and define the many roles, responsibilities and functions of the professional emergency manager.
    3. Analyze the requirements of National Fire Protection Association 1600 standard and other national programs.
    4. Identify and research questions regarding existing and emergent laws, regulations, and legal principles as applied in the context of emergency and disaster management.
    5. Describe the actions taken in hazard identification.
    6. Examine and analyze the actions taken when planning for incident prevention and hazard mitigation.
    7. Describe basic components of mutual aid systems.
    8. Provide an overview of characteristics of disasters and their impact on population, infrastructure, and emergency management systems.
    9. Explore and describe the components of an emergency plan and principles that guide the planning process.
    10. Summarize emergency management field operations using incident management systems and the role of emergency operations centers in directing disaster response.
    11. Analyze compliance requirements for emergency communications and warnings.
    12. Examine and describe key elements to consider in emergency management exercise and evaluation.
    13. Summarize requirements for crisis communications and public information systems.
    14. Analyze how an Emergency Operation Center is managed, organized and activated.
    15. Evaluate written emergency management and continuity plans.
    16. Examine fiscal aspects to emergency management programs that should be considered, evaluated and implemented.
  
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    HSEM 103 Disaster Recovery and Response (2 credits)



    Prerequisite HSEM 102  and HSEM 120  with at least a 2.0 grade in each of these classes or program coordinator approval.

    Course Description
    The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand and think critically about response and recovery operations in the profession of emergency management. Students will utilize problem based learning by analyzing actual disaster events and applying the theories, principals, and practice of response and recovery. In addition, students will learn about the issues faced by special populations and how to address these special needs in natural disaster response and recovery.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine what occurs during a disaster and the impact it has on life, property and the environment.
    2. Differentiate between the responsibilities of the local government after a disaster versus those of the state and federal government.
    3. Analyze human responses to disasters.
    4. Compare traditional and professional approaches to disaster and determine which approach is most applicable in a given disaster situation.
    5. Define the role of warnings, evacuation and shelter in natural disaster response.
    6. Examine the process through which individual assistance may be obtained.
    7. Examine special issues during recovery including damage to the environment from hazards and sheltering animal populations.
    8. Identify communication strategies during crisis/disaster.
    9. Evaluate damage assessment and response techniques and their application to disaster situations.
    10. Apply principles and practice of response and recovery in case study disaster events.
 

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