2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Jul 23, 2024  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Pierce College Adult Diploma - ABE

  
  • PCADA 057 United States Civics (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    The course will provide students with a broad view of America’s past and present history and its political structure.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the foundations of the American political system, as well as the basic values and principles of American democracy.
    2. Describe how the government established by the United States Constitution embodies the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy.
    3. Explain how state and local government is established by the Washington State Constitution.
    4. Summarize active roles as a citizen at the local, state, and national levels of government.
    5. Explain how the political and legal systems provide a means to balance competing interests and resolve conflicts.
    6. Explain why laws are needed and how they are enacted, implemented, and enforced at the national, state, and local levels.
    7. Identify how and why individuals and groups make economic, political, and social choices.
    8. Analyze features of the economic, political, and social system of the United States in order to recognize patterns between and among the three systems.
    9. Analyze factors influencing the United States economy, policy, and social structures in order to interpret current events between and among the three systems.
    10. Debate issues regarding the personal responsibilities of citizens in the American constitutional democracy.
  
  • PCADA 061 Biology with Lab (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will grant students a deeper understanding of the processes involved in regulating the properties of life, starting with basic cellular processes, to the expression of genes that results in biodiversity as we know it. This course integrates technology, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills around assignments and activities focusing on biology. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the concepts and terminology associated with the scientific method and apply them to different laboratory and written assignments throughout the quarter.
    2. Identify the characteristics of life in different organisms and situations.
    3. Explore how structure/function relationships determine the hierarchical organization of different interacting systems.
    4. Describe the structure and function of atoms, isotopes, ions and molecules; define the monomer and arrangements into polymers of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, ATP, and describe their roles in biological chemistry.
    5. Identify cell organelles and describe their functions.
    6. Examine the role of the plasma membrane in facilitating movement of materials into and out of the cell through different modes of transport.
    7. Predict particle movement under different environmental circumstances and plan an investigation to test these hypotheses.
    8. Define energy and discuss the importance of ATP as a driver of all cellular processes.
    9. Construct a model that explains how the molecular processes of cellular respiration fuel life through the generation and recycling of energy and biomolecules.
    a. HS-LS1-7. Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
    b. HS-LS2-3. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.
    c. HS-LS1-6. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules.
    10. Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy. (HS-LS1-5)
    a. HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
    b. HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
    11. Utilize appropriate terminology to compare and contrast the processes of somatic and germ cell division and evaluate their respective roles in the life of an organism.
    a. HS-LS1-4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
    12. Apply concepts and evidence of Mendelian genetics within the context of meiotic cell division to explain the development of genetic variations.
    a. HS-LS3-2. Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors. Emphasis is on using data to support arguments for the way variation occurs.
    b. HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
    13. Give an overview of the process and outcomes of DNA replication, transcription and translation.
    a. HS-LS1-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
    b. HS-LS3-1. Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
    14. Evaluate scientific evidence indicative of natural selection, adaptation, micro- and macro-evolution.
    a. HS-LS4-5. Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.
    b. HS-LS4-1. Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.
    c. HS-LS4-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.
    d. HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
    15. Propose and support explanations for species divergence and population evolution using specific case study examples.
    a. HS-LS4-4. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.
    b. HS-LS4-2. Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors: (1) the potential for a species to increase in number, (2) the heritable genetic variation of individuals in a species due to mutation and sexual reproduction, (3) competition for limited resources, and (4) the proliferation of those organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment.
    16. Evaluate the applications and bioethical concerns of biotechnology.
    17. Navigate published data to interpret evidence that supports a particular conclusion.
    18. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
  
  • PCADA 062 Environmental Science (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This non-lab natural science course is designed to for students to critically analyze environmental concepts and issues at both the local and international level. Emphasis will be on scientific evidence-based interpretation of environmental data to draw conclusions and the development of resolutions. Field trip required.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize the interdisciplinary and historical nature of environmental issues.
    2. Discuss the impact that philosophy, religion, art, media, tradition, and popular culture have had on people’s thinking about the environment.
    3. Summarize the roles of the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere within the environment and relate each to the biosphere.
    a. HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
    b. HS-ESS3-6. Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.
    c. HS-ESS2-7. Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous coevolution of Earth’s systems and life on Earth.
    4. Investigate inter- and intra-species relationships through data analysis, categorization of trophic levels, and construction of food webs. Relate these behaviors to species survival and ecosystem maintenance.
    a. HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
    b. HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
    c. HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce.
    5. Discuss the value of wilderness and biodiversity and threats to these systems, including pollution, invasive species, and human encroachment.
    a. HS-LS4-5: Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.
    b. HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.
    c. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    6. Diagram the hydrological cycle and the movement of water and energy within it.
    7. Evaluate how changes in the hydrological cycle affects other surface processes.
    a. HS-ESS2-5. Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on Earth materials and surface processes.
    b. HS-ESS2-2. Analyze geoscience data to make the claim that one change to Earth’s surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems.
    8. Examine local water quality through citizen-science and service-learning projects.
    a. Students will articulate ways in which individual and community action can play a role in creating sustainable systems.
    9. Explain the bio-geo-chemical cycles and summarize the flow of energy in an ecosystem as it relates to carbon and air quality.
    a. HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
    b. HS-ESS2-4. Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth’s systems result in changes in climate.
    c. HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
    d. HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
    10. Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth’s systems (HS-ESS3-5)
    a. HS-ESS3-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity.
    11. Explain the forces that shape local land use and the role human practices, such as agricultural methods and soil management, play in the global environment.
    12. Compare and contrast the differences between renewable and non-renewable energy sources and evaluate their relative contributions to climate change.
    a. HS-ESS3-2. Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios.
    13. Relate environmental, social, political, and economic factors to the concept of sustainability.
    a. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    14. Evaluate the political processes required to attempt the solution of environmental degradation issues at the local, national, and international level.
    15. Assess the use of multidisciplinary solutions to alleviate or modify human impacts on the environment.
    a. HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
    b. HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.
    c. HS-ESS3-4. Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems
    16. Debate a variety of environmental issues from both “pro” and “con” viewpoints.
    17. Describe the distribution, growth, and dynamics of the world human population and analyze the impact of the human population on the environment.
    a. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    18. Analyze the major contemporary environmental issues in the Western U.S. (local water issues, land use concerns, and conservation concerns)
    19. Communicate environmental data to an audience through reports or presentations.
  
  • PCADA 066 Introductory Physics with Lab (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students in this course will apply algebraic topics such as formula manipulation, fractions and decimals, and the evaluation of word and numeric expressions to solve introductory physics-related problems. Students will utilize math and computational thinking to make predictions and construct explanations regarding principles of motion, energy, and waves. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the basic formulas to apply to specific problems.
    2. Utilize deductive reasoning skills/strategies to work through word problems to identify a solution.
    3. Associate specific units with their related physical quantity.
    4. Use appropriate units when answering application problems.
    5. Determine the displacement, velocity, time, and acceleration of an object with constant and varying acceleration in one-dimensional motion.
    6. Investigate motion in terms of the forces that cause through experimentation and by applying Newton’s Laws of Motion.
    a. HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
    7. Analyze conservative and non-conservative forces using theories of work, mechanical energy, and the energy conservation principle, analyze conservative and non-conservative forces.
    a. HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
    b. HS-PS3-2. Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motions of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative position of particles (objects).
    c. HS-PS3-3. Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.
    8. Investigate the relationship between momentum and impulse, and use the principle of conservation of linear momentum to analyze elastic and inelastic collisions.
    a. HS-PS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system.
    b. HS-PS2-3. Apply scientific and engineering ideas to design, evaluate, and refine a device that minimizes the force on a macroscopic object during a collision.
    c. HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
    9. Apply various modern and cultural concepts of mechanics to the motion of celestial objects: and to the motion of objects on Earth.
    a. HS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system.
    10. Analyze the properties of electricity and magnetism and explain how these properties are connected to the theories and laws that describe them.
    a. HS-PS2-5. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electric current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current.
    b. HS-PS3-5. Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
    c. HS-PS4-3. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.
    11. Explain the difference between temperature, heat, and internal energy and apply the principles to observable phenomena.
    12. Apply the laws of thermodynamics to demonstrate transfer of thermal energy within a closed system.
    a. HS-PS3-4. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperature are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of thermodynamics).
    13. Describe the characteristics of waves and explain how they can be applied to the properties and behaviors associated with light and sound.
    a. HS-PS4-1. Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.
    14. Apply concepts of vibrations and waves to technological innovations.
    a. HS-PS4-5. Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.*
    b. HS-PS4-2. Evaluate questions about the advantages of using a digital transmission and storage of information.
    15. Evaluate published data to investigate claims related to energy absorption by matter.
    a. HS-PS4-4. Evaluate the validity and reliability of claims in published materials of the effects that different frequencies of electromagnetic radiation have when absorbed by matter.
  
  • PCADA 068 Earth Chemistry with Lab (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will introduce students to the chemical properties of matter and how to apply that knowledge to explore the chemical origins of the universe and the evolution of planet Earth and the features therein. This course integrates technology, reading, writing, and critical thinking skills around assignments and activities related to chemistry and Earth science. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collect experimental evidence and depict data in graphical form.
    2. Utilize appropriate units when making measurements.
    3. Understand the components of the scientific method.
    4. Recognize and use chemical symbols for elements and compounds.
    5. Describe the basic structure of atoms and ions and relate them to their location on the Periodic Table, their charge, and the number of fundamental particles.
    6. Relate physical and chemical properties of matter to the Periodic Table, including metals, non-metals, metalloids, group names, ionic charge, and valence electrons.
    a. HS-PS1-1. Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the basics of chemical bonding, describing how and why atoms come together to make molecules.
    a. HS-PS1-2. Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
    8. Relate energy changes to changes on a molecular level that affect reaction rates and chemical equilibrium.
    a. HS-PS1-4. Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
    b. HS-PS1-5. Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
    c. HS-PS1-6. Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.
    9. Describe physical phenomena on a molecular level.
    a. HS-PS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare the structure of substances at the bulk scale to infer the strength of electrical forces between particles.
    10. Balance simple chemical equations to demonstrate the law of conservation of matter.
    a. HS-PS1-7. Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.
    11. Apply chemical knowledge to explain the formation of the universe, solar system, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets and justify using supporting evidence.
    a. HS-PS1-8. Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.
    b. HS-ESS1-2. Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe.
    c. HS-ESS1-1. Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches Earth in the form of radiation.
    d. HS-ESS1-3. Communicate scientific ideas about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements.
    12. Explain how the earth has changed through geologic history and the chemical evidence that supports these changes.
    a. HS-ESS1-6. Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient Earth materials, meteorites, and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of Earth’s formation and early history.
    b. HS-ESS2-3. Develop a model based on evidence of Earth’s interior to describe the cycling of matter by thermal convection.
    13. Evaluate evidence to explain the ages of crustal rocks (HS-ESS1-5).
    a. Radioactive d
  
  • PCADA 071 Basic Mathematics (ABE) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite None

    Course Description
    Operations and applications with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Order of operations. Converting among number representations; placing numbers in order. Basic applications, including use of percent and geometry.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform mathematical tasks (add, subtract, multiply, divide, squares, square roots of perfect squares, rounding, order of operations, number conversion) with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and integers in order to solve application problems (including arithmetic and geometric) with and without the use of a calculator.
     
    2. Use mathematical equivalences across different types of numerical expression (fractions, decimals, etc) to solve problems.
     
    3, Demonstrate basic math fact fluency in order to develop the ability to put math problems and solutions into context.
     
    4. Apply the concept of mathematical units in support of solving problems and communicating solutions in order to develop problem-solving capabilities.
     
    5. Estimate the solution to problems in order to provide redundant systems of calculation and error detection.
  
  • PCADA 072 Beginning Algebra (ABE) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Placement or completion of PCADA 071

    Course Description
    Operations with fractions, decimals, percents, and signed numbers. Simplify algebraic expressions. Solve linear equations. Solve a variety of application problems by using common formulas.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform the four basic operations in multi-step calculations with positive and negative rational numbers, and percents expressed in fractional notation and decimal form (with and without calculators) in order to develop math fluency. 
    2. Interpret the meaning of mathematical expressions and solutions in order to develop problem-solving capability.
    3. Simplify, evaluate, and transform basic algebraic expressions and equations in order to develop problem-solving capability.
    4. Estimate and solve a variety of arithmetic and geometric application problems and one-variable linear equations in order to apply mathematical solutions to problems. 
    5. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions in order to develop the ability to translate real-world problems into mathematically solvable form. 
    6. Interpret and present data through a variety of means (e.g. creating graphs, visualizations, tables), in order to develop the ability to analyze data.
  
  • PCADA 080 English for Washington State History (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help you develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. You will demonstrate reading comprehension and reflective thinking, and you will compose explanatory, expository, and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  
  • PCADA 081 Reading/Writing/Communication for Biology (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADA 082 Reading/Writing/Communication for Environmental Science (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Construct an annotated bibliography using valid source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADA 083 Reading/Writing/Communication for Modern World History (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    • Demonstrate the ability to communicate opinions and ideas through writing
    • Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning
    • Support points of view with evidence
    • Understand citation/reference formats and requirements
    • Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of the
    information
    • Develop sound sentence structure and proper punctuation usage through
    writing assignments

    READING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Application: cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary
    and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of
    the information.
    • Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether
    earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
    • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same
    or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in
    their respective accounts.
    • Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data)
    with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
    • Application: compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several
    primary and secondary sources.

    WRITING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
    texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
    • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and
    information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
    • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
    effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event
    sequences.
    • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
    and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
    • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
    rewriting, or trying a new approach.
    • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and
    to interact and collaborate with others.
    • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused
    questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
    • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess
    the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information
    while avoiding plagiarism.
    • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
    reflection, and research.
  
  • PCADA 084 English for US History and Government (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS minimum score for Reading/Listening of 211 for ESL

    CASAS minimum score for Reading of 221 for ABE

     

     

    Course Description
    This course will help you develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. You will demonstrate reading comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.

  
  • PCADA 085 English for Current World Issues (5 credits)



    Prerequisite None

    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    2. Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    3. Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    4. Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    5. Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    6. Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    7. Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  
  • PCADA 086 Reading/Writing/Communication for Intro to Physics with Lab (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADA 087 Reading/Writing/Communication for United States Civics (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning.
    3. Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims.
    4. Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources.
    5. Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text.
    6. Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information.
    7. Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English.
    8. Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
    9. Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately.
    10. Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas.
    11. Construct an annotated bibliography using valid source materials.
    12. Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems.
    13. Perform research using technology.
    14. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings.
  
  • PCADA 088 Reading/Writing/Communication for Earth Chemistry (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning.
    3. Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims.
    4. Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources.
    5. Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text.
    6. Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information.
    7. Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English.
    8. Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
    9. Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately.
    10. Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas.
    11. Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials.
    12. Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems.
    13. Perform research using technology.
    14. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings.
  
  • PCADA 089 Pre-Academic Grammar and Writing (ABE) (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Placement into ESL Level 5-6 or ABE Levels 3-6.

    Course Description
    Designed for you to learn and/or review grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and writing strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write sentences using different sentence patterns.
    2. Use the elements of sentence construction (e.g. subjects, predicates, nouns, verbs, etc.) in accordance with communicative goals.
    3. Proofread and correct common grammar and punctuation errors (e.g., subject/verb agreement, capital letters, punctuation, verb tense and parallelism, pronoun types and agreement) as part of the writing process.
    4. Recognize genre differences in various styles of writing in order to analyze the differences in styles.
    5. Apply coherence, unity, sentence variety, and clarity in reading and writing.
    6. Refine the writing process by planning/prewriting, revising/editing, and rewriting.
  
  • PCADA 090 Foundations for Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Prerequisite None

    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills, technology literacy, and goal setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze effectiveness of self-management skills, including time management techniques and setting goals to monitor progress
    2. Discuss and apply effective study skills to improve study habits.
    3. Access technological resources available through Pierce College to allow online engagement inside and outside the classroom.
  
  • PCADA 091 Foundations for Ongoing Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Prerequisite None

    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills, pathways affirmation, and goal setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Access technological resources to utilize them for common academic tasks (uploading multiple file types, familiarity with Canvas, etc).
    2. Be able to describe preparation and study techniques suitable for an academic class.
    3. Implement effective reading comprehension strategies including: how to evaluate reading comprehension roadblocks and choose an appropriate action plan in order to build metacognitive awareness.
    4. Evaluate individual progress through self-reflection.
    5.  Review and evaluate personal Guided Pathway progress in order to either affirm a pathway or change to a different pathway.
  
  • PCADA 094 Survey in Art History (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Survey in Art History is a general introduction to the chronological development of art from paleolithic cave paintings to the present.  Topics include a comprehensive look at art and architecture as interpretations of a changing world.  

    Student Outcomes
    Apply the four components of art criticism (describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate) in order to look at art as it exists in the world and to develop a personal appreciation of art.
    Apply knowledge of major periods and artists in art history in order to analyze how culture, place, time, and context impact art, and how art impacts culture, place, time, and context.
    Communicate ideas related to art history and artistic styles using multiple methods.
    Interrogate one’s own identities/positionalities, privileges, biases, and perspectives in relation to art.
  
  • PCADA 095 Foundations in Visual Art (ABE) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Foundations in Visual Art is an investigation into the components of art to include a study of aesthetics, the nature of art, and its functions and purposes; critical analysis of the elements and principles of art and design, interpretation, and evaluation of artwork; art history; and art production. The course is designed to enrich through discovery and creative problem-solving while providing an overview of the role of the artist in interpreting and contributing to culture from local and global perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply basic art vocabulary and concepts.
    2. Analyze art within culture, place, and time.
    3. Identify characteristics of artistic styles of individual artists within various cultures.
    4. Describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate art.
    5. Apply various art media and processes in making works of art.
    6. Investigate academic and career paths related to the visual arts.
    7. Respond to art orally and in writing.
  
  • PCADA 096 Fitness and Wellness (ABE) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite None or enrollment in the PCAD Program

    Course Description
    An independent fitness course to develop the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to adapt, improve and sustain a healthy lifestyle.

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Reflect on one’s personal wellness and define personal wellness goals and precise strategies for achievement of these goals. 
    2.  Analyze the results of one’s personal fitness assessments to develop goals and strategies to improve the components of fitness.
    3.  Design a personal fitness program based on personal goals.
    4.  Track and monitor goals and the details of progress while following safety precautions for individualized exercise. 
    5.  Identify stressors in one’s life, barrriers to change and realistic strategies to manage stress through identification of resources and motivational strategies.
  
  • PCADA 097 Advanced Fitness and Wellness (ABE) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite None or enrollment in PCAD Program 

    Course Description
    An independent fitness course designed to promote and implement the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to adapt, improve and sustain a healthy lifestyle.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reflect on one’s personal wellness and define personal wellness goals and precise strategies for achievement of these goals. 
    2.  Analyze the results of one’s personal fitness assessments to develop goals and strategies to improve the components of fitness.
    3.  Implement a personal fitness program based on personal goals.
    4.  Utilize safety precautions for individualized exercise to monitor and track the details of one’s progress. 
    5.  Implement realistic strategies to manage stress, available resources, and motivation.
  
  • PCADA 098 PCAD Service Learning Pathway Exploration (ABE) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in Pierce College Adult Diploma program.

    Course Description
    Through completing a service project students will gain insight into career pathways and their role in society. Students will investigate expectations of real-world employers. The volunteer experience will be evaluated through career, community, and personal perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate values, interests, and strengths to identify or affirm a career pathway.
    2. Research job outlooks within a career pathway.
    3. Discuss the role the chosen career has in society.
    4. Investigate community needs and resources using a variety of information-gathering methods and sources.
    5. Identify behavior expectations and soft skills needed when working in a particular career.
    6. Participate in a service project related to the chosen career pathway.
    7. Reflect on personal impacts of participation in the service activity.
    8. Integrate personal learning and volunteer experience into decision-making regarding the chosen career pathway.

Pierce College Adult Diploma - ESL

  
  • PCADE 050 Washington State History and Government (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course meets Washington State’s requirement for Washington State History. This course is designed to develop your awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the history of the regions and development of the Pacific Northwest.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare how the history of regional environment shapes how economies develop, people live, and culture develops in order to understand historical context.
    2. Identify key ideals set forth in fundamental documents, including the Washington State Constitution and tribal treaties, and compare/contrast with historical actions taken in order to understand present cultural context.
    3. Summarize the role and struggle of immigration in shaping communities in the past and present in order to develop empathy for marginalized populations.
    4. Reflect on diverse viewpoints on public issues and the effects on communities in order to develop empathy for diverse communities.
    5. Analyze how local issues affect national and global history in order to develop an understanding of political context.
    6. Analyze how cultural and historical events are remembered and/or revised by diverse communities in order to develop a critical view of history.
  
  • PCADE 051 US History and Government (ESL) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Minimum CASAS Reading/Listening score of 211 for ESL students

    Minimum CASAS Reading score of 221 for ABE students

    Course Description
    The course will provide students with a broad view of America’s 20th Century history and its political structure.

    Student Outcomes
    Synthesize historical information and significance from knowledge about everyday life, personal experiences/interest, cultural frameworks, and fundamental documents in order to understand how to generate understanding from multiple data points. .
    Identify significant historical events, their chronology, and their impact on society, past and present in order to gain an understanding of the current political context. 
    Demonstrate how changes in foreign policy, military affairs, economic policy, and the actions of local communities leads to change in legislation and impacts on national and local communities in order to understand the relationship between different levels of govenment and communities.
    Analyze how diverse groups of people in the US in global context have historically lived, acted, and thought in order to develop empathy for historical people and situations.
    Reflect on understanding of historical context in order to develop empathy for the contemporary world and the diverse people who live in that world. 
    Evaluate both primary and secondary sources in order to critically understand points of view.

  
  • PCADE 053 Modern World History (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course meets Washington State’s requirement for modern world history. This course is designed to develop students’ awareness, appreciation and understanding of world history. Students explore major themes and developments that have shaped the modern world, including geography, human rights, revolution and democracy.

    Student Outcomes
    Unit Outline 1: Global Expansion and Encounters (1450-1750)
    • Understands how themes and their developments help to define eras in world history

    • Analyzes change and continuity within a historical time period

    • Identifies major world regions and understands their cultural roots

    • Understands the causes and effects of voluntary and involuntary migration in the world in the past or present

    • Understands how the geography of expansion and encounter has shaped global politics and economics in the past or present

    Unit Outline 2: Age of Revolutions (1750-1914)
    • Understands how themes and their developments help to define eras in world history

    • Analyzes how individuals and movements have shaped world history

    • Analyzes how cultures and cultural groups have shaped world history

    • Analyzes how the costs and benefits of economic choices have shaped events in the world in the past or present

    • Analyzes and evaluates how technology and ideas have shaped world history

    • Evaluates multiple reasons or factors to develop a position paper or presentation

    • Creates strategies to avoid plagiarism and respects intellectual property when developing a paper or presentation

    Unit Outline 3: International Conflicts (1870-Present)
    • Understands how themes and their developments help to define eras in world history

    • Analyzes the multiple causal factors of conflicts in world history

    • Analyzes and interprets historical materials from a variety of perspectives in world history

    • Analyzes consequences of positions on an issue or event

    • Evaluates the precision of a position on an issue or event

    • Evaluates the impact of various forms of government on people in the past or present

    • Creates strategies to avoid plagiarism and respects intellectual property when developing a paper or presentation

    Unit Outline 4: Emergence and Development of New Nations (1900-Present)
    • Understands how themes and their developments help to define eras in world history

    • Understands and analyzes how planned and market economies have shaped the production, distribution, and consumption of goods, services, and resources around the world in the past or present

    • Analyzes how and why countries have specialized in the production of particular goods and services in the past or present

    • Analyzes the costs and benefits of government trade policies from around the world in the past or present

    • Analyzes and evaluates how people across the world have addressed issues involved with the distribution of resources and sustainability in the past or present

    • Creates and uses research questions that are tied to an essential question to focus inquiry on an idea, issue, or event

    • Evaluates the validity, reliability, and credibility of sources when researching an issue or event

    • Evaluates one’s own viewpoint and the viewpoints of others in the context of a discussion

    Unit Outline 5:
    • Understands how themes and their developments help to define eras in world history

    • Analyzes and evaluates human interaction with the environment across the world in the past or present

    • Understands and analyzes examples of ethnocentrism

    • Analyzes how an understanding of world history can help us prevent problems today

    READING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Application: cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
    • Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
    • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
    • Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
    • Application: compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

    WRITING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
    • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
    • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.
    • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
    • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
    • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
    • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
    • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
    • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  
  • PCADE 054 Contemporary World Issues (ESL) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite None

    Course Description
    Students will examine the United States and diverse societies from around the world and explore major issues that affect our ability to connect and thrive as a global community.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Predict the dynamics of human societies by applying concepts of culture in order to develop the ability to develop understanding of societal trends and reactions. 
    2. Analyze how the lack or removal of human rights in the past has led to oppression and/or suffering in order to develop empathy and global citizenship.
    3. Analyze major patterns in human expression, subsistence, social organization, and belief systems in order to develop empathy for diverse communities and engage with them socially.
    4. Apply the understanding of how geographic context shapes global issues in order to develop the ability to make informed decisions about global events.
    5. Analyze global events using charts, graphs, maps, political cartoons, and primary and secondary sources in order to put contemporary world issues into context.
    6. Analyze how traditional media and emergent media/technology (social media, twitter bots, etc) influence beliefs and frame global events in order to engage in global citizenship.
  
  • PCADE 057 United States Civics (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    The course will provide students with a broad view of America’s past and present history and its political structure.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the foundations of the American political system, as well as the basic values and principles of American democracy.
    2. Describe how the government established by the United States Constitution embodies the purposes, values, and principles of American democracy.
    3. Explain how state and local government is established by the Washington State Constitution.
    4. Summarize active roles as a citizen at the local, state, and national levels of government.
    5. Explain how the political and legal systems provide a means to balance competing interests and resolve conflicts.
    6. Explain why laws are needed and how they are enacted, implemented, and enforced at the national, state, and local levels.
    7. Identify how and why individuals and groups make economic, political and social choices.
    8. Analyze features of the economic, political, and social system of the United States in order to recognize patterns between and among the three systems.
    9. Analyze factors influencing the United States economy, policy, and social structures in order to interpret current events.
    10. Debate issues regarding the personal responsibilities of citizens in the American constitutional democracy.
  
  • PCADE 061 Biology with Lab (ESL) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Physical Science or a non lab science on high school transcript.

    Course Description
    This course will grant students a deeper understanding of the processes involved in regulating the properties of life, starting with basic cellular processes, to the expression of genes that results in biodiversity as we know it. This course integrates technology, reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills around assignments and activities focusing on biology. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the concepts and terminology associated with the scientific method and apply them to different laboratory and written assignments throughout the quarter.
    2. Identify the characteristics of life in different organisms and situations.
    3. Explore how structure/function relationships determine the hierarchical organization of different interacting systems.
    4. Describe the structure and function of atoms, isotopes, ions and molecules; define the monomer and arrangements into polymers of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, ATP, and describe their roles in biological chemistry.
    5. Identify cell organelles and describe their functions.
    6. Examine the role of the plasma membrane in facilitating movement of materials into and out of the cell through different modes of transport.
    7. Predict particle movement under different environmental circumstances and plan an investigation to test these hypotheses.
    8. Define energy and discuss the importance of ATP as a driver of all cellular processes.
    9. Construct a model that explains how the molecular processes of cellular respiration fuel life through the generation and recycling of energy and biomolecules.
    a. HS-LS1-7. Use a model to illustrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy.
    b. HS-LS2-3. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for the cycling of matter and flow of energy in aerobic and anaerobic conditions.
    c. HS-LS1-6. Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence for how carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from sugar molecules may combine with other elements to form amino acids and/or other large carbon-based molecules.
    10. Use a model to illustrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy. (HS-LS1-5)
    a. HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
    b. HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
    11. Utilize appropriate terminology to compare and contrast the processes of somatic and germ cell division and evaluate their respective roles in the life of an organism.
    a. HS-LS1-4. Use a model to illustrate the role of cellular division (mitosis) and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex organisms.
    12. Apply concepts and evidence of Mendelian genetics within the context of meiotic cell division to explain the development of genetic variations.
    a. HS-LS3-2. Make and defend a claim based on evidence that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) viable errors occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors. Emphasis is on using data to support arguments for the way variation occurs.
    b. HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
    13. Give an overview of the process and outcomes of DNA replication, transcription and translation.
    a. HS-LS1-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through systems of specialized cells.
    b. HS-LS3-1. Ask questions to clarify relationships about the role of DNA and chromosomes in coding the instructions for characteristic traits passed from parents to offspring.
    14. Evaluate scientific evidence indicative of natural selection, adaptation, micro- and macro-evolution.
    a. HS-LS4-5. Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.
    b. HS-LS4-1. Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence.
    c. HS-LS4-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to organisms lacking this trait.
    d. HS-LS3-3. Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
    15. Propose and support explanations for species divergence and population evolution using specific case study examples.
    a. HS-LS4-4. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations.
    b. HS-LS4-2. Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors: (1) the potential for a species to increase in number, (2) the heritable genetic variation of individuals in a species due to mutation and sexual reproduction, (3) the competition for limited resources, and (4) the proliferation of those organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment.
    16. Evaluate the applications and bioethical concerns of biotechnology.
    17. Navigate published data to interpret evidence that supports a particular conclusion.
    18. Plan an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
  
  • PCADE 062 Environmental Science (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This non-lab natural science course is designed for students to critically analyze environmental concepts and issues at both the local and international level. Emphasis will be on scientific evidence-based interpretation of environmental data to draw conclusions and the development of resolutions. Field trip required.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize the interdisciplinary and historical nature of environmental issues.
    2. Discuss the impact that philosophy, religion, art, media, tradition, and popular culture have had on people’s thinking about the environment.
    3. Summarize the roles of the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere within the environment and relate each to the biosphere.
    a. HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
    b. HS-ESS3-6. Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.
    c. HS-ESS2-7. Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous coevolution of Earth’s systems and life on Earth.
    4. Investigate inter- and intra-species relationships through data analysis, categorization of trophic levels, and construction of food webs. Relate these behaviors to species survival and ecosystem maintenance.
    a. HS-LS2-1. Use mathematical and/or computational representations to support explanations of factors that affect carrying capacity of ecosystems at different scales.
    b. HS-LS2-6. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the complex interactions in ecosystems maintain relatively consistent numbers and types of organisms in stable conditions, but changing conditions may result in a new ecosystem.
    c. HS-LS2-8. Evaluate the evidence for the role of group behavior on individual and species’ chances to survive and reproduce.
    5. Discuss the value of wilderness and biodiversity and threats to these systems, including pollution, invasive species, and human encroachment.
    a. HS-LS4-5: Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.
    b. HS-LS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.
    c. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    6. Diagram the hydrological cycle and the movement of water and energy within it.
    7. Evaluate how changes in the hydrological cycle affects other surface processes.
    a. HS-ESS2-5. Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on Earth materials and surface processes.
    b. HS-ESS2-2. Analyze geoscience data to make the claim that one change to Earth’s surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems.
    8. Examine local water quality through citizen-science and service-learning projects.
    a. Students will articulate ways in which individual and community action can play a role in creating sustainable systems.
    9. Explain the bio-geo-chemical cycles and summarize the flow of energy in an ecosystem as it relates to carbon and air quality.
    a. HS-ESS2-6. Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.
    b. HS-ESS2-4. Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth’s systems result in changes in climate.
    c. HS-LS2-4. Use mathematical representations to support claims for the cycling of matter and flow of energy among organisms in an ecosystem.
    d. HS-LS2-5. Develop a model to illustrate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of carbon among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.
    10. Analyze geoscience data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth’s systems (HS-ESS3-5)
    a. HS-ESS3-1. Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity.
    11. Explain the forces that shape local land use and the role human practices, such as agricultural methods and soil management, play in the global environment.
    12. Compare and contrast the differences between renewable and non-renewable energy sources and evaluate their relative contributions to climate change.
    a. HS-ESS3-2. Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on cost-benefit ratios.
    13. Relate environmental, social, political, and economic factors to the concept of sustainability.
    a. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    14. Evaluate the political processes required to attempt the solution of environmental degradation issues at the local, national, and international level.
    15. Assess the use of multidisciplinary solutions to alleviate or modify human impacts on the environment.
    a. HS-LS2-7. Design, evaluate, and refine a solution for reducing the impacts of human activities on the environment and biodiversity.
    b. HS-LS4-6. Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.
    c. HS-ESS3-4. Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems
    16. Debate a variety of environmental issues from both “pro” and “con” viewpoints.
    17. Describe the distribution, growth, and dynamics of the world human population and analyze the impact of the human population on the environment.
    a. HS-ESS3-3. Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among the management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity.
    18. Analyze the major contemporary environmental issues in the Western U.S. (local water issues, land use concerns, and conservation concerns)
    19. Communicate environmental data to an audience through reports or presentations.
  
  • PCADE 066 Introductory Physics with Lab (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students in this course will apply algebraic topics such as formula manipulation, fractions and decimals, and the evaluation of word and numeric expressions to solve introductory physics-related problems. Students will utilize math and computational thinking to make predictions and construct explanations regarding principles of motion, energy, and waves. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the basic formulas to apply to specific problems.
    2. Utilize deductive reasoning skills/strategies to work through word problems to identify a solution
    3. Associate specific units with their related physical quantity
    4. Use appropriate units when answering application problems
    5. Determine the displacement, velocity, time, and acceleration of an object with constant and varying acceleration in one-dimensional motion.
    6. Investigate motion in terms of the forces that cause through experimentation and by applying Newton’s Laws of Motion.
    a. HS-PS2-1. Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
    7. Analyze conservative and non-conservative forces using theories of work, mechanical energy, and the energy conservation principle, analyze conservative and non-conservative forces.
    a. HS-PS3-1. Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other component(s) and energy flows in and out of the system are known.
    b. HS-PS3-2. Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motions of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative position of particles (objects).
    c. HS-PS3-3. Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.
    8. Investigate the relationship between momentum and impulse, and use the principle of conservation of linear momentum to analyze elastic and inelastic collisions.
    a. HS-PS2-2. Use mathematical representations to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system
    b. HS-PS2-3. Apply scientific and engineering ideas to design, evaluate, and refine a device that minimizes the force on a macroscopic object during a collision.
    c. HS-PS2-4. Use mathematical representations of Newton’s Law of Gravitation and Coulomb’s Law to describe and predict the gravitational and electrostatic forces between objects.
    9. Apply various modern and cultural concepts of mechanics to the motion of celestial objects: and to the motion of objects on Earth.
    a. HS-ESS1-4. Use mathematical or computational representations to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system
    10. Analyze the properties of electricity and magnetism and explain how these properties are connected to the theories and laws that describe them.
    a. HS-PS2-5. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electric current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current.
    b. HS-PS3-5. Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.
    c. HS-PS4-3. Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other.
    11. Explain the difference between temperature, heat, and internal energy and apply the principles to observable phenomena.
    12. Apply the laws of thermodynamics to demonstrate transfer of thermal energy within a closed system.
    a. HS-PS3-4. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperature are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of thermodynamics).
    13. Describe the characteristics of waves and explain how they can be applied to the properties and behaviors associated with light and sound.
    a. HS-PS4-1. Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.
    14. Apply concepts of vibrations and waves to technological innovations.
    a. HS-PS4-5. Communicate technical information about how some technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.*
    b. HS-PS4-2. Evaluate questions about the advantages of using a digital transmission and storage of information.
    15. Evaluate published data to investigate claims related to energy absorption by matter.
    a. HS-PS4-4. Evaluate the validity and reliability of claims in published materials of the effects that different frequencies of electromagnetic radiation have when absorbed by matter.
  
  • PCADE 068 Earth Chemistry with Lab (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will introduce students to the chemical properties of matter and how to apply that knowledge to explore the chemical origins of the universe and the evolution of planet Earth and the features therein. This course integrates technology, reading, writing, and critical thinking skills around assignments and activities related to chemistry and Earth science. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collect experimental evidence and depict data in graphical form.
    2. Utilize appropriate units when making measurements.
    3. Understand the components of the scientific method.
    4. Recognize and use chemical symbols for elements and compounds.
    5. Describe the basic structure of atoms and ions and relate them to their location on the Periodic Table, their charge, and the number of fundamental particles.
    6. Relate physical and chemical properties of matter to the Periodic Table, including metals, non-metals, metalloids, group names, ionic charge, and valence electrons.
    a. HS-PS1-1. Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of the basics of chemical bonding, describing how and why atoms come together to make molecules.
    a. HS-PS1-2. Construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.
    8. Relate energy changes to changes on a molecular level that affect reaction rates and chemical equilibrium.
    a. HS-PS1-4. Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
    b. HS-PS1-5. Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
    c. HS-PS1-6. Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would produce increased amounts of products at equilibrium.
    9. Describe physical phenomena on a molecular level.
    a. HS-PS1-3. Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare the structure of substances at the bulk scale to infer the strength of electrical forces between particles.
    10. Balance simple chemical equations to demonstrate the law of conservation of matter.
    a. HS-PS1-7. Use mathematical representations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.
    11. Apply chemical knowledge to explain the formation of the universe, solar system, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets and justify using supporting evidence.
    a. HS-PS1-8. Develop models to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay.
    b. HS-ESS1-2. Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe.
    c. HS-ESS1-1. Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the sun’s core to release energy that eventually reaches Earth in the form of radiation.
    d. HS-ESS1-3. Communicate scientific ideas about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements.
    12. Explain how the earth has changed through geologic history and the chemical evidence that supports these changes.
    a. HS-ESS1-6. Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient Earth materials, meteorites, and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of Earth’s formation and early history.
    b. HS-ESS2-3. Develop a model based on evidence of Earth’s interior to describe the cycling of matter by thermal convection.
    13. Evaluate evidence to explain the ages of crustal rocks (HS-ESS1-5).
    a. Radioactive dating.
  
  • PCADE 071 Basic Mathematics (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Operations and applications with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Order of operations. Converting among number representations; placing numbers in order. Basic applications, including use of percent and geometry. Study strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Whole numbers
    a. Read and write whole numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) with whole numbers.
    c. Calculate squares and cubes, and square roots of perfect squares.
    d. Perform multistep calculations with whole numbers using the correct order of operations.
    e. Perform techniques of rounding with whole numbers.
    f. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, and subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.

    2. Fractions
    a. Perform the four basic operations with positive fractions.
    b. Convert between improper fraction and mixed numbers.

    3. Decimals
    a. Read and write decimal numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations with positive decimals.
    c. Perform techniques of rounding with decimal numbers.
    d. Convert between decimal and percent representations.

    4. Integers
    a. Perform the four basic operations with integers.

    5. Inter-classification
    a. Convert numbers between decimal, fraction, and percent representations.
    b. Place whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers in numerical order.

    6. Applications
    a. Solve a variety of application problems.
    b. Solve basic applications with percents.
    c. Determine the perimeter and area of rectangles and triangles. Determine the volume of a rectangular box. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).

    7. Study Strategies
    a. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    b. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    8. General Skills
    a. Perform all arithmetic operations without use of a calculator.
    b. Use correct order of operations for calculations.
    c. Estimate solutions to problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    d. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    e. Clearly communicate solution processes.
    f. Use a computer to engage in some of the course activities.
  
  • PCADE 072 Beginning Algebra (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Operations with fractions, decimals, percents, and signed numbers. Simplify algebraic expressions. Solve linear equations. Solve a variety of application problems. Square roots, exponents, and coordinate graphing. Determine area, perimeter, and volume. Calculate statistical measures of center and interpret graphs.

    Student Outcomes
    Note: All the outcomes should be performed without a calculator, except as noted.

    Numbers and operations (content A, B, C)
    1. Perform the four basic operations with positive and negative rational numbers expressed in fractional notation and decimal form. Calculate with exponents.
    2. Perform multi-step calculations with rational numbers using the correct order of operations. Place rational numbers in order.
    3. Compute with percents, and interpret results.
    4. Find square roots of perfect squares without a calculator, and use a calculator to find approximate square roots.
    5. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.


    Algebraic expressions – simplification and evaluation (content D, E)
    6. Manipulate basic algebraic expressions, using correct order of operations and combining like terms.
    7. Perform the four basic operations with algebraic fractions (for fractions that have monomial numerator and denominator).
    8. Simplify algebraic exponential expressions involving positive integer exponents.
    9. Evaluate algebraic expressions and formulas without a calculator.
    10. Use a calculator to evaluate numeric expressions, including those with parentheses and exponents.

    Solving linear equations (content F)
    11. Distinguish between algebraic expressions and equations.
    12. Solve one-variable linear equations, including those with grouping symbols and with the variable on both sides.

    Applications (content G)
    13. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions.
    14. Solve a variety of application problems, including the following: Solve application problems involving percents including percent increase/decrease problems and simple interest formula. Solve application problems involving proportions, such as scale drawings or geometric similarity.

    Geometry (content H)
    15. Determine the area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine the volume of rectangular boxes and cylinders. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).
    16. Measure lengths using units of the metric system and the U.S. system.
    17. Convert between units of measure within the metric system and the U.S. system.

    Statistics (content I)
    18. Given data, calculate the mean, median, and mode.
    19. Create graphs to represent data and interpret data represented in statistical graphs.

    Coordinate Graphs (content J)
    20. Graph points on a coordinate axes system. Identify points graphed on a coordinate system, including axes intercepts.
    21. Graph linear equations by plotting points.

    Study Strategies (content K)
    22. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    23. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    General Skills
    24. Estimate solutions to a variety of problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    25. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    26. Clearly communicate solution processes.
  
  • PCADE 080 English for Washington State History (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help you develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. You will demonstrate reading comprehension and reflective thinking, and you will compose explanatory, expository, and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  
  • PCADE 081 Reading/Writing/Communication for Biology (ESL) (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADE 082 Reading/Writing/Communication for Environmental Science (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Construct an annotated bibliography using valid source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADE 083 Reading/Writing/Communication for Modern World History (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    • Demonstrate the ability to communicate opinions and ideas through writing
    • Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning
    • Support points of view with evidence
    • Understand citation/reference formats and requirements
    • Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of the
    information
    • Develop sound sentence structure and proper punctuation usage through
    writing assignments

    READING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Application: cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary
    and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of
    the information.
    • Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether
    earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.
    • Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same
    or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in
    their respective accounts.
    • Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data)
    with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.
    • Application: compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several
    primary and secondary sources.

    WRITING STRAND of College and Career Readiness Standards
    • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or
    texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
    • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and
    information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
    • Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
    effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event
    sequences.
    • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
    and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
    • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
    rewriting, or trying a new approach.
    • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and
    to interact and collaborate with others.
    • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused
    questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
    • Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess
    the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information
    while avoiding plagiarism.
    • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
    reflection, and research.
  
  • PCADE 084 English for US History and Government (5 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS minimum score for Reading/Listening of 211 for ESL

    CASAS minimum score for Reading of 221 for ABE

    Course Description
    This course will help you develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. You will demonstrate reading comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.

  
  • PCADE 085 English for Current World Issues (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and writing skills through reflective essays.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply critical thinking skills, support analysis, and reflect upon events by developing arguments and ideas through writing.
    Cite evidence using disciplinary standards to represent different points of view and support claims.
    Integrate primary and secondary sources to support claims and conclusions.
    Apply the writing process by producing effective and rhetorically appropriate documents in order to meet communicative goals and situational context (formality, subject position, etc.).
    Use computer software for academic purposes in order to compose and communicate effectively.
    Evaluate the credibility of materials in order to develop information competency.
    Determine the meaning and impact of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  
  • PCADE 086 Reading/Writing/Communication for Intro to Physics with Lab (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    • Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection and research
    • Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning
    • Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims
    • Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources
    • Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text
    • Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information
    • Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English
    • Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting
    • Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately
    • Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas
    • Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials
    • Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems
    • Perform research using technology
    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings
  
  • PCADE 087 Reading/Writing/Communication for United States Civics (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning.
    3. Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims.
    4. Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources.
    5. Use a wide range of reading and AVID strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text.
    6. Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information.
    7. Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English.
    8. Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
    9. Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately.
    10. Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas.
    11. Construct an annotated bibliography using valid source materials.
    12. Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems.
    13. Perform research using technology.
    14. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings.
  
  • PCADE 088 Reading/Writing/Communication for Earth Chemistry (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills at the high school level. Students will demonstrate their reading for comprehension and reflective thinking as well as writing through explanatory, expository and argumentative writings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Communicate opinions and ideas through writing to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    2. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by organizing and analyzing information and reflecting upon its meaning.
    3. Use evidence representing different points of view to support claims.
    4. Apply standard rules of citation to properly format papers and credit sources.
    5. Use a wide range of reading and writing strategies and routines to provide an accurate summary of the text.
    6. Integrate prior knowledge with new information to deepen synthesis of information.
    7. Develop clear and focused sentence and paragraph structures using proper punctuation and mechanics of written English.
    8. Develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, and rewriting.
    9. Summarize, paraphrase, and quote accurately.
    10. Document and use primary and secondary sources to support main ideas.
    11. Evaluate, summarize, and cite source materials.
    12. Use computer skills/programs for academic purposes such as word processing, email, and learning management systems.
    13. Perform research using technology.
    14. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices including words on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings.
  
  • PCADE 089 Pre-Academic Grammar and Writing (ESL) (2 credits)



    Prerequisite ESL Level 5-6 or ABE Levels 3-6.

    Course Description
    Designed for you to learn and/or review grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and writing strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write sentences using different sentence patterns.
    2. Use the elements of sentence construction (e.g. subjects, predicates, nouns, verbs, etc.) in accordance with communicative goals.
    3. Proofread and correct common grammar and punctuation errors (e.g., subject/verb agreement, capital letters, punctuation, verb tense and parallelism, pronoun types and agreement) as part of the writing process.
    4. Recognize genre differences in various styles of writing in order to analyze the differences in styles.
    5. Apply coherence, unity, sentence variety, and clarity in reading and writing.
    6. Refine the writing process by planning/prewriting, revising/editing, and rewriting.
  
  • PCADE 090 Foundations for Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills and goal setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze effectiveness of self-management skills, including time management techniques and setting goals to monitor progress.
    2. Discuss and apply effective study skills to improve study habits.
    3. Access technological resources available through Pierce College to allow online engagement inside and outside the classroom.
  
  • PCADE 091 Foundations for Ongoing Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills, and goal setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Access technological resources to utilize them for common academic tasks (uploading multiple file types, familiarity with Canvas, etc).
    2. Be able to describe preparation and study techniques suitable for an academic class.
    3. Implement effective reading comprehension strategies including: how to evaluate reading comprehension roadblocks and choose an appropriate action plan in order to build metacognitive awareness.
    4. Evaluate individual progress through self-reflection.
    5.  Review and evaluate personal Guided Pathway progress in order to either affirm a pathway or change to a different pathway.
  
  • PCADE 094 Survey in Art History (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Survey in Art History is a general introduction to the chronological development of art from paleolithic cave paintings to the present. Topics include a comprehensive look at art and architecture as interpretations of a changing world.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the four components of art criticism (describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate) in order to look at art as it exists in the world and to develop a personal appreciation of art.
    2. Apply knowledge of major periods and artists in art history in order to analyze how culture, place, time, and context impact art, and how art impacts culture, place, time, and context.
    3. Communicate ideas related to art history and artistic styles using multiple methods.
    4. Interrogate one’s own identities/positionalities, privileges, biases, and perspectives in relation to art.
  
  • PCADE 095 Foundations in Visual Art (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Foundations in Visual Art is an investigation into the components of art to include a study of aesthetics, the nature of art, and its functions and purposes; critical analysis of the elements and principles of art and design, interpretation, and evaluation of artwork; art history; and art production. The course is designed to enrich through discovery and creative problem-solving while providing an overview of the role of the artist in interpreting and contributing to culture from local and global perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply basic art vocabulary and concepts.
    2. Analyze art within culture, place, and time.
    3. Identify characteristics of artistic styles of individual artists within various cultures.
    4. Describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate art.
    5. Apply various art media and processes in making works of art.
    6. Investigate academic and career paths related to the visual arts.
    7. Respond to art orally and in writing.
  
  • PCADE 096 Fitness and Wellness (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A comprehensive study of the following wellness components: Fitness, Nutrition, Stress Management, and Disease Prevention. This course will assist students with the necessary protocols to independently improve cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Students achieve this goal by utilizing the varied fitness resources available in the Health Education Center as well as the natural environment of the Pierce College campuses.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the five components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
    2. Identify and define the elements that comprise the Wellness paradigm and synthesize these multiple lifestyle factors into a broader concept for oneself.
    3. Describe the concept of one’s own wellness in contrast to the simple absence of disease.
    4. Discuss how a regular exercise program and a healthy nutritional lifestyle impacts one’s health.
    5. Describe how to safely monitor exercise intensity.
    6. Design and implement a personal fitness program that addresses all five components of fitness in terms of intensity, duration and frequency.
    7. Evaluate personal fitness improvement from previous fitness levels based upon aerobic capacity assessment.
    8. Obtain the appropriate management strategies needed to handle stress.
    9. Describe the known causes of disease and manageable prevention strategies.
  
  • PCADE 097 PCAD Advanced Fitness and Wellness (ESL) (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An advanced study of the following wellness components: Fitness, Nutrition, Stress Management, and Disease Prevention. This course will assist students in the continuation of self-implementation of the necessary protocols to independently improve cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. Students work to maintain their goals by utilizing the varied fitness resources available in the Health Education Center as well as the natural environment of the Pierce College campuses.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the five components of fitness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
    2. Identify and define the elements that comprise the Wellness paradigm and synthesize these multiple lifestyle factors into a broader concept for oneself.
    3. Describe the concept of one’s own wellness in contrast to the simple absence of disease.
    4. Discuss how a regular exercise program and a healthy nutritional lifestyle impacts one’s health.
    5. Describe how to safely monitor exercise intensity.
    6. Design and implement a personal fitness program that addresses all five components of fitness in terms of intensity, duration and frequency.
    7. Evaluate personal fitness improvement from previous fitness levels based upon aerobic capacity assessment.
    8. Obtain the appropriate management strategies needed to handle stress.
    9. Describe the known causes of disease and manageable prevention strategies.
  
  • PCADE 098 PCAD Service Learning Pathway Exploration (ESL) (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Pierce College Adult Diploma program.

    Course Description
    Through completing a service project students will gain insight into career pathways and their role in society. Students will investigate expectations of real-world employers. The volunteer experience will be evaluated through career, community, and personal perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate values, interests, and strengths to identify or affirm a career pathway.
    2. Research job outlooks within a career pathway.
    3. Discuss the role the chosen career has in society.
    4. Investigate community needs and resources using a variety of information-gathering methods and sources.
    5. Identify behavior expectations and soft skills needed when working in a particular career.
    6. Participate in a service project related to the chosen career pathway.
    7. Reflect on personal impacts of participation in the service activity.
    8. Integrate personal learning and volunteer experience into decision-making regarding the chosen career pathway.

Political Science

  
  • POLS 208 US Campaigns and Elections (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course will explore various features of political campaigns and elections in America. Topics include: voter behavior, public opinion, the role of money, media and interest groups in campaigns, and the relationship of elections to policy outcomes.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze strategies and features of American political campaigns, including money, media and interest groups.
    2. Evaluate voter behavior and public opinion.
    3. Identify rules governing American elections- including Constitution, state and federal law and party policies.
    4. Explain the different perspectives of the history of elections in the United States.
    5. Recognize and evaluate the role of parties in shaping opinion and mobilizing voters.
    6. Recognize and evaluate the role of elections in shaping policy outcomes and government behavior.
    7. Evaluate relationship of American elections to standards of democratic governance.
    8. Identify the philosophy and policies of major candidates and parties.
    9. Articulate their own views in relation to public opinion and party platforms.
    10. Recognize opportunities to participate in elections and help shape electoral results
  
  • POLS 230 State and Local Government (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course looks at the different levels of government in the United States system, with emphasis on the state and local level, including their power, structure and how they interact. The constitution and politics of the government in Washington state will receive particular attention.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the elements of federalism and role of state and local politics in determining the relationships among states and between states and the national government.
    2. Compare the characteristics of state constitutions and the elements of constitutional politics in the states.
    3. Explain the impact of the people upon the state, including initiatives and referenda, and identify the effects of party politics upon the functioning of state governments.
    4. Analyze the prerogatives, perquisites, and power of legislators and governors.
    5. Describe the federal case decisions that most affected state courts and analyze what the impacts of these decisions were.
    6. Identify and discuss the most common influences on local government decision-making and the general impact of each of these influences.
    7. Identify and discuss the most common forms of metropolitan government and their advantages and disadvantages.
  
  • POLS& 101 Introduction Political Science (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly POLS 201 -CCN

    Course Description
    A comparative analysis of the various forms of government and politics in the world together with an introduction to the terms and concepts of political science.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and analyze important Political Science terms and concepts necessary for comprehension of subject matter and for further study in the discipline.
    2. Articulate one’s own political views in a clear, thoughtful and comprehensive way.
    3. Use political science theories to interpret and explain political issues.
    4. Identify and analyze the strengths and weakness of political systems in different countries
    5. Compare and contrast different theories of order in the international system and apply to current global events.
    6. Demonstrate an awareness of how culture shapes political actions and values in different countries.
    7. Analyze differences between political ideologies.
    8. Evaluate policy options using the concepts of justice and effectiveness.
    9. Engage with people holding differing views in a manner that is frank, respectful, and productive.
  
  • POLS& 200 Introduction to Law (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly LAW 205 - CCN

    Prerequisite ENGL& 101 , or BTECA 115 , with at least a 2.0 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the nature of law and the operation of the legal system; includes discussion of representative substantive law and analysis of the interaction between legal institutions and interest groups.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Summarize legal cases
    2. Contrast major classifications of law
    3. Appraise the impact of the legal profession on society
    4. Differentiate the organizational structures of the major types of legal institutions
    5. Assess the performance of personnel unique to the major types of legal institutions
    6. Evaluate procedural law characterizing the major types of legal institutions
    7. Evaluate substantive law created by the major types of legal institutions
    8. Analyze the interaction of stakeholders and legal institutions on one another
  
  • POLS& 202 American Government (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly POLS 202 - CCN

    Course Description
    A description and analysis of the institutions, processes, and ideas that make up the American political and governmental system.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define important Political Science terms and concepts necessary for the comprehension of subject matter and for further study in the discipline.
    2. Analyze the historical factors that led to the creation of the United States’ political system and Constitution.
    3. Apply the principles of the US Constitution to identify the powers of government institutions and the rights of individuals and groups.
    4. Identify the political, historical and contextual factors that shape the power of individuals, groups and institutions.
    5. Define the power arrangement between national and sub-national governments within confederate, federal and unitary governmental systems.
    6. Explain the formal and informal influences of the law-making process including the creation, passage and execution of bills into laws.
    7. Articulate differences between American political ideologies and situate one’s own beliefs in relation to them.
    8. Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of US campaigns and elections.
    9. Distinguish between high quality and low quality sources of political information.
    10. Identify and evaluate the varieties of bias in the media.
    11. Identify the ideologies and bases of support of the main political parties in the United States, as well as how these have changed over time.
    12. Analyze the evolution of civil rights and civil liberties in the United States.
    13. Critique the extent to which current American political institutions and practices measure up to democratic principles.
    14. Advocate for one’s own views effectively and civilly.
    15. Evaluate how the rules, institutions and operation of the US political system differentially impacts the rights and opportunities of individuals and groups in the United States.
    16. Apply political science concepts and theories to the interpretation of current events and controversies in American politics.
  
  • POLS& 203 International Relations (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly POLS 203 -CCN

    Course Description
    Develop the ability to identify terms and concepts common to international relations; analyze problems inherent in a multi-polar, interdependent nation-state political system; evaluate ways in which global actors attempt to address these problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Describe, define and give examples of political terms and concepts in international relations.
    2.  Use theories of international relation to analyze international phenomena and current international issues.
    3.  Explain the patterns of power, stability and change in the international political system.
    4.  Explain the causes and consequences of war.
    5.  Describe the impact of international economic, environmental and social forces on individual welfare.
    6.  Use cultural differences to explain global variations in values and behavior.

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 192 Career Development: Theory and Application (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Rooted in Psychological Career Development theories, students will study and apply theoretical approaches of self and career exploration. Additional application will include cognitive processes, adjustment theory and developmental factors that enable and affirm a decision making process necessary to research, discern and identify career and/or vocational paths that are consistent with results. Career Development theories will include: Personality, Trait-Factor, Developmental and Social-Family of Origin. Class includes administration and professional interpretation of APA endorsed personality, values and interest assessments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify, describe and accurately apply Career Developmental Theories.
    2. Accurately apply 5 career development theories to their life situation and career planning process.
    3. Assess specific personality characteristics, interests, aptitudes, values, and decision-making traits using formal assessment tools.
    4. Inventory, identify, and prioritize transferable skills and areas of expertise as determined by personality, developmental and trait-factor theories.
    5. Create a career path that clearly identifies potential careers or positions of interest
    6. Research and identify educational requirements, specific professional licensing, registrations, etc. needed for various careers or positions of interest.
    7. Conduct a minimum of three informational interviews with professionals in their career pathway of interest.
  
  • PSYC 201 Psychology of Personal Growth (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 201

    Course Description
    The study of personality, adjustment, love and relationships, self-actualization and the application of psychological principles to problems met by normal people in everyday life.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use active listening skills consistently and intentionally.
    2. Describe one’s self in terms of models of the self, self-concept, and self-esteem.
    3. Apply models of identity development to one’s life and identify factors in upbringing that contribute to one’s identity.

    4. Discuss usefulness of personality descriptions of self that are derived from personality assessment tools.
    5. Describe emotions separate from responses to emotions and identify own pattern of emotional responses.
    6. Identify stressors in one’s life and patterns of reaction to stress and generate alternatives for reducing stress or changing responses to it.

    7. Describe one’s self in terms of models of the sexual identity development.
    8. Contrast family systems theory with individual-centered approaches and describe patterns in one’s own family of origin.

    9. Discuss ways to evaluate intensity of psychological issues in one’s life and role of therapy and other interventions relative to intensity.

    10. Compare and contrast symptoms associated with types of disorders.
    11. Describe examples of differing conflict patterns from one’s life and generate options for resolving conflict based on models of conflict management.

    12. Assist classmates in creating descriptive, meaningful examples of course concepts in their lives.
    13. Compare and contrast the experience of others in relation to course content in a way that highlights important similarities and differences across cultures.

    14. For areas of concern to the student (e.g. stress, conflict, family patterns), construct a plan for changing one’s own behavior and assessing change.

    15. Conduct informed observations of human behavior demonstrating an awareness of the cultural context in which human behavior occurs.
  
  • PSYC 210 Social Psychology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 210

    Prerequisite PSYC& 100  or PSYC 201 , with a 1.5 grade or better.

    Course Description
    A survey of the effects of social influence on an individual’s thoughts and/or behaviors.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Describe concepts in social psychology (e.g. attributions, obedience, conformity, institution.)
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class presentations, class discussions, group activities, program proposals)
    2. Explain main findings on topics in social psychology (e.g. classic studies such as Milgram’s obedience study, Rosenthal & Jacobson’s sex role studies).
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, program proposals)
    3. Describe the influences group structure has on social interaction.
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, program proposals)
    4. Apply concepts in social psychology to everyday behavior of self, others and current events.
    (essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals)
    5. Evaluate results of research in social psychology based on its methodology, relevance to theory, and relevance to social issues.
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, program proposals)
    6. Identify judgments made in creating knowledge in social psychology and evaluate the impact of those judgments.
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussion, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals, white papers-policy statement)
    7. Evaluate research designs used to study social psychological topics at a basic level (e.g. the ability to achieve appropriate information).
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussion, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals, white papers-policy statement)
    8. Conduct informed observations of human behavior with awareness of the cultural context in which human behavior occurs.
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussion, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals, white papers-policy statement)
    9. Discuss personal experience that formed opinions and attitudes on class topics.
    (research projects/papers, essays in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals)
    10. Generate potential social contexts that would provide a broader base for one’s opinions and behavioral tendencies (i.e. different past experiences and future opportunities)
    (essays, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, journals/reflective essays)
    11. Identify the cultural and historical forces which can be attributed to shaping social psychological concepts and (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussion, group activities, journals/reflective essays, program proposals, white papers-policy statement)
    12. Describe the main issues and ideas behind them that shaped the field of social psychology (e.g. the person-situation debate, lab/field methodologies).
    (research projects/papers, essays, objective exams, in-class presentations, class discussions, group activities, program proposals)
    13. Appreciate and apprehend the complexity of human experience; practice thinking about the many factors that go into each person’s life.
    (journals/reflective essays)
  
  • PSYC 215 Group Experience (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 215

    Prerequisite A grade of 1.5 or better in PSYC& 100 , or SSMH 100 , or SSMH 170  or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Small group theory and practice designed to further develop the student’s ability to lead counseling groups in the social service/mental health professions. Active listening, group dynamics and group theory in psychology.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize, demonstrate and explain key terms and concepts from the Person-Centered Counseling model.
    2. Apply the theoretical concepts discussed in outcome 1 by using them to facilitate an in-class group, under the supervision of the instructor.
    3. Select and use recognized counseling approaches and be able to articulate the usefulness of the given approach(es) in specific group counseling situations.
    4. Select and use specific counseling techniques learned in the class and be able to articulate the utility of the given technique(s) in specific group counseling situations.
    5. Articulate his or her own counseling strengths and limitations relative to leadership of group counseling sessions and integrate feedback from the supervisor and group members.
    6. Conduct at least one in-class counseling group utilizing the client-centered model of Carl Rogers.
    7. Effectively use the active listening skills learned in the course.
  
  • PSYC 230 Intro to Personality (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 230

    Prerequisite PSYC& 100  or PSYC 201 , with a 1.5 grade or better.

    Course Description
    A survey of contemporary personality theory, assessment and change.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the difference between research-focused and theory-focused emphases in personality psychology.
    2. Describe the basic theoretical concepts of major theorists/theoretical approaches, including the background of theorist and its impact on theory.
    3. Describe the components of major theoretical approaches, which include the dynamics, constructs, and developmental issues.
    4. Describe the theoretical approach’s major mode of inquiry and clinical methodology.
    5. Describe the major criticisms leveled against each theoretical approach.
    6. Explain and interrelate the theoretical approach with its components.
    7. Apply a theoretical approach and its components to contemporary issues in personality (e.g. parental and child-
    rearing style, sexual identification, self-concept, achievement, interpersonal relationships, work and mental illness).
    8. Analyze critical psychosocial issues (e.g. obedience, aggression, and anxieties) from a personality perspective.
    9. Distinguish among a variety of personality assessment strategies by identifying the following for major test batteries: format, mode of delivery, rationale for test’s use, limitations of test.
    10. Compare and contrast the personality assessment strategies with principles of research methods in psychology.
  
  • PSYC& 100 General Psychology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 110 - CCN

    Course Description
    Scientific study of animal behavior and experience. Both biological and social basics of behavior are covered with emphasis on heredity, neurology, motivation, emotion, perception, cognition, learning, and intelligence.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate reasonableness of psychology-related information received from media, friends and family, and professionals based on general types of research knowledge.
    2. Describe practical information about learning, memory, thinking, and learning styles and design ways to apply that information to student’s educational career.
    3. Apply and compare the major perspectives of psychology and how the perspectives have shaped which research questions have been asked.
    4. Design basic research proposals for psychological study of phenomena, including explanations of decisions and judgments involved in research and their effect on the knowledge obtained from them.
    5. Apply understanding of research methods to psychological research encountered in everyday discourse and the media.
    6. Appreciate the complexity of human behavior.
    7. More carefully observe and describe psychological phenomena.

    For each of the following content areas (D thru H), the instructor will select at least two outcomes, with an expectation of more depth in one area.

    Content area D. Biological Psychology, Sensation and Perception:
    8. Identify different parts of the peripheral nervous system (e.g. sympathetic and parasympathetic) and discuss their functioning in everyday behaviors.
    9. Identify major brain areas and their associated functions.
    10. Evaluate the reasonableness of popular claims about brain function (e.g. drawing on the right side of the brain).
    11. Describe and compare brain areas involved in everyday activities.
    12. Describe major processes of neuron firing and key characteristics of that process (e.g. all-or-none principle).
    13. Explain process of synaptic transmission.
    14. Explain several effects of psychoactive drugs on synaptic transmissions and deduce other reasonable effects on the process in the synaptic gap.
    15. Identify some of the types of complexity involved in the nervous system.
    16. Explain main mechanisms of genetic transmission and major arguments regarding heritability of traits and social behavior patterns.
    17. Explain how senses transform various forms of energy into nerve impulses and associated effects (e.g. just noticeable difference).
    18. Compare and contrast how senses transform various forms of energy into nerve impulses.
    19. Describe major groups of perceptual processes (e.g. Gestalt, monocular cues) and apply to real life stimuli (e.g. photographs, magic eye pictures, hazy day effects).

    Content area E. Learning, Memory, Cognition, and Language
    20. Compare and contrast classical conditioning, operant conditioning, observational learning, and latent learning.
    21. Explain main variations to each model (e.g. partial reinforcement schedules, stimulus discrimination and generalization).
    22. Sketch interventions to change simple behaviors based on learning principles (preliminary design).
    23. Identify common issues, conflicts, and cultural values inherent in interventions.
    24. Describe models of memory, including major parts of sensory, short-term, and long-term memory as currently perceived by the field.
    25. Explain common memory phenomena (i.e. what we remember and forget in everyday life) in terms of models of memory.
    26. Explain own study habits and those of peers in terms of models of memory.
    27. Design (construct) alternative learning habits based upon principles of memory.
    28. Design class review sessions based on principles of memory or learning.
    29. Describe ways of testing intelligence.
    30. Describe major pieces of evidence related to major arguments about testing intelligence.
    31. Compare and contrast algorithms and heuristics.
    32. Describe examples of cognitive heuristics in every day life.
    33. Discuss the importance of the distinction between grammar and vocabulary.
    34. Explain at least one aspect of language development in terms of nature (genetic) and nurture (environmental) determinants.

    Content area F. Emotion, Motivation, Personality and Development
    35. Compare and contrast emotional experiences using a model that separates parts of an emotion.
    36. Describe research that manipulates one aspect of an emotion and its affect on other parts and the overall emotional experience.
    37. Identify major theories of motivation.
    38. Give examples of ways innate drives (e.g. hunger, thirst) are universal and ways they are shaped by experience.
    39. Identify major aspects of the sender, message and receiver that impact how a message transforms in transmission.
    40. Give examples of multiple communication styles in the same situation.
    41. Differentiate between a style (tendency or emphasis) and individual behaviors.
    42. Identify major theories of development (e.g., Erikson, Piaget, Vygotsky).
    43. Describe the fundamental quality of life that changes in one major stage theory.
    44. Discuss the value of stage theories.
    45. Identify underlying mechanism that drives personality in major theories of personality.
    46. Compare and contrast the major perspectives of personality.

    Content area G. Therapy, Disorders, and Stress
    47. Apply the general criteria for diagnosing disorders to a case study, noting value judgments inherent in the process.
    48. Apply set of criteria for any particular disorder as a set to a case study.
    49. Compare and contrast at least two types of therapy, including distinguishing example excerpts from each.
    50. Identify ways in which therapy settings reinforce cultural norms around giving and receiving help.
    51. Discuss the role of therapy in societal function.
    52. Identify major approaches to stress and coping, including which types of stress the research for each approach has tended to emphasize.

    Content area H. Social Psychology, Gender, and Sexuality
    53. Explain at least one aspect of gender or gender identity in terms of nature (genetic) and nurture (environmental) determinants.
    54. Distinguish among categorization, stereotype, prejudice and discrimination.
    55. Distinguish in examples between different processes of prejudice including aversive racism, internalized oppression, individual, and institutional racism.
    56. Describe common tendencies in interpreting the social world (e.g., the fundamental attribution error) and its impact on future behavior.
    57. Identify aspects of a situation likely to increase or decrease conformity and obedience.

    58. Identify and distinguish the effects of different factors affecting small group behavior in applied situations.
    59. Contrast evidence for a social construction and biological construction of gender in different areas of behavior (e.g., cognitive, social).
    60. Identify main factors in attractions and dating.
  
  • PSYC& 180 Human Sexuality (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 225 - CCN

    Course Description
    Human sexual behavior covering the psychological, biological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Recognize and explain the historic cultural influences on sexuality attitudes and values.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    2. Evaluate, recognize and explain effective communication in relationships, and how to build a loving relationship.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    3. Recognize, characterize and explain anatomical sexual systems and the physical problems that can occur.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    4. Identify, recognize and characterize gender, genetic, and sexual issues with which people must deal.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    5. Identify, recognize, and characterize sexual diseases dysfunctions and their treatments.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    6. Identify and recognize the legal issues, paraphilias, and commercial issues that surround sexuality.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
  
  • PSYC& 200 Lifespan Psychology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 205 - CCN

    Prerequisite PSYC& 100  or PSYC 201 , with a 1.5 grade or better.

    Course Description
    A lifespan study of human growth and development, providing a broad understanding of the human life cycle through contributions of psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology, and medicine.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe major theoretical traditions in developmental psychology.
    2. Evaluate relevance of concepts from major theoretical traditions as they apply to specific issues in human development.
    3. Apply the interactional model of nature/nurture to specific issues in human development.
    4. Evaluate usefulness of the application of scientific research to current issues in human development.
    5. Compare and contrast information from scientific research with information from personal experience and original research related to current issues in human development.
    6. Identify common patterns of development, including specific milestone achievements in different areas of development (physical, cognitive, social and emotional) across lifespan.
    7. Identify important cultural variations in different areas of development (physical, cognitive, social and emotional) across the lifespan.
    8. Discuss impact of concepts from one area of development (i.e. physical, cognitive, social and emotional development) on other areas.
    9. Outline an argument that synthesizes individual, family and societal factors that impact on a current topic of interest in developmental psychology.
    10. Compare evidence and practices regarding treatment of children in the United States to cultural myths regarding the value and treatment of children.
    11. Reflect on students’ own values regarding children, including potential actions and/or interventions based upon this analysis.
    12. Compare evidence regarding treatment of humans in various developmental stages in the United States to cultural myths regarding their value and treatment.
  
  • PSYC& 220 Abnormal Psychology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly PSYCH 235 - CCN

    Prerequisite PSYC& 100  or PSYC 201 , with a 1.5 grade or better.

    Course Description
    A study of the history, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behavior.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate the significant signs and symptoms associated with five major types of mental illness: Schizophrenic, affective, personality, anxiety, and dissociative disorders.
    2. Explain the notion of criteria in psychological judgments.
    3. Apply a diagnosis, cause, and treatment model to specific disorders in abnormal psychology.
    4. Evaluate the usefulness of the application of scientific research to current issues in abnormal psychology.
    5. Apply the concept of treatment matching to case studies, identifying multiple causes of psychological problems and matching components of current treatments to proposed problems.
    6. Identify current understanding of the causes of disorders and apply that understanding to prevention.
    7. Identify important cultural variations in the occurrence of psychological disorders.
    8. Outline an argument that synthesizes individual, family and societal factors that impact a current topic of interest in abnormal psychology.
    9. Identify the axes of the DSM and apply some of its broad categories to case studies.
    10. Describe the concept of differential diagnosis and apply to some disorders.
    11. Compare and contrast the activity of categorizing disorders as a tool for organizing information with its potential for stereotyping and labeling.
    12. Discuss social factors that impact diagnosis in modern settings (e.g. school referrals, legal situations).
    13. Identify major historical trends in the treatments of disorders, and discuss multiple causes for changes in treatments.
    14. Compare and contrast the institution of therapy as a tool for helping individuals with its use as a social control mechanism.
    15. Reflect on one’s values regarding mental disorders, including potential actions and/or interventions based upon this analysis.
    16. Conduct informed observations of human behavior demonstrating an awareness of the cultural context in which human behavior occurs.
    17. Find relevant information from standard reference texts on psychological disorders (e.g. DSM, DSM Casebook).

Reading

  
  • READ 099 Reading for College (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Placement assessment.

    Course Description
    Transition to college-level reading through developing a variety of reading skills for academic and career purposes as well as personal enrichment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use context clues and word structures to identify word meanings and develop reading fluency
    2. Purposefully use a range of strategies (visualizing, predicting, clarifying, questioning, paraphrasing, connecting, etc.)
    3. Use “Think Aloud,” “Talk to the Text,” and other Reading Apprenticeship (RA) routines to strategically solve reading problems
    4. Apply RA routines to texts from other courses
    5. Identify thesis statements, central points, assertions, and arguments in texts
    6. Identify conventions and formatting in order to analyze various texts
    7. Draw inferences and conclusions based on textual evidence
    8. Summarize central points
    9. Set a purpose for reading and adjust strategies accordingly
    10. Summarize and critique the content of various texts
    11. Adjust reading process by reflecting in writing on his or her own reading strategies
    12. Recognize rhetorical situations and evaluate arguments and other forms of persuasion
    13. Use metacognitive awareness in order to discuss and monitor thinking and problem-solving processes

Service Learning

  
  • SL 100 Service Learning (0 credits)



    Course Description
    Direct or indirect service experience that supports student learning outcomes in a specific course.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify needs in a community.
    2. Participate in a service experience.
    3. Document service experience.
    4. Connect service experience to student learning outcomes in co-enrolled course.

Social Service/Mental Health

  
  • SSMH 100 Introduction to Human Services (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of social service field history, philosophy, theory, and exploration of career paths, values, education, and skills needed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define what is meant by the term “human services” and Identify characteristics associated with the effective human services worker.
    2. Summarize Maslow’s model of hierarchical needs and explain the potential relationship between human needs and the role of professional helping.
    3. Discuss the concept of adult development, both in the context of her or his own learning and in relation to human service work with adults.
    4 Discuss a range of motivations for why people enter the helping fields, reflect upon his or her own reasons for considering a career in this field, and make a basic assessment about his or her own motivations.
    5. Identify and explain key principles of a systemic approach to understanding human behavior, such as general systems theory.
    6. Identify key people and events which have come to be associated with the historical development of professional helping in the United States and discuss the role of each.
    7. Identify the degree to which the formal history of human services and mental health appropriately credits the contributions of all groups of people.
    8. Reflect upon the development of professional human services in the context of human needs, human motivation, history, and social conditions.
    9. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the psychological theoretical foundations of human services, including defining “theory,” defining “hypothesis,” explaining how concepts are operationalized in the testing of hypotheses, as well as identifying and explaining key concepts and constructs as used in various theories, which have been influential in human services (Freudian, behavioral, cognitive behavioral, family systems, and humanistic).
    10. Identify and discuss the strengths and limitations of each of the theory discussed including; Freudian, behavioral, cognitive behavioral, family systems, and humanistic.
    11. Articulate how divergent theoretical approaches have been integrated into the present-day field of human services.
    12. Describe the personal qualities and competencies that are associated with effective service to others and Identify ways in which specific competencies can and have been integrated into models for teaching human service skills.
    13. Explain the significance of the development of competency-based approaches in human services.
    14. Describe how increased knowledge of, and understanding about, diverse groups of people can contribute to competence in working with them.
    15. Define “crisis” from a human services perspective, distinguish development and situational forms; describe phases of crisis; and, identify some of the skills and principles associated with managing crisis.
    16. Summarize the range of jobs available in the fields of social service and mental health, including educational requirements, training opportunities, earnings, availability of positions, and salaries.
    17. Identify those personal values which might provide motivation to serve others in the fields of social service and mental health.
  
  • SSMH 125 Observation and Intervention Skills (4 credits)



    Course Description
    Behavioral observation and recording techniques, report formats, interview styles, basic behavior management and referral techniques.

  
  • SSMH 170 Mental Health Interviewing and Assessment (5 credits)



    Prerequisite SSMH 100  with at least a 2.0 grade; SSMH 215  recommended.

    Course Description
    Introduction to helping skills and interpersonal communication as used in community mental health settings. Students will learn basic communications, interviewing, & assessment skills as used in community mental health settings.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of principles of intentional interviewing, including concepts on intentionality, operationalization of qualities believed associated with effective interviewing, and the micro-skills model.
    2. Describe how the micro-skills model can be used to develop interviewing strategies that will be more effective with people from diverse cultural backgrounds.
    3. Differentiate between attending skills (aka rapport/relationship building) skills and influencing skills (i.e. skills in which the interviewer exerts direct influence)
    4. Identify when it is possible to shift from a reflective interviewing strategy to the use of direct influence.
    5. Identify and define each of the specific attending skills covered in class, such as paraphrase, summarization, reflection of feeling, and identify the functions of each.
    6. Identify and define each of the specific influencing skills covered in class, such as directives, logical-and-natural-consequences, confrontation, and identify the functions of each.
    7. Demonstrate a basic understanding of how the medical model is typically applied in psychiatry and the field of mental health, to include such concepts as functional and organic, disease process, disorder, signs, and symptoms.
    8. Differentiate between psychiatric evaluation, psychological assessment, and mental health intake assessments.
    9. Summarize the four major questions addressed by use of the formal and informal mental status examination
    10. Describe the basic organization of the current edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association, including major types of disorder, multi-axial nature of the manual, and how five digit coding is done.
    11. Summarize the primary components of the Problem Oriented Record System, and demonstrate an understanding of how information in one part is used in others.
    12. With 70% accuracy, demonstrate the ability to employ each of the attending and influencing skills covered in this course, as measured by the evaluation of a final audio taped interviewed, using a standard scoring form.
    13. Complete a basic intake evaluation form, including identification of specific problems, developmental history, and psychosocial history as demonstrated by use of a typical mental health intake evaluation form (specific DSM diagnosis not included).
    14. Complete a treatment plan, using problems identified on the intake evaluation as demonstrated by submission of a treatment plan using a standard form provided for this purpose.
    15. Complete a treatment review, addressing identified problem and the effectiveness of the treatment plan using a standard form provided for this purpose.
  
  • SSMH 185 Identity and Values in the Family (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrolled in the SSMH program, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Exploration of the formation of identity, values, and self-concept in a family context including exploration of personal family history, cultural, and attitudinal factors.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define identity in the context of personal characteristics, family dynamics, and cultural norms.
    2. Describe how power and powerlessness contribute to personal, group, and/or cultural identity.
    3. Describe and identify theoretical models related to identity in the family such as Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, Johari Window, and Minority Identity Model.
    4. Describe how family-centered problems, like child abuse, domestic violence, and addictions, influence identity.
    5. Explain the dynamics of Family Systems Theory.
    6. Describe issues related to children growing up in situations other than their family of origin, particularly as they relate to cross-racial adoption.
  
  • SSMH 201 Social Service-Mental Health Field Experience 1 (5 credits)



    Prerequisite SSMH 100, SSMH 170, AND SSMH 215 with a grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A career-related work experience, under qualified supervision, introducing the student in application of professional/technical knowledge, values, and skills as preparation for employment in the social service-mental health field.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Complete 120 hours of service in a social service-mental health agency, with an emphasis on direct client contact, under the supervision of a human service professional.
    2. Develop an individualized learning plan, which outlines a set of measurable and observable outcomes that will be accomplished by the end of the field experience, in consultation with the agency supervisor and a faculty member of the Social Service/Mental Health program.
    3. Maintain a log of hours and a journal which documents the ability to reflect upon significant aspects of the field including the following: respect for client confidentiality, the ability to use recognized interviewing skills, the ability to make such basic assessments as would be included in a formal or informal mental status examination and/or activities of daily living (ADLs), adherence to agency policies, compliance with federal and state laws governing human services, participation in treatment and/or service teams, articulation with various community agencies and programs.
    4. Make at least one satisfactory case presentation in which the student identifies and explains associations between concepts and skills previously learned in the classroom and that which is being learned in the field experience setting.
    5. Reflect upon and respond to a formal evaluation of their performance, completed by their field site supervisor.
    6. Complete a self evaluation of the field experience, based upon completion of the outcomes articulated in the learning plan, their own subjective impressions, as well as feedback from peers, supervisor, and the instructor.
    7. Develop a professional resume aimed at summarizing his or her educational and experience qualifications for employment in the fields of social service and/or mental health.
  
  • SSMH 202 Social Service-Mental Health Field Experience 2 (5 credits)



    Prerequisite SSMH 201 with a 2.0 grade or higher,  instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A career-related work experience, under qualified supervision, developing the student’s skills in applying professional/technical knowledge, values, and skills as preparation for employment in the social service-mental health field.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Complete 120 hours of service in a social service-mental health agency, with an emphasis on direct client contact, under the supervision of a human service professional.
    2. Develop an individualized learning plan, which outlines a set of measurable and observable outcomes that will be accomplished by the end of the field experience, in consultation with the agency supervisor and a faculty member of the Social Service/Mental Health program.
    3. Maintain a log of hours and a journal which documents the ability to reflect upon significant aspects of the field including the following: respect for client confidentiality, the ability to use recognized interviewing skills,
    the ability to make such basic assessments as would be included in a formal or informal mental status examination and/or activities of daily living (ADLs), adherence to agency policies, compliance with federal and state laws governing human services, participation in treatment and/or service teams, articulation with various community agencies and programs.
    4. Make at least one satisfactory case presentation in which the student identifies and explains associations between concepts and skills previously learned in the classroom and that which is being learned in the field experience setting.
    5. Reflect upon and respond to a formal evaluation of their performance, completed by their field site supervisor.
    6. Complete a self evaluation of the field experience, based upon completion of the outcomes articulated in the learning plan, their own subjective impressions, as well as feedback from peers, supervisor, and the instructor.
    7. Develop a professional resume aimed at summarizing his or her educational and experience qualifications for employment in the fields of social service and/or mental health.
  
  • SSMH 203 Social Service-Mental Health Field Experience 3 (5 credits)



    Prerequisite SSMH 202 with a 2.0 grade or higher,  instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A career-related work experience, under qualified supervision, further developing the student to apply competent entry-level professional/technical knowledge, values, and skills as preparation for employment in the social service-mental health field.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Complete 120 hours of service in a social service-mental health agency, with an emphasis on direct client contact, under the supervision of a human service professional.
    2. Develop an individualized learning plan, which outlines a set of measurable and observable outcomes that will be accomplished by the end of the field experience, in consultation with the agency supervisor and a faculty member of the Social Service/Mental Health program.
    3. Maintain a log of hours and a journal which documents the ability to reflect upon significant aspects of the field including the following: respect for client confidentiality, the ability to use recognized interviewing skills, the ability to make such basic assessments as would be included in a formal or informal mental status examination and/or activities of daily living (ADLs), adherence to agency policies, compliance with federal and state laws governing human services, participation in treatment and/or service teams, articulation with various community agencies and programs.
    4. Make at least one satisfactory case presentation in which the student identifies and explains associations between concepts and skills previously learned in the classroom and that which is being learned in the field experience setting.
    5. Reflect upon and respond to a formal evaluation of their performance, completed by their field site supervisor.
    6. Complete a self evaluation of the field experience, based upon completion of the outcomes articulated in the learning plan, their own subjective impressions, as well as feedback from peers, supervisor, and the instructor.
    7. Develop a professional resume aimed at summarizing his or her educational and experience qualifications for employment in the fields of social service and/or mental health.
  
  • SSMH 210 Self-Care for Care-Givers (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course helps the professional care provider master personal self-care techniques. The student will learn to identify and plan strategies to cope with the multiple stresses inherent when giving care.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the General Adaptation Syndrome, including general physiological changes which come as a result of stress.
    2. Recall at least one dozen physical ailments which may have stress as a root cause, as measured by participation in class discussion and journal recording.
    3. Explain concepts of eustress and distress, as measured by participation in class discussion and journal recording.
    4. Explain stress management strategies, such as exercise, breathing and relaxation, humor, biofeedback, meditation, yoga, and visualization, as measured by participation in jigsaw activities and class notes.
    5. Explain the concept of codependency, as measured by participation in class discussion and journal recording.
    6. Describe the processes of personal and organizational change, as measured by participation in class discussion and journal recording.
  
  • SSMH 215 Law and Ethics in Social Services (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course explores the legal and ethical issues in social services and includes: counselor regulation, confidentiality, client rights, involuntary commitment, rights and responsibilities of mental health professionals, mandatory reporting, child welfare, case law, and standards of conduct.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and distinguish between “law” and “ethics”.
    2. Explain Kohlberg’s model of moral development.
    3. Discuss extent to which Kohlberg’s model applies to culture other than those with western European roots.
    4. Define RCW’s and WAC’s and discuss the differences between the them.
    5. Define and distinguish between licensing, certification, and registration as established by the RCW’s.
    6. Summarize the requirements for certified advisors, registered counselors in Washington, and Licensed Mental Health Counselors.
    7. Know the contents of the Uniform Disciplinary Act (RCW 18.130) with respect to the behavior of healthcare professionals.
    8. Outline the procedures for disciplining healthcare professionals who are charged with violating requirements of the Uniform Disciplinary Act.
    9. Explain the basic standards relating to disclosures which must be made to clients, extent and limits of confidentiality in the care giving relationship, the mandatory reporting of abuse, both within the context of the relevant state law/regulation, and from the perspective of various groups within the human service community.
    10. Describe ways in which the personal characteristics and experience of the caregiver can enhance or detract from the care giving processing.
    11. Explicate the fundamental principles associated with the concepts of “transference” and “counter-transference”.
    12. Discuss the issue of professional counseling for those preparing for or who practice in human services.
    13. Summarize and reflect upon common concerns of being caregivers.
    14. Identify major stressors they might encounter in the fields of social service and mental health, define “burn out”, and discuss various ways the student might handle these problems in their own practice.
    15. Discuss and synthesize the concepts of client autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, fidelity, and veracity, and discuss their significance for the professional in practice.
    16. Reflect upon potential conflicts that might arise between the student’s personal value systems and those held in common within the field of human services, especially when working with client’s whose values or behavior might be at odds with what the care giver believes is good.
    17. Reflect upon one’s own attitudes about ethnicity, ability/disability (especially those with mental disabilities), gender, and sexual orientation and discuss how these attitudes might influence one’s effectiveness in the field of human services.
    18. Compare and contrast values/beliefs associated between at least two cultural influences, e.g. eastern and western, and discuss the potential significance of such differences when attempting to work with a diverse client base.
    19. Summarize some of the historical lessons based on past failures of those in the mental health field attempting to balance patient rights with the perceived need of society to manage the behavior of mentally ill people.
    20. Summarize and reflect case law decisions related to a variety of mental health treatment issues, such as due process in the involuntary commitment process, patient rights, right to real treatment when confined, standards of care, and the duty to warn.
    21. Reflect upon one’s own motivation for entering into the helping professions and discuss these in relation to how these might enhance or detract from the care giving process.
    22. Explore and reflect upon one’s own values and discuss both how these might enhance one’s work with client’s as well as how they might negatively impact the helping process.
    23. Explore and reflect upon one’s own attitudes about people from diverse populations (e.g. members of racial and/or ethnic groups, those who have physical and/or mental challenges, and members of sexual minority groups) and discuss how one might approach human service work so as to be both ethically responsible and professionally competent when working with a diverse range of clients.
    24. Locate the relevant RCW’s or WAC’s dealing with specific counselor-related issues and discuss the relevance of these codes to professional practice.
    25. Articulate a basic self-care plan, as measured by submission of a short outline, paper, or extensive reflective journal entry.
    26. Articulate a plan for working with clients that both acknowledges one’s personal and cultural biases and address ways in which the student can improve one’s working relationships with clients.
  
  • SSMH 230 Abuse in the Family (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrolled in the SSMH program, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with problems of abuse in the family. Examines types of abuse, definitions, frequency, views of causation, as well as approaches to intervention and prevention.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss popular perceptions about family abuse and the reasons for general societal concern about this issue.
    2. Identify events and summarize elements in the evolution of concern about the issue of family maltreatment within the professional human service community.
    3. Define the various forms of family maltreatment: physical, sexual, psychological/emotional, financial exploitation, and neglect using criteria recognized within the professional human service and social science communities.
    4. Reflect upon and explore one’s own personal and emotional reactions to the topic, and articulate personal self-care strategies for coping with the difficult nature of the material for the duration of the course.
    5. Identify and describe the relative contributions of individual, family, community, cultural, and societal influences on the incidence and prevalence of family maltreatment in our society.
    6. Participate in discussion about the troublesome controversies and issues associated with family abuse phenomena.
    7. Summarize, distinguish between, and compare the various social science approaches to studying family abuse phenomena, e.g. experimental (scientific method), correlational, descriptive, and qualitative approaches to research.
    8. Evaluate specific pieces of social science research, and/or specific models, relating to the topic of family abuse, based upon the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to social science research.
    9. Identify key components of various family maltreatment models, and be able to use this information to discuss and illustrate how these models can be used to help explain and understand the various family abuse phenomena.
    10. Articulate how various forms of family abuse impact individuals, families, communities, and our society.
    11. Distinguish between distinct types of offenders and discuss factors which are believed to be associated with the development of their abusive behavior.
    12. Identify and describe several community resources available to help people who are affected by family abuse issues.
    13. Apply information, concepts, and models introduced in this course to specific case examples of family maltreatment in order to explain its dynamics.
    14. Integrate the information, results of research, concepts, and models introduced in this course in the development of a simple prevention or intervention activity or project.

Sociology

  
  • SOC 211 Family and Intimate Relationships (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A sociological exploration of family, marriage and intimate relationships. The family is explored as a social institution shaped by cultural and historical factors. Topics surveyed include attraction, dating, love, commitment choices, parenting, communication, conflict, and divorce. Students will learn about diverse forms of modern families and research findings on how to enhance family relationships.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the family as a social institution.
    2. Recognize different family types and describe cross-cultural differences in customs and traditions within the U.S. as well as worldwide.
    3. List, describe and be able to apply sociological theories or perspectives (functional, conflict, and interaction) designed to explain the family.
    4. Identify how mate choices can be explained and analyzed through the use of various theories.
    5. Recognize the diversity in customs and traditions related to liking, love, dating, intimacy, courtship, mate-selection, marriage and commitment.
    6. Explore the diversity of marriage ceremonies, rights, and rituals in different cultures.
    7. Describe the research data regarding the function of sexuality in building an intimate relationship.
    8. Identify and describe diverse attitudes, behavior, issues and concerns related to sexual intimacy.
    9. Describe and analyze the role of good communication in a meaningful intimate relationship.
    10. Describe the role of communication in successful and troubled relationships.
    11. Identify the concerns of the separated, divorced, widowed, and remarried.
    12. Identify the stages surrounding loss and reestablishment.
    13. Identify and analyze the opportunities and challenges related to remarriage and establishing blended families.
    14. Describe how gender roles affect intimate relationships.
    15. Think critically about one’s own family and intimate social interactions; e.g., family, peers, work groups, etc.
    16. Analyze research findings about characteristics of successful intimate relationships. Analyze coping strategies when dealing with the inevitable loss of a relationship.
    17. Apply the scientific method as a means of gaining knowledge about family and intimate social interactions.
  
  • SOC 212 Death, Dying and Bereavement (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A sociological exploration of death, dying, and bereavement. Includes, but is not limited to, the study of our “death system;” practices of the funeral service industry; the role of the healthcare system; traumatic death; facing death; care of the dying; bereavement, grief, and mourning; legal & ethical issues; practical matters; and belief in life after life.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and discuss the role of key personalities, theories, and approaches in describing, explaining, and/or predicting human behavior related to death, dying, and bereavement
    2. Explain, give examples, and analyze how social theory and various research methods are used to study death, dying, and bereavement
    3. Identify key elements of our contemporary “death system”
    4. Use social theory to analyze the effect of diverse customs and practices related to death, dying, and bereavement from pre-modern to contemporary times in terms of beliefs, functions, and meaning
    5. Describe the role of the funeral director in our death system, and how this role has evolved
    6. Use social theory to analyze the rationales and effects of approaches to caring for the dead
    7. Articulate several types of traumatic death and differentiate the complications associated with these in relation to expected and accepted forms
    8. Describe one or more issues associated with living with a terminal illness
    9. Apply social theory to hypothetical cases in which individuals are trying to cope with dying
    10. Use social theory to compare the principles of hospice and palliative care with those which apply to more general forms of health care
    11. Differentiate between the concepts of bereavement, grief, and mourning and be able to use these terms appropriately
    12. Discuss differences and similarities between grief, complicated grief, and depression
    13. Identify ways we can help and support those who have experienced a loss
    14. Differentiate distinct definitions of death and discuss the social implications of using one or more of them
    15. List several key ethical issues related to death, dying, and bereavement and discuss key social issues associated with them
    16. Summarize at least some of the social issues that dying people and bereaved loved must deal with in order to prepare for or respond to death
    17. Compare several diverse belief systems in relation to the questions, “Is there life after life?”
    18. Use social theory to explore key issues associated with the claims of some people that they have had supernatural experiences during a near death experience
  
  • SOC 220 Gender Roles in Society (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A sociological exploration of sex and gender in contemporary society, including an examination of the influences of biology and socialization. Also includes an exploration of the influence of sex and gender on self-concept and social opportunities. Explores historical and cross-cultural dimensions. Examines the influence of gender identity and sexual orientation on the lived experience of individuals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and use key concepts, sociological perspectives, and theories to explore sex and gender
    2. Analyze the role and meaning of masculinity and femininity in society
    3. Discuss the influence of gender on how we conceptualize who we are and what our relationships mean
    4. Identify, recognize, and discuss how biology interacts with culture to shape gender identity and sex roles
    5. Analyze key issues related to gender on both micro and macro levels
    6. Use sociological perspectives to explore the nature of sex, gender, and sexuality
    7. Analyze the effects of adopting a dichotomous “gender system” in the US and elsewhere
    8. Explore possible unanticipated consequences of proposed solutions to gender issues
    9. Recognize, characterize, and identify historical, multicultural, global influences on the experience of gender
    10. Recognize and assess the role of gender and sexuality in social institutions
    11. Discuss hormonal and biological reasons for violence and aggression across sex and gender
    12. Analyze the relationship between masculinity and femininity; gender identity; sexual orientation; and the experiences of “questioning” or unhappiness in a variety of social and cultural contexts
    13. Assess the impact of gender and sexuality on family and interpersonal relationships
    14. Analyze the influence of gender on lived experience of individuals
    15. Explore and discuss the relationship between sex, gender, poverty and class
    16. Explore the influence of gender on body image and health
  
  • SOC 235 Race and Ethnicity (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A sociological exploration of race and ethnicity in contemporary society. Course may include, but is not limited to, a survey of theories, problems, nature, and the dynamics of racism - power and inequality; prejudice and discrimination; racial and ethnic identity; stratification; segregation; and patterns of racial/ethnic relations. Topics are examined conceptually and historically, using data from scientific, philosophical, sociopolitical, legal and cultural sources.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will be able to:
    1. Identify and use key concepts, sociological perspectives, and theories to explore race and ethnicity.
    2. Distinguish race, ethnicity, and nationality.
    3. Discuss the social construction of race.
    4. Identify, recognize, and discuss how culture helps shape racial and ethnic identity.
    5. Recognize the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in American society, highlighting the concepts of both privilege and stratification.
    6. Use sociological perspectives to evaluate how race matters both at the micro and macro levels.
    7. Identify and describe examples of institutionalized racism and discrimination.
    8. Identify how developments in social institutions (e.g. economy, criminal justice system, education, etc.) contribute to and challenge contemporary majority-minority relations.
    9. Identify racial formation and racialization as sociological processes.
    10. Identify racism as a structural and institutional practice.
    11. Recognize, characterize, and identify historical, multicultural, and/or global influences on the experience of race and ethnicity.
    12. Explore and discuss the possible unanticipated, implicit, and subtle consequences of proposed solutions to issues of race and ethnic relations.
  
  • SOC& 101 Introduction to Sociology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SOC 110 - CCN

    Course Description
    An introduction to sociology – the study of society and human interaction. Includes the systematic study of social phenomena, developing one’s “sociological imagination,” and exploring human relationships in a rapidly changing world. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Distinguish how sociology describes, explains, and attempts to predict social phenomena from the way other social science disciplines approach social phenomena
    2. Identify key personalities in sociology and the contributions, theories, and/or approaches they are identified with
    3. Discuss how sociologists use theory and research to describe, explain, and sometimes predict social phenomena;
    4. Define the concept ‘social fact’ and apply it to a real life situation
    5. Apply specific sociological perspectives to one or more social phenomenon
    6. Explain how the scientific method can be used to study social phenomena
    7. Define and be able to apply the concept of ‘culture’ to human social behavior
    8. Describe and explain how sociologically and non-sociologically oriented theories attempt to explain socialization
    9. Apply the concept of socialization to sex, gender, race, and ethnicity
    10. Discuss the essential elements of social groups and how individuals both influence and are influenced by them
    11. Discuss the relationship between social class; race and ethnicity; sex and gender; gender identity and sexual orientation; and social stratification
    12. Recognize and discuss the effects of social stratification and inequality, including poverty, both in the US and globally
    13. Use one or more social theories to “explain” social deviance
    14. Identify how developments in discrete social institutions (e.g. the family, economy, politics, religion, and health care) both contribute to and challenge the society in which we live
    15. Use established criteria to distinguish between capitalism and socialism as economic systems
    16. Identify and discuss how social and economic systems influence the way people relate to each other
    17. Identify how and/or use Malthusian, neo-Malthusian, and Demographic Transition Theory to explain population growth
    18. Use the following concepts in a discussion of climate change: agriculture, population growth, industrialization, capitalism, and consumerism
  
  • SOC& 201 Social Problems (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SOC 230 - CCN

    Course Description
    A critical review of socioculturally defined problems facing our world on a micro and macro level.

    Student Outcomes
    Knowledge competency areas
    1. Recognize and explain key sociological terms, concepts, and techniques.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    2. Compare and contrast how social problems can overlap.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    3. Evaluate how social problems may be viewed from a global and personal perspective.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    4. Recognize, characterize and identify multicultural problems on a micro and macro level.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    5. Apply sociological techniques to various specific social problems and analyze how solutions may bring new problems.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    6. Build models of ways people have tried to solve social problems.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    7. Identify, recognize and characterize global social problems.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)
    8. Identify, recognize and characterize the cultural populations affected by specific problems.
    (multiple choice test, written expression, oral presentation, projects, peer evaluation, computer assignments, portfolio)

Veterinary Technology

  
  • VT 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology (2 credits)



    Course Description
    Survey of the veterinary medical profession and the role of the technician within the profession. Outlines job opportunities, ethics, husbandry terms for various species including breed identification, and common infectious diseases of dogs and cats.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and list the major organizations within the veterinary medical profession and explain the support role that each organization serves.
    2. Discuss the role and authority of the Veterinary Practice Act and explain how it affects the veterinarian, the technician and the veterinary assistant.
    3. Describe different career opportunities for veterinary technicians and the personal interests and skills that would favor success in various employment settings.
    4. Define and defend personal beliefs relating to professionalism, ethics and morality within the scope of veterinary medicine.
    5. Research, retrieve and use a variety of library resources.
    6. Integrate proper husbandry terms when communicating with veterinary professionals and clients.
    7. Identify the breed using pictures of common large and small animals.
    8. Describe the use of disinfectants and other disease controlling methods to stop the spread of disease in the veterinary hospital.
    9. Describe the major clinical syndrome associated with common infectious diseases affecting dogs and cats.
    10. Describe different techniques for dealing with personal stress.
  
  • VT 101 Animal Nursing I Lecture (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Discussion of the handling and restraint of small animals in medical nursing. Clinical applications of veterinary nursing care. Discussion of the administration of medication as related to nursing care of the hospitalized animal.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Communicate proper restraint techniques for the examination, medication, and/or treatment of dogs and cats.
    2. Describe basic nursing care techniques as they apply to small animal patients by working as a member of a health care team in a veterinary hospital setting.
    3. Describe basic techniques for administering medications to patients via the oral, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intravenous and topical routes.
  
  • VT 102 Animal Nursing I Laboratory (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    The handling and restraint of small animals in medical nursing. Administration of medication as related to nursing care of the hospitalized animal.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proper restraint techniques for the examination, medication, and/or treatment of dogs and cats.
    2. Demonstrate basic nursing care techniques as they apply to small animal patients by working as a member of a health care team in a veterinary hospital setting.
    3. Demonstrate basic techniques for administering medications to patients via the oral, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intravenous and topical routes.
  
  • VT 104 Animal Nursing II (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the preparation of the surgical patient, assisting the doctor in sterile surgery, pre and post-operative care of the patient, performing basic dental prophylaxis.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply chemical disinfectants to control microbes in the veterinary hospital.
    2. Perform routine cleaning, disinfection, and maintenance of surgical equipment and facilities.
    3. Prepare commonly used surgical packs.
    4. Use the autoclave to sterilize surgical packs.
    5. Identify commonly used surgical instruments and describe their use during routine surgical procedures.
    6. Prepare the animal patient for surgery by providing preoperative care and disinfection of the surgical site.
    7. Perform a surgical scrub on self and don the sterile garments necessary to function as a sterile assistant during surgery.
    8. Assist the veterinarian during surgery functioning as a sterile or non-sterile surgical nurse.
    9. Provide postoperative care to surgical patients and monitor them for possible complications.
    10. Describe routine surgical procedures performed on small domestic animals.
    11. Describe normal tooth development and recognize dental abnormalities.
    12. Perform basic dental cleaning on small animals.
    13. Use and maintain dental equipment.
  
  • VT 105 Animal Nursing III (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Basic care and treatment of exotic pet species with an overview of common medical problems and their management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain appropriate husbandry practices for birds, rodents, rabbits, ferrets, reptiles,amphibians and fish kept as domestic pets.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate husbandry practices for mice and rats.
    3. Identify the normal anatomy of common exotic animal species.
    4. Describe the unique anatomic and physiologic features of exotic animal species.
    5. Describe blood collection methods, parenteral injection techniques, and restraint techniques utilized in exotic animal species.
    6. Demonstrate proper restraint of mice, rats, and rabbits.
    7. Collect blood samples and perform parenteral injections in mice, rabbits, and rats.
    8. Describe the common diseases affecting exotic animals and the diagnostic and treatment options available to the veterinarian.
  
  • VT 107 Medical Dosage for Veterinary Technicians (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    A course designed to help the Veterinary Technology student determine accurate veterinary medicine dosage calculations and conversions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform mathematical functions involving fractions, decimals, and whole numbers.
    2. Solve mathematical equations by interpreting story problems.
    3. Prepare accurate dosages to fill a doctor’s prescription.
    4. Use basic algebraic equations to perform conversions from various measurement systems.
    5. Communicate solutions to problems in writing for clarity.
    6. Demonstrate personal responsibility by preparing for and taking exams on the student’s own time schedule.
  
  • VT 110 Ward Care Laboratory I (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Practical experience in daily animal care for professional, stable and ward facilities. This includes maintaining hospital patient records, cleaning and sanitizing holding facilities, supplying proper nutrition, handling post-surgical patients and treatments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Feed and water dogs, cats, horses, and ruminants.
    2. Clean and disinfect small animal housing areas, clean large animal barn.
    3. Use chemical disinfectants safely and effectively.
    4. Perform routine grooming of common domestic animal species.
    5. Read and understand information on the animal’s health record.
    6. Record information on the animal’s health record.
    7. Perform routine treatment procedures on animal patients.
    8. Follow written medical instructions to institute treatment and diagnostic plans.
  
  • VT 111 Ward Care Laboratory II (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Practical experience in daily animal care for professional stable and ward facilities. Procedures include cleaning and sanitizing of holding facilities, supplying proper nutrition, maintaining patient medical records, and administering treatments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Feed and water dogs, cats, horses, and ruminants.
    2. Clean and disinfect small animal housing areas, clean large animal barn.
    3. Use chemical disinfectants safely and effectively.
    4. Perform routine grooming of common domestic animal species.
    5. Read and understand information on the animal’s health record.
    6. Record information on the animal’s health record.
    7. Perform routine treatment procedures on animal patients.
    8. Follow written medical instructions to institute treatment and diagnostic plans.
  
  • VT 112 Ward Care Laboratory III (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Practical experience in daily animal care for professional, stable and ward facilities. This includes maintaining hospital patient records, cleaning and sanitizing holding facilities, supplying proper nutrition, handling post-surgical patients and treatments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Feed and water dogs, cats, horses, and ruminants.
    2. Clean and disinfect small animal housing areas, clean large animal barn.
    3. Use chemical disinfectants safely and effectively.
    4. Perform routine grooming of common domestic animal species.
    5. Read and understand information on the animal’s health record.
    6. Record information on the animal’s health record.
    7. Perform routine treatment procedures on animal patients.
    8. Follow written medical instructions to institute treatment and diagnostic plans.
  
  • VT 123 Large Animal Nursing (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Large animal husbandry techniques and procedures for basic restraint, assessment, and treatment of horses and food animals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the role of the veterinary technician in large animal practice.
    2. Explain the need for the use of a variety of husbandry practices among various large animal species.
    3. Discuss techniques used with specific species using proper terminology.
    4. Explain and/or demonstrate the need and proper use of a variety of equipment and techniques to restrain, medicate, and collect laboratory samples from various large animal species.
    5. Demonstrate large animal nursing skill by completing a given check list of laboratory skills.
  
  • VT 125 Animal Anatomy and Physiology I (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Study of animal body structure and function beginning with cellular components and including all major body systems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify animal body structures and explain their functions on a cellar, tissue, organ, and system levels for the following body systems: skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous, sensory, respiratory, digestive.
    2. Explain the contribution each body structure makes toward the integrated organism.
    3. Assess and explain physiological responses to changes in environmental conditions.
    4. Demonstrate competency in basic laboratory techniques of dissection and use of specific lab equipment used in physiologic functions.
    5. Differentiate between normal and abnormal basic anatomic and physiologic data.
    6. Evaluate, analyze, and summarize the practical applications of anatomy and physiology by use of clinical scenarios, live animals, radiographs, and lab specimens.
    7. Demonstrate personal responsibility by attending class, turning in assignments on time, and participating in class activities.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to work in diverse teams to communicate technical information in an informal way to team members, and to resolve conflicts cooperatively.
  
  • VT 126 Animal Anatomy and Physiology II (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    A continuation of VT 125 to study animal body structure and function by including additional major body systems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify animal body structures and explain their functions on a cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels for the following body systems: Urinary, reproductive, and endocrine.
    2. Explain the contribution each body structure makes toward the integrated organism.
    3. Assess and explain physiological responses to changes in environmental conditions.
    4. Demonstrate competency in basic laboratory techniques of dissection and use of specific lab equipment used in physiologic functions.
    5. Differentiate between normal and abnormal basic anatomic and physiologic data.
    6. Evaluate, analyze, and summarize the practical applications of anatomy and physiology by use of clinical scenarios, live animals, radiographs, and lab specimens.
    7. Demonstrate personal responsibility by attending class, turning in assignments on time, and participating in class activities.
    8. Demonstrate the ability to work in diverse teams to communicate technical information in an informal way to team members and to resolve conflicts cooperatively.
  
  • VT 150 Clinical Microbiology and Public Health (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Veterinary Technology course that introduces the student to microorganisms of clinical importance in veterinary medicine. Emphasis will be placed on zoonoses and public health as it applies to veterinary medicine and the veterinary technician.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Distinguish the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa.
    2. Classify bacteria according to their shape and morphology.
    3. Compare and contrast gram negative and gram positive cell walls.
    4. Identify microbe cellular structures and contents.
    5. Classify organisms according to their temperature and oxygen requirements.
    6. Analyze different methods of controlling microbial growth.
    7. Correlate the major bacterial groups with representative diseases that they cause.
    8. Explain basic epidemiological concepts in the control and prevention of infectious diseases.
    9. Describe the most common zoonotic diseases in North America.
    10. Explain the prevention and control strategies for each zoonotic disease.
    11. Define basic viral structures and life cycles.
    12. Describe the different kinds of viruses and the diseases that they cause.
    13. Define host defenses, both general and specific.
    14. Contrast cell mediated immunity and antibody mediated immunity.
    15. Explain the actions of antibiotics and synthetic antimicrobials.
    16. Gain proficiency in the use of the light microscope, including immersion oil lens.
    17. Perform simple and complex bacterial stains.
    18. Isolate pure bacterial colonies from a mixed culture.
    19. Perform biochemical tests on microorganisms.
    20. Identify an unknown bacterial species by using a battery of biochemical tests.
  
  • VT 155 Nutrition and Complementary Therapies (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Overview of small animal nutrition with emphasis placed on therapeutic diets, age related dietary needs, and sound nutritional recommendations. Survey of common complementary therapies used in veterinary medicine with emphasis placed on different cultures and traditions, discerning fact from fiction, and the veterinary technician’s role in complementary therapy practice.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Discuss the six major components of an animal diet by listing the sources for the
    components and identifying the effects that each component has on the body.
    2. Compare and contrast the components of a quality animal diet and a poor animal diet.
    3. Determine appropriate therapeutic diet for common disease conditions.
    4. Communicate the proper nutritional requirements for various stages of life.
    5. Compare and contrast commercial diets and homemade diets.
    6. Discern different medicinal traditions and cultures.
    7. Compare and contrast Western medicine, allopathic medicine, and holistic medicine.
    8. Discuss the difference between alternative therapies and complementary therapies.
    9. Discuss the common complementary modalities practiced in veterinary medicine.
    10. Identify the appropriate role of the veterinary technician while practicing complementary
    therapies.
  
  • VT 160 Applied Behavior Techniques I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Introductory course in a series of three courses on canine and feline behavior. The student will work to socialize and train program dogs and cats while learning about common behavioral problems/solutions seen in the veterinary field.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss normal canine behavior to include pack hierarchy and domestication.
    2. Compare and contrast canines vs. felines as pets.
    3. Observe canine and feline body language and communication.
    4. Discuss common canine and feline behavior problems.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to work successfully with a variety of dogs and cats with varied temperaments.
    6. Explore a variety of training and conditioning techniques.
    7. Create client education information on common dog and cat husbandry and behavior topics.
 

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