2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Dec 09, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Dental Hygiene

  
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    DHYG 277 Restorative Dentistry and Dental Materials I (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Develops foundational knowledge in restorative including properties of dental materials, chairside assisting and fabrication of select therapeutic oral devices.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level:
    a. dental chair-side skills as it applies to four-handed dentistry.
    b. in maintaining a clear operating field for intraoral treatment using high speed evacuation and retraction.
    c. the procedure for taking accurate maxillary and mandibular alginate impressions.
    d. the pouring of an intraoral impression in plaster or stone.
    e. a working knowledge of a model trimmer and its attachments.
    f. the use of a vacuum former for the purpose of fabricating a bleach, fluoride and/or other intraoral therapeutic trays.
    g. the placement of a dental dam, clamp selection and various techniques associated with each.

    2. Compare and contrast the different types of prosthetic impression materials used in dentistry.
    3. Accurately identify and discuss the properties of alginate impression materials.
    4. Accurately identify and discuss the properties and types of gypsum products.
    5. Accurately identify and describe the use of dental instruments used in restorative procedures when placing amalgam and/or composite restorations.
    6. Accurately identify and demonstrate a working knowledge of burs used in dentistry for restorative procedures.
    7. Accurately identify, define and apply dental nomenclature at all times.
    8. Describe and identify ideal Class I to Class VI cavity preparations for amalgams and composite restorations.
    9. Discuss the indications and contraindications of bleaching teeth and describe the various teeth bleaching materials, methods and techniques, including ethical considerations.
    10. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
  
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    DHYG 282 Dental Imaging II (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    A course in radiology further developing dental imaging techniques. Includes extra-oral and intra-oral radiography, photography, and video imaging using radiographic evaluation and interpretation to assist in treatment planning, techniques for special populations, oral cancer screening techniques, dental imaging film exposing and mounting techniques, and theoretical developing and processing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using the American Dental Association (ADA) guidelines for dental radiographic examinations, accurately and consistently determine and recommend a patient’s dental radiographic examination needs for intra-oral and extra-oral imaging.
    2. Demonstrate correct extra-oral and advanced intra-oral digital dental imaging techniques using aseptic protocol.
    3. Identify digital intra-oral and extra-oral technique errors and demonstrate correction and prevention of these errors.
    4. Accurately describe and identify normal anatomical landmarks on intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs.
    5. Demonstrate accurate evaluation and interpretation of intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs.
    6. Accurately describe and identify normal anatomical landmarks on intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs.
    7. Accurately describe and identify radiographic structures which deviate from normal structures on intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs including restorations, dental materials, and foreign objects.
    8. Accurately describe and identify indications of pathology on intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs including dental caries, evidence of periodontal disease process, trauma, resorption (external and internal), periapical lesions, impacted teeth, eruption patterns, growth and development, and bone and soft tissue diseases, etc.
    9. Describe alternative intra-oral exposure techniques and digital receptor holders.
    10. Describe the principles of extra-oral and intra-oral photographs.
    11. Accurately describe and identify indications for the use of dental photography, intra-oral video imaging and oral cancer screening/imaging in dental and dental hygiene patient care.
    12. Accurately and consistently demonstrate correct technique to create diagnostic extra-oral and intra-oral digital photographs using aseptic protocol.
    13. Identify the available systems and equipment utilized for intra-oral video imaging and oral cancer screening/imaging.
    14. Describe the intended use for administration/exposure, evaluation, and interpretation of intra-oral video images and oral cancer screening results.
    15. Consistently demonstrate the correct use of intra-oral video imaging systems and oral cancer screening/imaging equipment using aseptic protocol.
    16. Accurately and consistently demonstrate and describe technique modifications for intra-oral and extra-oral radiographs on special populations.
    17. Describe exposure, processing, mounting, and evaluating diagnostic film intra-oral surveys.
    18. Identify and describe film processing and mounting errors and prevention of film processing and mounting errors.
    19. Correctly demonstrate patient education and motivational communication regarding the use and significance of dental radiographs, photographs, and video imaging.
  
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    DHYG 283 Oral Disease Prevention and Cariology II (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This course continues to develop the principals of oral disease prevention, and includes an introduction of current skills/techniques for caries prevention. An integrated component is scientific inquiry of quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define, spell, and utilize all preventive terminology presented in this course.
    2. Explain the process of Early Childhood Caries and the onset of the initial lesion
    3. Review chemical reactions, metabolism, toxicity, health benefits, and treatment modalities regarding pre-eruptive and post-eruptive fluoride modalities.
    5. Correctly discuss the purposes, indications, and application of pit and fissure sealants.
    6. Demonstrate clinical proficiency in the application of post-eruptive topical fluoride compounds to tooth surfaces.
    7. Demonstrate clinical proficiency in the application of pit and fissure sealants to extracted and natural tooth surfaces.
    8. Demonstrate a developing knowledge of scientific research by accessing online and library resources.
  
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    DHYG 284 Biological Structures II: Head and Neck Anatomy (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This is the second in a series of three courses. This course provides a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of the anatomy of the human head and neck region including oral structures, osteology, lymphatic system, salivary glands, muscles, arterial, venous, and nervous systems.

    Student Outcomes
    These outcomes are specific and relevant to the theory and practice of dental hygiene. The student should be able to integrate essential anatomical facts and concepts of function into clinical observation and assessment of these structures. Other courses building on this foundation include: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene, Oral Pathology, Periodontology, and Restorative Dentistry.

    In all class and lab settings, accurately and consistently:
    1. Demonstrate correct and accurate usage of terminology associated with course content
    2. Identify and describe the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity
    3. Demonstrate an accurate and detailed understanding of the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity
    4. Demonstrate an accurate and detailed understanding of the functions and relationships of the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity
    5. Describe and discuss the anatomical basis for the spread of infections in the head and neck
    6. Demonstrate accurate and detailed knowledge of the regions of the head, neck and oral cavity examined by the dental hygienist during client assessment
  
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    DHYG 286 Pharmacology I (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An introductory course in general pharmacology. Includes therapeutic actions, adverse reactions, and pharmacological interactions of drugs used and encountered in the practice of dental hygiene and dentistry.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe drug laws and their impact on drug regulation.
    2. Describe drug effects, types of pharmaceutical preparations, and routes of drug administration.
    3. Describe correct methods of prescription writing in relationship to accuracy, safety, generic substitution, and prevention of misuse.
    4. Describe and differentiate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.
    5. Describe and recognize the manifestations of drug reactions.
  
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    DHYG 287 Restorative Dentistry and Dental Materials II (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Develops foundational knowledge and skills in restorative dentistry for the expanded functions dental hygienist. Introduces the placement and finishing of dental amalgam restorations and composite restorations on the adult dentition.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level:
    a. correct placement of various dental matricies and wedging systems associated with both composite and amalgam restorations,
    b. the correct placement of liner and base materials currently used in best practices,
    c. the correct placement, finishing, and polishing of Class I, II, III and V composite restorations as per current evidence-based best practices,
    d. the correct placement and carving of Class I, II and V amalgam restorations as per current evidence-based best practices,
    e. the correct principle and techniques for amalgam polish.

    2. Accurately describe and compare the properties and manipulation of composite materials from early composites to the most current composites.
    3. Accurately discuss the various properties and principles associated with manipulation of amalgam materials from early amalgams to the most currently used amalgams.
    4. On a typodont, consistently apply principles of proper occlusal and proximal dental anatomy and the relationship occlusion has on the evaluation of restorations.
    5. Correctly explain the potential hazards of dental mercury and the controversies associated with dental contamination.
    6. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
  
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    DHYG 300 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The second in a series of eight linked courses to introduce and develop foundational knowledge and comprehension of dental hygiene theory and facilitate the growth of introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene in all clinical settings. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using (American Psychological Association) APA guidelines. Initial enrollment in this course must be for maximum credits.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a classroom setting using current evidence-based dental hygiene theory and science, accurately and consistently:
    a. recognize and describe the principles of proper body mechanics related to patient and operator positioning.
    b. describe the basic principles of dental instrumentation to include grasp, fulcrum, instrument design and identification, adaptation, initiation of motion, proper use, care and storage.
    c. describe the use of the dental air and water tip, high and low velocity suction, mirror, probe, explorer, sickle scalers and universal curettes.
    d. using correct terminology and evidence-based research, explain the rational and purpose for each of the following dental hygiene skills: comprehensive health history ( including a social, medical, medication and dental history), extra-oral examination, intra-oral examination, periodontal risk assessment and tooth charting. Include any alterations to care.
    e. interpret a comprehensive health history, including a social, medical, medication, and dental history, and identify any alterations to care based on the interpretation.
    f. identify when additional information is needed to a complete a comprehensive interpretation of the patient’s health and treatment and seek assistance from your professor(s) to ensure quality patient care.
    g. describe the parameters and techniques for patient vital signs, identify normal and abnormal values for these signs, and demonstrate the correct techniques for pulse rate, respiration rate and blood pressure readings.
    h. explain and recognize the difference between “normal” and “abnormal” extra-oral and intra-oral findings for a patient examination and periodontal assessment, discuss the relevance of these findings to patient health and care.
    i. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently locate and identify all physical structures associated with general patient survey, taking vital signs, extra-oral, intra-oral, and periodontal assessment examination, explain the relevance of these structures to patient assessment and care.
    j. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently describe and identify variations in occlusion classification to include Angle’s classification of occlusion.
    k. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    l. demonstrate thorough and legal chart entries for clinical practice using accurate format, sequence, order, terminology, spelling and findings.
    m. using any oral healthcare equipment or instrument, demonstrate evidence-based theory and science of infection and exposure control for location/setting.
    n. describe proper care and maintenance of the dental unit and related equipment.
    o. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently analyze and interpret the sequence of human development related to occlusion in both the pedodontic and adult dentition, including variations for tooth eruption, potential problems with the eruption of the permanent dentition, and eruption factors.
    p. identify, organize and format relevant clinical reference materials for chairside use that support patient assessment procedures and application of departmental policies and procedures. As applicable, add to your ePortfolio.

    2. Consistently and accurately demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    3. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)

    4. Register and initiate current required ePortfolio as directed by dental hygiene department.
  
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    DHYG 301 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Practice I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The first in a series of seven linked courses to develop introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. This course applies knowledge in dental hygiene theory and science from DHYG 310. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a pre-clinic setting using current evidence-based dental hygiene theory and science, accurately and consistently:
    a. recognize, describe and demonstrate the principles of proper body mechanics related to patient and operator positioning.
    b. describe and demonstrate the basic principles of dental instrumentation to include grasp, fulcrum, instrument design and identification, adaptation, initiation of motion, proper use, care and storage.
    c. describe and demonstrate the use of the dental air and water tip, high and low velocity suction, mirror, probe, explorer, sickle scalers and universal curettes.
    d. using correct terminology and evidence-based research, explain the rational and purpose for each of the following dental hygiene skills: comprehensive health history ( including a social, medical, medication and dental history), extra-oral examination, intra-oral examination, periodontal risk assessment and tooth charting. Include any alterations to care.
    e. interpret a comprehensive health history, including a social, medical, medication, and dental history, and identify any alterations to care based on the interpretation.
    f. identify when additional information is needed to a complete a comprehensive interpretation of the patient’s health and treatment and seek assistance from your professor(s) to ensure quality patient care.
    g. describe the parameters and techniques for patient vital signs, identify normal and abnormal values for these signs, and demonstrate the correct techniques for pulse rate, respiration rate and blood pressure readings.
    h. explain and recognize the difference between “normal” and “abnormal” extra-oral and intra-oral findings for a patient examination and periodontal assessment, discuss the relevance of these findings to patient health and care.
    i. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently locate and identify all physical structures associated with general patient survey, taking vital signs, extra-oral, intra-oral, and periodontal assessment examination, explain the relevance of these structures to patient assessment and care.
    j. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently describe and identify variations in occlusion classification to include Angle’s classification of occlusion.
    k. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    l. demonstrate thorough and legal chart entries for clinical practice using accurate format, sequence, order, terminology, spelling and findings.
    m. using any oral healthcare equipment or instrument, demonstrate evidence-based theory and science of infection and exposure control for location/setting.
    n. demonstrate and apply proper care and maintenance of the dental unit and related equipment.
    o. using diagrams, models or patients, consistently analyze and interpret the sequence of human development related to occlusion in both the pedodontic and adult dentition, including variations for tooth eruption, potential problems with the eruption of the permanent dentition, and eruption factors.
    p. identify, organize and format relevant clinical reference materials for chairside use that support patient assessment procedures and application of departmental policies and procedures. As applicable, add to your ePortfolio.

    2. Consistently and accurately demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors
    3. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 306 Pharmacology II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    A course further developing knowledge in general pharmacology, therapeutic actions, adverse reactions, and drug interactions of drugs used and encountered in dental and dental hygiene practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe, recognize, and analyze common drug interactions in dentistry.
    2. Describe, recognize, and analyze the systemic and oral manifestations of drug reactions.
    3. Describe and recognize the basic principles of substance abuse.
    4. Describe, recognize, and analyze the indications, contraindications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and clinical considerations of common drugs used in dentistry.
    5. Describe, recognize, and analyze the indications, contraindications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and clinical considerations of drugs commonly used by dental patients.
    6. Accurately and consistently utilize appropriate drug information reference sources, evaluate patients’ medical health histories to determine medication use, drug adverse reactions, and alterations to dental or dental hygiene care.
  
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    DHYG 310 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory & Science II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The third in a series of eight linked courses to further develop foundational knowledge and comprehension of dental hygiene theory and science in order to facilitate the growth of introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Continued development of theory and science from DHYG 300 for the clinical application in DHYG 311.
    2. Develop dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    3. Interpret patient interview and clinic assessment data to apply principles in cariology and periodontology in identifying caries risk and periodontal risk for individual patients in order to develop a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    4. Apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    5. Determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral disease classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) as gingivitis.
    6. Determine appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    7. Describe the basic principles of instrumentation of the Nabor’s probe and area specific curets for the purpose of scaling and root planning.
    8. Describe the principles of treatment planning for implementation of introductory root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    9. Demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    10. Describe the principles of accurate techniques of instrument sharpening and maintenance for files and other area-specific dental instruments.
    11. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.
    12. Register and initiate current required ePortfolio as directed by dental hygiene department.
  
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    DHYG 311 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Practice II (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The second in a series of seven linked courses to continue development of introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Continued development of all skills and knowledge from DHYG 301.

    2. In a pre-clinic or clinic setting using patients and current evidence-based dental hygiene theory and science, accurately and consistently:
    a. apply dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    b. interpret patient interview and clinic assessment data, applying principles of cariology to identify caries risk and applying the periodontal risk assessment for individual patients in order to develop of a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    b. apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    c. determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral disease classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) as gingivitis.
    d. determine appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    e. describe and demonstrate the basic principles of instrumentation of the Nabor’s probe and area specific curets for the purpose of scaling and root planning.
    f. identify and treatment plan for implementation of introductory root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    g. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    h. identify, organize and format relevant clinical reference materials for chairside use that support patient assessment procedures and application of departmental policies and procedures. As applicable, add to your ePortfolio.

    3. Describe the principles and consistently demonstrate accurate techniques of instrument sharpening and maintenance for files and other area-specific dental instruments.

    4. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    5. In a pre-clinic and/or clinic setting with progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from DHYG 301.

    6. In all settings, consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 314 Biological Structures III: Embryology and Histology (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This is the third in a series of three courses. Content continues a comprehensive study of structures and functions of the human head and neck region and oral structures. These fundamentals are the building blocks for understanding the elements of healthy oral tissues and related pathology. An understanding of embryology is a key to understanding the etiology of many common congenital defects affecting the head, neck, face, oral structures, and/or the teeth.

    Student Outcomes
    These outcomes are specific and relevant to the theory and practice of dental hygiene. The student should be able to integrate essential developmental facts and concepts of orofacial structures into clinical observation and assessment of these structures. Other courses building on this foundation include: Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene, Oral Pathology, Periodontology, and Restorative Dentistry.

    In all class and lab settings, accurately and consistently:
    1. Demonstrate correct and accurate usage of terminology associated with course content
    2. Identify the cells and basic tissue components of structures of the head and neck and dentitions
    3. Demonstrate accurate and detailed understanding of the basic tissue components of the head, neck, face and oral cavity, and the dentitions
    4. Demonstrate an accurate and detailed understanding of the:
    a. embryonic development of the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity, and the dentitions
    b. histology of the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity, and the dentitions
    c. anatomical and physiological basis for form and function of the hard and soft tissues and systems of the head, neck, face and oral cavity
    d. morphology of the crowns and roots of primary and permanent human teeth
    e. embryological and histological timeline of the development of head and neck structures
  
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    DHYG 315 Oral Pathology (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An introduction to the pathologic processes (including genetics), the recognition of oral diseases and oral manifestations of commonly encountered systemic diseases, and their considerations to the practice of dental hygiene.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and describe oral pathology terms.
    2. Describe the diagnostic categories that contribute to the diagnostic process.
    3. Consistently and accurately utilize the diagnostic categories that contribute to the preliminary diagnosis of oral diseases.
    4. Describe factors involved in the pathogenesis of oral diseases.
    5. Describe and identify the local and systemic signs of inflammation.
    6. Describe the microscopic events of the inflammatory process and the regeneration/repair process.
    7. Describe and recognize the physical and chemical injuries of the hard and soft oral tissues.
    8. Explain the immune responses and autoimmunity associated with oral diseases.
    9. Describe and recognize oral conditions that are variants of normal or benign conditions of unknown cause.
    10.Describe and recognize developmental anomalies of the face, oral cavity, and teeth.
    11.Describe and recognize the etiology, population, clinical features, radiographic features, microscopic features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and clinical considerations of commonly encountered oral diseases.
    12.Describe and recognize the etiology, population, clinical features, radiographic features, microscopic features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and clinical considerations of oral manifestations of commonly encountered systemic diseases.
  
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    DHYG 316 Pharmacology (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The general pharmacology and therapeutic action of drugs used and encountered in dental and dental hygiene practice.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe drug laws and their impact on drug regulation.
    2. Describe drug effects, types of pharmaceutical preparations, and routes of drug administration.
    3. Describe prescription writing in relationship to accuracy, safety, generic substitution, and prevention of misuse.
    4. Describe and differentiate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.
    5. Describe and recognize common drug interactions in dentistry.
    6. Describe and recognize the oral manifestations of drug reactions.
    7. Describe the basic principles of drug abuse.
    8. Describe and recognize the indications, contraindications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and clinical considerations of common drugs used in dentistry.
    9. Describe and recognize the indications, contraindications, adverse reactions, drug interactions, and clinical considerations of drugs commonly used by dental patients.
    10.Accurately and consistently utilize appropriate drug information reference sources, evaluate patients’ medical health histories to determine medication use, drug adverse reactions, and alterations to dental or dental hygiene care.
  
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    DHYG 317 Restorative Dentistry I (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Facilitates the growth of developing skills from DHYG 277 and DHYG 287 in the placement, carving and polishing of dental amalgam restorations on the adult dentition, and the placement, finishing and polishing of composite restorations on the adult dentition in a lab setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate increasingly competent skills to a clinically acceptable level:
    a. the correct placement, finishing, and polishing of Class I, II, III and V composite restorations as per current evidence-based best practices.
    b. the correct placement and carving of Class I, II and V amalgam restorations as per current evidence-based best practices.

    2. In all settings, demonstrate professional, compassionate and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
    3. Identify and differentiate between primary and adult amalgam and composite restorations.
    4. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
  
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    DHYG 318 Community Oral Health Educational Practicum (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    A course incorporating dental public health agenda and the development and implementation of community-based educational outreach services.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the principles of community health including the role of prevention, education, promotion, and organized community efforts in public health agenda.
    2. Evaluate and describe the objectives of health education in preventive oral health programs.
    3. Examine the relationship between concepts, goals, and behavioral objectives in health education curriculum development and instruction.
    4. Designate the principle challenges in conducting effective and appropriate community-based educational services.
    5. Identify correct learning theories and explain how to apply these to various motivational techniques.
    6. Differentiate the four principles in utilizing appropriate teaching strategies for health instruction and list the criteria for teaching methods selection
    7. Explain the purpose of the evaluation as it relates to health curriculum and instruction, and differentiate between objective and subjective techniques of evaluation.
    8. Develop community oral health educational curriculum for a specified population cohort and present educational services.
    9. Function as an effective community oral health educator for groups of people by utilizing appropriate criteria and techniques for dental hygiene educational agenda.
    10. Describe and apply the criteria for selection of appropriate target populations for community oral health projects.
    11. Acquire practical experience in the provision of community oral health services through involvement in community service educational learning projects.
  
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    DHYG 320 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Theory III (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The fourth in a series of eight linked courses to further develop foundational knowledge and comprehension of dental hygiene theory and science in order to facilitate the growth of introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using current evidence-based sciencewith oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, accurately and consistently:
    a. record and organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    b. discuss dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    c. interpret patient interview and clinical assessment data, applying principles of cariology to identify caries risk for individual patients in order to develop of a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    d. discuss treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    e. determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral disease classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) as gingivitis.
    f. determine appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    g. describe the basic principles of instrumentation of the Nabor’s probe and area specific curets for the purpose of scaling and root planning.
    h. describe accurate techniques of instrument sharpening and maintenance for files and other area-specific dental instruments.
    i. discuss case documentation and presentation using PowerPoint software, including integration of digital images.
    2. Demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    3. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.
    4. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 321 Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Practice III (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The third in a series of seven linked courses to continue development of introductory dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. This course applies knowledge in dental hygiene theory and science from DHYG 310. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using current evidence-based science in a clinic setting on patients with oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, accurately and consistently:
    a. record and organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    b. apply dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    c. interpret patient interview and clinical assessment data, applying principles of cariology to identify caries risk for individual patients in order to develop of a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    d. apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    e. determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral disease classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) as gingivitis.
    f. determine appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    g. describe and demonstrate the basic principles of instrumentation of the Nabor’s probe and area specific curets for the purpose of scaling and root planning.
    h. demonstrate accurate techniques of instrument sharpening and maintenance for files and other area-specific dental instruments.
    i. demonstrate case documentation and presentation using PowerPoint software, including integration of digital images. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    j. demonstrate thorough and legal chart entries for clinical practice using accurate format, sequence, order, terminology, spelling and findings.

    2. In all settings, demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    3. In all settings, consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)

    4.In a clinic setting with progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from DHYG 301 and 311.
  
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    DHYG 325 Introduction to Periodontology I (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    First in a series of three courses, DHYG 325, 405, and 415, introducing the dental hygienist to the basic science and introductory components for assessing and evaluating the periodontal health of individuals. Content includes an introduction to non-surgical periodontal therapy and periodontal instrumentation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the historical background of periodontology from early civilizations until post World War II.
    2. Identify, discuss, and explain the function of the normal/healthy periodontal structures of the periodontium using correct terminology: marginal gingival; gingival sulcus; attached gingival; interdental gingival; alveolar gingival; mucogingival junction; gingival epithelium; gingival connective tissue; periodontal ligament (fibers, ground substance); cementum (types, permeability, cemento-enamel junction, resorption, repair); alveolar process (socket wall, bone marrow, periosteum, endosteum, and etc.
    3. Identify and describe the histological features and embryological development of the periodontal structures, using correct terminology, in health and in a diseased state
    4. Describe, define, and list the current American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) classifications of periodontal diseases, and their epidemiology.
    5. Identify and apply the AAP classifications to analyze and diagnose case studies, and eventually, clinical patient treatment.
    6. Describe and discuss the inflammatory process and immune system. This includes identifying and describing the vascular response to injury, the chemical mediators in vascular response, the blood leukocytes and their respective roles or functions.
    7. Describe and synthesize content for the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Include applicable microbiology, host/microbe interaction, wound healing, process, development, and consequences.
    8. Discuss and describe the effects of aging on the periodontium.
  
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    DHYG 326 Pain Management I: Local Anesthesia (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This course provides the fundamentals of dental local anesthesia delivery. Students will be introduced to the physiology and pharmacology of dental local anesthesia, elements of pre-anesthesia patient assessment, and devices and injection techniques commonly used in dentistry. Students will practice common injection techniques and experience the effects of a variety of local drugs in lab situations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the evolution of the use of local anesthetics and benchmark products.
    2. Identify and discuss relevant anatomy pertinent to dental local anesthesia injections including bony and soft tissue landmarks, muscles, vasculature, and pathways of the Facial and Trigeminal nerves.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the pharmacology and mechanism of action of local anesthetic agents and commonly used vasoconstrictors.
    4. Given a health history and treatment plan, accurately evaluate the patient for suitability for local anesthesia.
    5. Demonstrate correct selection of local anesthetic agents and accurate calculation of drug doses for given drugs and patient histories.
    6. Discuss and demonstrate knowledge of all components of the local anesthetic armamentarium and devices.
    7. Discuss and demonstrate effective patient-operator positioning, safe handling, use, and maintenance of the dental local anesthetic devices.
    8. Describe and demonstrate principles for administering safe and effective dental local anesthesia to patients including proper soft tissue retraction, effective fulcrums, hand positioning, and aspiration with during delivery of local anesthetic drugs.
    8. Demonstrate clinically acceptable techniques for each injection introduced in lab.
    9. Describe and identify common local anesthetic complications and their prevention and treatment.
    10.Identify proper symptomatic treatment of medical emergencies related to local anesthesia procedure.
  
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    DHYG 327 Restorative Dentistry II (1.5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Development of advanced techniques in the placement, carving and polishing of dental amalgam restorations on the adult dentition and introductory techniques for the primary dentition, the placement, finishing and polishing of composite restorations on the adult dentition, and dental restorative theories related to advanced techniques and procedures of dentistry.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the various materials used in the fabrication of provisional (temporary) restorations for the protection of crown preparations, including stainless steel crowns (SSC) for pediatric dentistry.
    2. Identify the features of a clinically acceptable and functional provisional restoration.
    3. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level for:
    a. The construction of provisional restorations and SSCs for pediatric dentistry.
    b. The placement of dental dams using alternative and advanced techniques.
    c. The placement of retraction cord in preparation for Class V restorations, and in the preparation for crown and bridge impressions.
    d. The placement and carving of amalgam restorations and the placement, finishing and polishing of composite restorations on the adult dentition.
    e. The placement, carving and finishing of amalgam and compomer restorations for the primary dentition.
    4. Demonstrate the various methods used for accurate vitality testing results.
    5. Accurately describe and demonstrate the various methods and materials used for gingival retraction.
    6. Discuss the uses of, risks and indication for hemostatic agents.
    7. Describe the appropriate interview questions and procedures regarding the investigation of a patient’s dental pain complaint.
    8. Describe, using correct terminology, the principles of endodontic diagnosis.
    9. Complete the “Expanded Functions Dental Auxiliary- Final Impressions” Continuing Education Course
    10. In all settings, demonstrate professional, compassionate communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster good oral health and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 328 Education Methodologies: Patient Centered Care (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Emphasis on effective communication with patients as well as co-workers. Students will be given the opportunity to develop their own style of presenting patient education while learning motivation techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate and describe the objectives of health education in preventive, individualized oral health programs.
    2. Designate the principle challenges in conducting effective patient oral health education.
    3. Identify the seven learning theories and explain how to apply these to various patient-centered motivational techniques.
    4. Differentiate the four principles in utilizing appropriate teaching strategies for health instruction and list the criteria for selecting a teaching method for individualized instruction.
    5. Explore the pros and cons of various instructional materials and identify the critical design elements necessary in creating good instructional materials.
    6. Compare and contrast the differences between clinical or practical instruction versus didactic or knowledge acquisition instruction.
    7. Develop individualized patient oral health education curriculum and present educational instruction to a clinic patient during a series of counseling appointments.
    8. Develop a education lesson plan(s) by creating a minimum of three psychomotor, three affective and three performance objectives using established taxonomies of learning.
  
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    DHYG 331 Dental Hygiene Teaching Practicum (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An educational practicum introducing the student to best practices in dental hygiene teaching methods. Students will develop introductory lecture and/or lab instructional skills under the mentorship of Pierce College Dental Hygiene Faculty. The successful completion of this course may contribute to a portion of the Capstone Project in DHYG 439 or DHYG 474. This course is optional for all BASDH students; it is not required for the BASDH degree.

    Student Outcomes
    While participating in the educational practicum, the student will successfully meet the following objectives:

    1. Complete FERPA training, and any other department or institutional required training, prior to beginning the practicum and practice all ethical and legal requirements as learned.

    2. Define, explain, and apply adult learning theories, best teaching practices, and motivational strategies in the creation of instructional materials, lesson plans, assignments, etc.

    3. Using course assigned/approved grading rubrics, teach and assess student performance using the following strategies: Adult learning theories and motivational strategies in the teaching process; Guiding the student laboratory or lecture experience; Evaluating the laboratory or lecture experience.

    4. Consistently demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to instruct the course objectives.

    5. Develop and self-assess professional teaching outcomes and instructional application of dental hygiene theory and techniques.
  
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    DHYG 400 Dental Hygiene Theory and Nutrition (1.5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The fifth in a series of eight linked courses to increase knowledge and comprehension of complex dental hygiene theory and science in order to facilitate the growth of advanced dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Continued development of theory and science from previously linked courses (DHYG 300, 310, 320) for clinical application in DHYG 401.
    2. Record and organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    3. Apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    4. Determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral diseases classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP).
    5. Organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    6. Demonstrate appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    7. Demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
    8. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
    9. Review of basic nutrition including proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals, energy conversion, etc.
    10. Review the processes of human digestion, absorption, transportation, and the metabolism of nutrients as it applies to oral health.
    11. Identify and discuss the food sources and nutrients essential for the development of healthy bone and teeth.
    12. Identify, assess and analyze food choices as it pertains to the caries or periodontal disease processes.
    12. During a patient dietary counseling session in a clinical setting, create and communicate an individualized nutritional plan to promote health (oral) and to reduce the risk of caries and periodontal disease processes using the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA).
  
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    DHYG 401 Dental Hygiene Practice (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The fourth in a series of seven linked courses focused on advanced development of knowledge and dental hygiene clinical skills learned in DHYG 301, 311 and 321, and required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene in a supervised clinical setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using current evidence-based science in a clinic setting on patients with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, accurately and consistently:
    a. record and organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    b. apply dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    c. interpret patient interview and clinical assessment data, applying principles of cariology to identify caries risk for individual patients in order to develop of a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    d. apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    e. determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral diseases classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP).
    f. record and organize steps for development of a dental hygiene diagnosis resulting in a patient care plan for dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    g. apply dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies).
    h. interpret patient interview and clinical assessment data, applying principles of cariology to identify caries risk for individual patients in order to develop of a dental hygiene treatment plan.
    i. apply treatment planning models to develop and implement appropriate patient education and treatment based on individual patient caries risk assessment.
    j. determine the appropriate procedures for dental hygiene therapy on adult and pedodontic patients for maintenance of oral health or treatment of oral disease classified by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) as gingivitis.
    k. determine appropriate referral needs for any given patient or case presentation.
    l. self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene therapy(ies) to assess whether you, and if applicable, your healthcare team rendered quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
    k. describe, treatment plan and implement introductory root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    2. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
    3. In a clinic setting with progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, specifically moderate periodontal diseases, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous courses DHYG 301, 311 and 320.
  
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    DHYG 405 Introduction to Periodontology II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Second in a series of three periodontology courses, DHYG 325, 405 and 415, providing the dental hygienist information on recognition and therapy of periodontal diseases. Content includes non-surgical periodontal therapy, root morphology, and the associated complications and variations to treatment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Review of treatment for plaque associated gingivitis, chronic periodontitis, and aggressive forms of periodontitis.
    2.Review select systemic diseases and their relationship in the progression, severity, and treatment of periodontal diseases. Infer knowledge to case studies.
    3. Identify and differentiate sonic and ultrasonic properties, functions, contraindications, use, and maintenance.
    4. Identify and discuss proper use of ultrasonic tips: Include each tip’s function and proper maintenance. (Lab for application in DHYG 415.)
    5. Accurately identify the principles of air-polishing including indications and contraindications. (Lab for application in DHYG 415.)
    5. Accurately define, discuss and apply periodontal maintenance criteria.
    6. Accurately justify, compare, contrast and extrapolate criteria for individual patient cases in determining periodontal maintenance regimen.
    7. Accurately identify and discuss for the adult dentition, root morphology, periodontal instruments, and periodontal  instrumentation. Include designating indications for specific instrument selection using the instruments from the current instrument issue.
    8. Demonstrate correct sharpening techniques for the periodontal instruments introduced in this course.
    9. Synthesize and utilize applicable knowledge from DHYG 325 to enhance learning in DHYG 415.
  
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    DHYG 406 Pain Management II: Nitrous Oxide Sedation (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This course provides a comprehensive study of the proper diagnosis and use of nitrous oxide sedation for the dental office.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems as they pertain to the effects of drugs used for conscious sedation.
    2. Identify the basic components of the inhalation sedation equipment and explain the function of each.
    3. List the causes of medical and industrial safety hazards associated with nitrous-oxide use in dentistry.
    4. Describe the prevention and management of waste gas.
    5. Explain all existing state laws, OSHA, and WISHA regulations relating to the use of nitrous-oxide and other anesthetic drugs used by dental personnel.
    6. List the significant medical pre-evaluation considerations for a patient receiving nitrous-oxide sedation including all contraindications and alterations to care.
    7. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of inhalation sedation with nitrous-oxide oxygen.
    8. Explain the complications associated with nitrous-oxide oxygen sedation and describe the prevention, recognition, and management of these complications.
    9. Administer nitrous-oxide oxygen sedation to patients in a clinical setting in a safe, effective manner.
  
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    DHYG 407 Restorative Dentistry III (1.5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Continued development of advanced techniques in the placement, carving and polishing of dental amalgam restorations and composite restorations on the adult dentition. Introduction of dental restorative theories related to advanced techniques and procedures of modern dental materials. A basic overview of endodontics and vitality testing included as part of assessing a patient’s pain complaint.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinical acceptable level for:
    a. advanced placement and carving (specifically adjacent proximal restorations) of amalgam and composite restorations.
    b. placement of various alternative matrix systems available for composite and amalgam restorations.
    c. the correct use of overhang removal systems (hand instrument, mechanical finishing/polishing instrument, high speed handpieces) for the various classifications of dental restoration overhangs.
    d. accurate shade selection and layering techniques to enhance the esthetic appearance of composite restorations.
    e. placement of various dental bonding agents.
    f. placement of Class IV restorations using a celluloid form or free hand method.
    g. self-assessment of restorative application/lab outcomes using the current licensing examination standards and best practices.
    2. Describe and discuss the rationale for restorative treatment sequencing and planning using and considering all variables and restorative procedures.
    3. Accurately describe the placement techniques for: a) composite veneers; b) diastema closure; and c) Class IV composite restorations and procedures.
    4. Correctly describe the usage, history and theories of various dental bonding agents used under composite and amalgam restorations.
    5. Discuss and compare the rationale of various matrix systems as they relate to tooth position, arch location, depth and breadth of tooth preparation, and restorative material.
    6. In all setting, demonstrate professional, compassionate communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss restorative procedures with patients, peers and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster good oral health and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 409 Ethics & Critical Reasoning (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    An integrative, critical reasoning and self-reflective course which focuses on the ethical and legal issues facing the dental hygienist of today and in the future.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define ethical terminology and evaluate the ethical principles in the decision-making process of the dental hygienist.
    2. Describe and apply the values, ethical concepts, and the American Dental Hygienists’ Code of Ethics that support the principles of dental/dental hygiene ethics.
    3. Review and discuss the structure, purpose and importance of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association to the profession of dental hygiene.
    4. Explore, analyze and apply models for ethical reasoning and critical thinking to the six professional roles of the dental hygienist using case-based scenarios.
    5. Begin development of your Professional Development Plan (PDP) using critical thinking and ethical considerations while incorporating the six roles of a dental hygienist.
    6. Review and analyze current legislature, at the state level, nationally and globally, as it relates to the current practice of and future of the dental hygienist.
    7. Identify the six roles of the dental hygienist as a member of the healthcare team: educator, researcher, consumer advocate, change agent, administrator and clinician as part of your ePortfolio development.
  
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    DHYG 410 Advanced Dental Hygiene Theory & Practice Management I (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The sixth in a series of eight linked courses to increase knowledge and comprehension of complex dental hygiene theory, science and practice management in order to facilitate the growth of advanced dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter-intra-professional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. clinical competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.
    2. With progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, specifically moderate to advanced periodontal diseases on patients with significant health or dental management concerns, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous courses (DHYG 300, 310, 320, 400).
    3.Using current evidence-based science with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs (moderate to advanced periodontal diseases) and complicated by systemic disease(s), accurately and consistently:
    a. Identify and treatment plan root planing techniques on patients requiring this advanced dental hygiene therapy.
    b. Accurately identify and describe the criteria for conducting a microbial assay on an appropriate patient using the correct technique.
    c. continue to develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous linked courses (DHYG 300, 310, 320, 400).
    4. Demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    5. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.
    6. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 411 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice I (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The fifth in a series of seven linked courses to develop advanced dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. This course applies knowledge in dental hygiene theory and science from DHYG 410. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter-intra-professional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. clinical competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.

    2. In a clinic setting with progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, specifically moderate to advanced periodontal diseases on patients with significant health or dental management concerns, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous lab and clinical courses (DHYG 301, 311, 321, 401).

    3.Using current evidence-based science in a clinical setting on patients with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs (moderate to advanced periodontal diseases) and complicated by systemic disease(s), accurately and consistently:
    a. increased proficiency in all aspects of dental hygiene therapy without compromising patient treatment outcomes/care.
    b. the correct application of ultrasonic instrumentation including tip and patient selection.
    c. identify, treatment plan and implement developing root planing techniques on patients requiring this advanced dental hygiene therapy.
    d. apply the accurate CDT codes for legal documentation, accuracy of patient oral health records, and correct fee reimbursement as applicable.
    e. Accurately identify and describe the criteria for conducting a microbial assay on an appropriate patient using the correct technique.
    f. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.

    4. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    5. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 415 Advanced Periodontology (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    A continuation of DHYG 325 and 405 focused on advanced, scientific methods and technology used in dental hygiene examination, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with periodontal diseases.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and apply occlusion principles as they relate to the periodontium and periodontal diseases.
    2. Discuss rationale for occlusal adjustments and occlusal evaluations.
    3. Cite and demonstrate the procedural steps for conducting an occlusal evaluation. (Lab linked to DHYG 411.)
    4. Discuss the purpose and indication for orthodontics as it relates to periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy.
    5. Identify various occlusal splints and discuss their properties, function, advantages, and disadvantages.
    6. Discuss rationale and demonstrate procedural steps in re-evaluation using current prognostic and diagnostic skills.
    7. Analyze the indications, objectives, and goals of osseous (resective) surgery.
    8. Analyze the indications, objectives, and goals of various soft and hard tissue grafting techniques, crown lengthening, gingivoplasty, ridge augmentation, and any other best practices of current surgical techniques.
    9.Accurately describe and discuss dental implant care.
    10.Discuss and describe the various lasers for use in periodontal therapy and their functions.
    11.Discuss and describe indications, contraindications/limitations, and potential future applications for lasers in periodontal therapy.
    12.Accurately define and discuss periodontal maintenance criteria for application in clinical patient care.
    13.Accurately justify, compare, contrast and extrapolate criteria for individual patient cases in determining periodontal maintenance regimen for application in clinical patient care.
    14. Discuss the criteria for, advantages and disadvantages, and describe the use of local antimicrobials/chemotherapeutic agents and adjunctive therapies. (Demonstration to an acceptable beginning level conducted in DHYG 411-431 series.)
    15. Identify and evaluate current systemic antibiotic therapies in periodontal treatment, their indications, rationale for use, contraindications, and goals of therapy.
  
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    DHYG 416 Pain Management III: Adjunctive Techniques (0.5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    This course builds on the foundations of Pain Management I (DHYG 326). Students will be introduced to supplemental and alternative injection techniques, computerized and specialized injection devices, and new drugs and other technologies for use in dentistry. Students will practice new injection techniques and experience a variety of specialty dental injection devices in lab situations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Consistently and accurately, demonstrate and apply;
    a. knowledge of head and neck anatomy the pertinent to supplemental and alternative local anesthetic injections covered in this course to include: Gow-Gates, infra-orbital, Periodontal Ligament (PDL), mylohyoid, intraosseous
    b. proficiency in the principles for safe and effective administration of dental local anesthetics
    c. clinically acceptable techniques for each injection introduced
    d. knowledge of all components of adjunctive delivery devices introduced safe and effective handling, use, and maintenance of adjunctive delivery devices introduced
    e. selection of local anesthetic agents and calculation of drug doses and the MRDs for each drug based on patient assessment factors.

    2. Describe and discuss common local anesthetic complications and their prevention and treatment for injections introduced.

    3. Identify and discuss proper symptomatic treatment of medical emergencies related to complications for injections introduced.

    4. Describe and discuss the pharmacology and mechanism of action of local anesthetic agents, commonly used vasoconstrictors, and the impact of local anesthesia reversal drugs.
  
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    DHYG 417 Clinical Restorative Dentistry I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    First in a series of three courses providing a culmination of the information and skills learned in didactic, lab and clinic settings from DHYG 277, 287, 317, 327 and 407, and transferred to beginning clinical restorative skills in the placement, carving and polishing of amalgam restorations and the placement and finishing of composite restorations on patients.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In a lab setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level all Student Outcomes in the dental hygiene curriculum associated with the safe, legal and ethical practice of dental hygiene in providing patient care are to be applied accurately and consistently in the restorative clinic setting.

    2. In a lab or clinic setting using patients, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level:
    a. interpreting a comprehensive health history, including a social, medical, medication, and dental history, and identify any alterations to care based on the interpretation.
    b. organizing steps for implementation of restorative procedures and record restorative treatment provided to a patient.
    c. self-directed learning by identifying personal learning needs, setting specific goals for clinical practice to improve skills and self-evaluate progress.
    d. the application of proper care and maintenance of the dental unit and related equipment.
    e. for effective, appropriate and safe local anesthetic agents and employ pain control methods for any given clinical restorative patient.
    f. ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Program and Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    g. in analyzing any given tooth prior to preparation for a restoration and identify appropriate anatomy to correctly recreate in the final restoration.
    h. in routinely applying effective and correct isolation of tooth (teeth) being treated as appropriate for any given restorative treatment plan.

    3. In a restorative clinic setting, accurately and consistently demonstrate correct selection and placement of matrix bands and devices for composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment plan.
    a. the correct placement of appropriate base/liner/sealer materials under composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment plan.
    b. the selection of appropriate composite resin material(s) and shade(s), demonstrate correct placement of composite and amalgam restorative materials, and demonstrate correct carving, finishing and polishing of composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    c. reproduction of clinical functional anatomy with composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    d. self-assess your application of restorative care, using principles of acceptable restorative techniques, occlusion principles, and properties of a restorative filling for the respective material used, to ensure quality, evidence-based treatment and documentation to assess whether you and your healthcare team rendered quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)

    4. In a restorative clinic setting, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and healthcare teams to foster health and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 418 Service Learning & Special Populations (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Acquaints the student with the psychosocial and physical changes in the aging process and of special needs patients. Explores how these changes relate to oral health services in institutional, assisted-living, and family-centered settings. Further develops the dental hygienist as an integral member of the global healthcare team through participation in service learning experiences for special needs population cohorts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate regional, state, and national laws and policies for potential impact on the provision of oral health care for geriatric and disabled individuals.
    2. Recognize physical, mental, medical, social, and special oral health needs of population cohorts.
    3. Describe characteristics of specific disabling conditions to include: etiology incidence and prevalence, medical and dental treatment guidelines, and communication protocols.
    4. Identify and compare community agencies, health networks, and healthcare professionals involved in the provision of oral health services for geriatric and special needs population cohorts.
    5. Identify and analyze potential barriers for geriatric and persons with disabilities and possible solutions.
    6. Identify wheelchair transfer techniques and utilize them appropriately in both clinical and community settings.
    7. Design and/or modify oral self-care practices for specific populations in collaboration with other healthcare professionals to best serve community needs.
    8. Identify and expound on the six roles of the dental hygienist as a member of the healthcare team: educator, researcher, consumer advocate, change agent, administrator and clinician as part of your ePortfolio development.
    9. Participate in service learning projects targeted towards special needs population cohorts.
    10. Compare and contrast the differences between clinical or practical instruction versus didactic or knowledge acquisition instruction.
  
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    DHYG 420 Advanced Dental Hygiene Theory & Practice Management II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The seventh in a series of eight linked courses to increase knowledge and comprehension of advanced dental hygiene theory, science and practice management in order to facilitate the growth of increasingly complex dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter-intraprofessional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. clinical competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.
    2. Analyze and synthesize the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity.
    3. Identify and describe the clinical role of the dental hygienist as a member of the oral healthcare team .
    4. Participate in program selected professional development.
    5. Fully participate in and complete comprehensive, guided studies to prepare for the National Dental Hygiene Board Exam.
    6. Using current evidence-based science in a clinic setting on patients with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs (moderate to advanced periodontal diseases) and complicated by systemic disease(s), accurately and consistently:
    a. continue to develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous linked courses (DHYG 300, 310, 320, 400, 410).
    b. identify and treatment plan root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    c. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    7. In all settings, demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 421 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice II (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The sixth in a series of seven linked courses to further develop advanced dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter-intraprofessional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. clinical competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.

    2. Analyze and synthesize the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity.

    3. Using current evidence-based science in a clinic setting on patients with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs (moderate to advanced periodontal diseases) and complicated by systemic disease(s), accurately and consistently:
    a. continue to develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous pre-clinical and clinical courses (DHYG 301, 311, 321, 401, 411).
    b. increase proficiency in all aspects of dental hygiene therapy without compromising patient treatment outcomes/care.
    c. use the correct application of ultrasonic instrumentation including tip and patient selection.
    d. identify, treatment plan and implement developing root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    e. apply the accurate CDT codes for legal documentation, accuracy of patient oral health records, and correct fee reimbursement as applicable.
    f. Accurately identify and describe the criteria for conducting a microbial assay on an appropriate patient using the correct technique.
    g. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.

    4. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    5. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 427 Clinical Restorative Dentistry II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Second in a series of three courses providing a culmination of the information and skills learned in didactic, pre-clinic and clinic settings from DHYG 277, 287, 317, 327, 407, 417, and transferred to developing clinical restorative skills in the placement, carving and polishing of amalgam restorations and the placement and finishing of composite restorations on patients.

    Student Outcomes
    1. The student will continue development of all Student Outcomes from DHYG 277, 287, 317, 327, 407, and specifically, 417, in a lab and clinical patient setting.
    2. In a lab or clinic setting, accurately and consistently describe and perform techniques for multiple adjacent restorations.
    3. In a lab or clinic setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level (the):
    a. interpretation of a comprehensive health history, including a social, medical, medication, and dental history, and identify any alterations to care based on the interpretation.
    b. organizational steps for implementation of restorative procedures and recording of restorative treatment provided to a patient.
    b. self-directed learning by identifying personal learning needs, setting specific goals for clinical practice to improve skills and self-evaluate progress.
    c. the application of proper care and maintenance of the dental unit and related equipment.
    d. effective, appropriate and safe administration of local anesthetic agents employing pain control methods for any given restorative patient.
    e. ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Program and Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    f. analysis of any given tooth prior to preparation for a restoration and identification of appropriate anatomy to correctly recreate the final restoration.
    g. routine application of effective and correct isolation of teeth (a tooth) being treated as appropriate for any given restorative treatment plan.

    4. In a restorative clinic setting, accurately and consistently demonstrate correct selection and placement of matrix bands and devices for composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment and:
    a. the correct placement of appropriate base/liner/sealer materials under composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment plan.
    b. the correct selection of composite resin material(s) and shade(s),
    c. demonstrate correct placement of composite and amalgam restorative materials,
    d. demonstrate correct carving, finishing and polishing of composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    e. reproduce the clinical functional anatomy with composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    f. self-assess your application of restorative care, using principles of acceptable restorative techniques, occlusion principles, and properties of a restorative filling for the respective material used, to ensure quality, evidence-based treatment and documentation to assess whether you and your healthcare team rendered quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
    5. In a restorative clinic setting, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and healthcare teams to foster health and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 428 Research Methodologies (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Introduces and develops principles of oral health research design. The course includes public health theory and practice, determinants and indicators of health disparities, epidemiology, biostatistics, community-based preventive practices, and management of oral diseases. Uses APA formatting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the basic components of scientific research, perform critical evaluations of the scientific literature, and prepare scientific reports.
    2. Demonstrate basic biostatistic knowledge and demonstrate skills in applying dental indices used in epidemiological studies.
    3. Identify and define the principles of community health programs and the components of the oral health care delivery system as an integral member of the healthcare team.
    4. Identify the role of dental public health in the delivery of oral health promotion and disease prevention services in the public and private sectors.
    5. Using sociodemographic, biological, behavioral, cultural and political factors, define the general principles of health promotion and disease prevention and analyze them as they relate to oral health.
    6. As a member of a healthcare team, identify and describe health policies that have had a major impact on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of oral diseases.
    7. Identify and compare community organizations, agencies, and institutions that can be used as resources for program development, implementation, and evaluation.
    8. Identify and compare the components of preventive, community health program development, and synthesize the focus of oral health education in terms of understanding preventive policy and the educational process.
    9. Identify and utilize the components of critical writing skills from dental or dental hygiene journals in analyses and development of professional writing.
    10. Provide community service through involvement in regional service learning projects.
    11. Research, develop and present a team scientific research project to be presented at a state conference
  
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    DHYG 430 Advanced Dental Hygiene Theory & Practice Management III (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The eighth in a series of eight linked courses to increase knowledge and comprehension of advanced dental hygiene theory, science and practice management in order to facilitate the growth of increasingly complex dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter and intra-professional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.
    2. Describe and discuss the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity.
    3. Identify and describe the clinical role of the dental hygienist as a member of the oral healthcare team.
    4. Participate in program selected professional development.
    5. Create a cover letter and curriculum vitae for use in application to a variety of environments and roles of employment for the dental hygienist.
    6. Research the role of the oral health care provider in Emergency Preparedness.
    7. Create an Emergency Preparedness Individual Plan as part of the ePortfolio.
    8. Expanding on previous dental hygiene curricular coursework, develop personal, health promotion strategies identifying personal characteristics and career strategies as part of your professional development plan (PDP).
    9. Demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    10. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.
    11. Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 431 Advanced Dental Hygiene Practice III (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    The seventh in a series of seven linked courses to further develop competence in dental hygiene clinical skills required for the safe and effective practice of dental hygiene. Collect and analyze quantitative and qualitative data using American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using your clinical, inter and intra-professional, didactic and professional association activities, continue development of your ePortfolio showing evidence of continued growth and documentation:
    a. clinical competency in the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity; successful or reasonable patient treatment outcomes; optional or recommended treatment needs rendered by other oral health professionals and as appropriately referred; and dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, scheduling, case documentation and presentation using clinic and office technology to an acceptable level.

    2. Describe and discuss at the developing to competent level of the safe and effective practice of clinical dental hygiene skills in order to comprehensively treat persons/patients with an increasing level of oral disease(s) severity.

    3. Identify and describe the clinical role of the dental hygienist as a member of the oral healthcare team.

    4. Expanding on previous dental hygiene curricular coursework, develop personal, health promotion strategies identifying personal characteristics and career strategies as part of your professional development plan (PDP).

    5. In a clinic setting with progressively more complex patient oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs, specifically moderate to advanced periodontal diseases on patients with significant health or dental history management concerns, continue to accurately and consistently develop skills in all Student Outcomes from previous courses DHYG 301, 311, 321, 401, 411 and 421.

    6.Using current evidence-based science in a clinic setting on patients with progressively more complex oral health dental hygiene therapy(ies) needs (moderate to advanced periodontal diseases) and complicated by systemic disease(s), accurately and consistently:
    a. demonstrate the application of ultrasonic instrumentation including tip and patient selection.
    b. increase proficiency in all aspects of dental hygiene therapy without compromising patient treatment outcomes/care.
    c. identify, treatment plan and implement developing root planing techniques on patients requiring this dental hygiene therapy.
    d. apply the accurate CDT codes for legal documentation, accuracy of patient oral health records, and correct fee reimbursement as applicable.
    e. Accurately identify and describe the criteria for conducting a microbial assay on an appropriate patient using the correct technique.
    f. demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Student Handbook and accompanying Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.

    7. Demonstrate professionalism and communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster wellness and healthy behaviors.

    8.Consistently and accurately self-assess your application of dental hygiene theory and techniques in patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, treatment planning, radiology, treatment documentation and dental hygiene skills to develop the ability to assess yourself, and if applicable, your healthcare team to confirm and verify quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
  
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    DHYG 437 Clinical Restorative Dentistry III (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Third in a series of three courses providing a culmination of the information and skills learned in didactic, pre-clinic and clinic settings from DHYG 277, 287, 317, 327, 407, 417, 427, and transferred to developing clinical restorative skills in the placement, carving and polishing of amalgam restorations and the placement and finishing of composite restorations on patients.

    Student Outcomes
    1. The student will continue development of all Student Outcomes from DHYG 277, 287, 317, 327, 407, 417 and specifically, 427, in a lab and clinical patient setting.
    2. In a lab or clinic setting, accurately and consistently describe and perform techniques for multiple adjacent restorations.
    3. In a lab or clinic setting, consistently describe, identify and/or demonstrate competent skills to a clinically acceptable level (the):
    a. interpretation of a comprehensive health history, including a social, medical, medication, and dental history, and identify any alterations to care based on the interpretation.
    b. organizational steps for implementation of restorative procedures and recording of restorative treatment provided to a patient.
    b. self-directed learning by identifying personal learning needs, setting specific goals for clinical practice to improve skills and self-evaluate progress.
    c. the application of proper care and maintenance of the dental unit and related equipment.
    d. effective, appropriate and safe administration of local anesthetic agents employing pain control methods for any given restorative patient.
    e. ethical and professional behaviors consistent with a dental hygiene professional, and in compliance with the policies and procedures detailed in the Pierce College Student Handbook, the Pierce College Dental Hygiene Program and Clinic Policies, and the American Dental Hygiene Associations’ Code of Ethics.
    f. analysis of any given tooth prior to preparation for a restoration and identification of appropriate anatomy to correctly recreate the final restoration.
    g. routine application of effective and correct isolation of teeth (a tooth) being treated as appropriate for any given restorative treatment plan.

    4. In a restorative clinic setting, accurately and consistently demonstrate correct selection and placement of matrix bands and devices for composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment and:
    a. the correct placement of appropriate base/liner/sealer materials under composite and amalgam restorations for any given restorative treatment plan.
    b. the correct selection of composite resin material(s) and shade(s),
    c. demonstrate correct placement of composite and amalgam restorative materials,
    d. demonstrate correct carving, finishing and polishing of composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    e. reproduce the clinical functional anatomy with composite and amalgam restorative materials for any given restorative treatment plan.
    f. self-assess your application of restorative care, using principles of acceptable restorative techniques, occlusion principles, and properties of a restorative filling for the respective material used, to ensure quality, evidence-based treatment and documentation to assess whether you and your healthcare team rendered quality patient care. (Quality patient care parameters will vary from patient to patient.)
    5. In a restorative clinic setting, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and healthcare teams to foster health and healthy behaviors.
  
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    DHYG 438 Community Oral Health Practicum (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Integration of instructional and research application. Entails exploring the role of the dental hygienist in public health agenda, community outreach services, advocacy, and business management as an integral member, leader, and agent of change in the inter-disciplinary healthcare team.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Acquire, understand, process, and draw conclusions from information using observation, analysis, interpretation, speculation and evaluation.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to identify problems and engage in problem-solving using alternative answers.
    3. Demonstrate civic, social and environmental responsibility appropriate to the community.
    4. Demonstrate an awareness of the implications of sound oral health practices.
    5. Function effectively under conditions of ambiguity, uncertainty, and conflict.
    6. Recognize and explain the oral health status and oral health needs of high-risk populations as it relates to establishing business definitions, market strategy, and service line products.
    7. Describe and utilize criteria for selection of appropriate target populations for community oral health programs and prospective business entities.
    8. Explain and utilize the components of community oral health program development;
    a) Assessment, b) Planning, c) Implementation, d) Evaluation.
    9. Function as an effective community oral health educator for groups of people by utilizing appropriate criteria and techniques for dental surveying and educational instruction in the development of a business model.
    10. Develop the ability to write business plans and evaluate oral health program goals and objectives with understanding of their values and limitations.
    11. Apply and conduct evaluation principals and procedures to determine the extent to which specified community program goals and objectives have been attained through service learning projects and business development.
  
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    DHYG 439 Senior Seminar Capstone (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Currently enrolled in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene.

    Course Description
    Develop career strategies and leadership to build interdisciplinary teams that expand the vision of oral health professionals, culminating in a capstone project as part of an exiting ePortfolio.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Adapt to shifts in roles, settings, and obstacles that arise as a dental hygiene leader, with attention to ethical, financial, and management considerations.
    2. Design a community-based/global Emergency Management Plan integrating the dental hygienist into the healthcare emergency team.  
    3. Compare and contrast advanced and non-traditional dental hygiene therapies and emerging dental hygienist roles.
    4. Identify advanced and non-traditional dental hygienist employment settings to perform restorative and/or other advanced or non-traditional dental therapies, regionally and worldwide
  
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    DHYG 441 Extramural Practice I (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Externships in community dental facilities in Pierce, Thurston, Kitsap or King Counties that include specialty practice providers and mobile clinics to underserved clients who may be disabled, medical/physical compromised, and economically depressed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently provide preventive and definitive clinical dental hygiene services to:
    a. medically compromised and disabled patients.
    b. “high-risk” underserved patients.
    2. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate technical proficiency in the provision of clinical dental hygiene procedures with sensitivity to the physical, emotional, and social problems of the patient.
    3. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate proficiency in the use of special adaptive techniques and equipment for given disabled patients.
    4. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate the ability to adapt oneself to all types of clinical and community settings, personnel, and patients.
    5. Evaluate various employment possibilities.
    6. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
  
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    DHYG 451 Extramural Practice II (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in Bachelor of Applied Science in Dental Hygiene program.

    Course Description
    Externships in community dental facilities in Pierce and King Counties that include specialty practice providers and mobile clinics, for clients who may be medically compromised, low income, economically depressed, and high risk.

    Student Outcomes
    1. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently provide preventive and definitive clinical dental hygiene services to:
    a. medically compromised and disabled patients.
    b. “high-risk” underserved patients.
    2. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate technical proficiency in the provision of clinical dental hygiene procedures with sensitivity to the physical, emotional, and social problems of the patient.
    3. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate proficiency in the use of special adaptive techniques and equipment for given disabled patients.
    4. In inter-professional or intra-professional settings, accurately and consistently, demonstrate the ability to adapt oneself to all types of clinical and community settings, personnel, and patients.
    5. Evaluate various employment possibilities.
    6. In all settings, demonstrate professional communication skills using correct terminology and vocabulary necessary to discuss the oral health treatment plan and procedures with patients, peers, and other health care professionals and health care teams to foster health and health behavior.
  
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    DHYG 471 Research Design & Methods (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Graduate from a Washington State accredited dental hygiene program from 1973 or later with a dental hygiene license from the United States in good standing. MATH& 146  with a minimum grade of 2.5 or equivalent. A general associate transfer degree waives the math requirement. Acceptance into the Bridge BASDH program per current qualifications.

    Course Description
    This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of research and provides an overview of the scientific method to help students understand the research process.

    Student Outcomes
    1    Evaluate the role of research in the practice of dental hygiene.
    2    Assess the fundamental principles of the research process and design methodologies.
    3    Analyze data collection procedures used in the scientific method. 
    4    Analyze the role of ethics in the research process. 
    5    Critically evaluate evidence-based research in order to inform future practices and work within the broader healthcare community.
    6    Apply the fundamental principles of research and analysis using scientific writing.
    7    Interpret fundamental biostatistics and evidence-based epidemiology within healthcare systems.
  
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    DHYG 472 Service Learning: Healthcare Teams and Community Oral Health Practicum (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Acceptance into the Bridge BASDH program per current qualifications.

    Course Description
    A course incorporating dental public health agenda and the development and implementation of community-based targeted outreach services. An integration of instructional and research application. Entails exploring the role of the dental hygienist in public health agenda, community outreach services, advocacy, and business management as an integral member, leader, and agent of change in the inter-disciplinary healthcare team.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the various roles of a dental hygienist in a community-based setting.
    2. Self-assess application of professionalism and communication as related to the role of
    administrator manager, and/or public health advocate.
    3. Provide professional reflective peer evaluation using assessment criteria.
    4. Differentiate between service-learning and community-based programs.
    5. Identify the critical components of business plan development.
    6. Develop a written formal business proposal individualized to your specialty business development.
    7. Utilize promotional skills to present business plans to potential clients and/or investors.
    8. Identify community agencies, health networks, and healthcare professionals involved in the
    provision of (oral) health services for special needs and/or under-served populations.
    9. Design and/or modify oral self-care practices for specific populations to best serve community
    needs.
    10. Acquire practical experience in service learning projects specializing in the provision of services
    to special needs and/or under-served population cohorts.
    11. Self-reflect on individual learning experiences providing services to special needs and/or
    under-served populations.
    12. Collaborate with other healthcare and community-service professionals as an integral part of an
    interdisciplinary team.
  
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    DHYG 473 Course Development and Education Practicum (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Graduate from a Washington State accredited dental hygiene program from 1973 or later with a dental hygiene license from anywhere in the United States in good standing. Acceptance into the Bridge BASDH program per current qualifications.

    Course Description
    Students explore educational theories, philosophies, strategies, and assessments culminating in the development and implementation of a unit of instruction and lesson plan(s). Participation in clinical teaching observations, course set-up, grading, self-evaluation, educational curriculum development, student management, etc. will be emphasized.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Appreciate the importance of the accreditation process for ensuring the training and development of qualified healthcare providers
    2. Explore educational philosophies to develop a professional, educational philosophical statement.
    3. Analyze the responsibilities of the teacher and learner in clinical and didactic education.
    4. Discuss educational concepts and theories in clinical and didactic education
    5. Compare the differences between andragogical and pedagogical principles.
    6. Identify activities and experiences that enhance motivation in students.
    7. Compare learning through experience, self-directed learning and active learning principles.
    8. Explain appropriate teaching strategies used in structured and un-structured learning environments.
    9. Compare formative and summative assessment methods.
    10. Differentiate between various methods of assessment (including, but not limited to the purpose and types of evaluations, characteristics of performance and written tests, rubrics and checklists).
    11. Explain the principles of test construction, validity and reliability, comprehensiveness, objectivity, scoring, and assigning of grades.
    12. Choose an assessment method best aligned to attaining learning outcomes.
    13. Procure a teaching practicum (one lesson minimum) within an institution of higher education (preferably in a dental hygiene or dental assisting program).
    14. Develop measurable student performance (instructional) objectives to communicate instructional intent appropriate to a diverse adult learning environment.
    15. Use adult learning theories to develop a lesson plan of instruction to include the transfer of learning skills, while considering the learning styles and the varying needs, desires, and interests of the audience.
    16. Select and/or create instructional materials appropriate to the lesson objectives, audience, and desired outcomes.
    17. Select and/or create appropriate methods of evaluating students’ attainment of objectives, assessment tools, etc.
    18. Integrate appropriate educational methods when developing lesson plans, assignments, activities, and other course material.
    19. Apply best practices in classroom management techniques to enhance engagement and student learning.
    20. Create a self-assessment tool to evaluate teaching effectiveness.
    21. Demonstrate professionalism in all aspects before, during and after the teaching practicum.
    22. Demonstrate appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication skills (correct terminology, vocabulary, body language etc.) necessary to implement the intended lesson plan.
    23. Consistently and accurately self-assess application of dental hygiene theory, techniques in dental hygiene skills and effectiveness of teaching methods.
    24. Provide meaningful, constructive feedback to peers that is positive and motivating, while identifying areas that need improvement.
    25. Complete FERPA training, and any other department or institutional required training prior to beginning the teaching practicum.
    26. Practice all ethical and legal requirements as learned from department and institutional training.
    27. Uphold the Code of Conduct of the American Dental Hygiene Association in all activities.
  
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    DHYG 474 Senior Capstone, Critical Reasoning and Ethics (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Graduate from a Washington State accredited dental hygiene program from 1973 or later with a dental hygiene license from anywhere in the United States in good standing. Acceptance into the Bridge BASDH program per current qualifications.

    Course Description
    An integrative, critical reasoning and self-reflective course which focuses on the ethical and legal issues facing the dental hygiene leaders and educators. Develop career strategies and leadership to build interdisciplinary teams that expand the vision of oral health professionals, culminating in a capstone project as part of an exiting ePortfolio.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and apply ethical terminology and evaluate the ethical principles in the decision-making process of the dental hygienist.
    2. Describe and apply the values, ethical concepts, and the American Dental Hygienists’ Code of Ethics that support the principles of dental/dental hygiene ethics.
    3. Identify and analyze the laws pertaining to dentistry with special emphasis on dental hygiene and scope of practice.
    4. Identify and describe your state of residence’s process (es) for changing the scope of practice for dental hygienists and other oral healthcare providers.
    5. Review and discuss the structure, purpose, and importance of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association and the American Dental Educators’ Association in developing leaders and educators for the profession of dental hygiene.
    6. Explore, analyze, and apply models for ethical reasoning and critical thinking to the professional roles of the dental hygienist using case-based scenarios.
    7. Develop a non-clinical cover letter, a curriculum vitae, and a professional moral development statement.
    8. Investigate and identify potential roles for the dental hygienist as an integral member of the emergency management team in a natural or man-made disaster.
    9. Develop a cumulative Capstone Project which reflects one of the three focus areas of the Bridge BASDH program: research, public health, or education.

Digital Design

  
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    DDSGN 110 Introduction to Graphic Design and Rich Media (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Overview of the interactive Digital Design field. Introduction to teminology, changes, and trends, in the business and industry. Discussion of various media, such as image manipulation, internet, digital, video, sound and ethics.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Define terminology and recognize the context of the terminology related to each digital design format.
    2.Identify the history and trends of digital design vocations in order to recognize the fast pace market demands of workers.
    3.Research career options in digital design.
    4.Recognize the use of various digital design formats that include 3-D rendering, Web-page development, digital and video photography, and music and sound integration.
    5.Explore various digital design software through classroom demonstrations and/or lab experiences.
    6.Recognize differing ways of organizing information including linear and non-linear ways.
    7.Given multiple digital design products, evaluate the communication effectiveness of formats and organizational methods used and their intended messages for diverse audiences.
    8.Recognize ethical issues related to the field of digital design.
    9.Research issues related to labor union membership in digital design occupations.
  
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    DDSGN 120 Production Management (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will trace the production flow from creation to implementation for design projects. Specific content will include stages of analysis and development, principles of task management, and contract writing.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explore the elements of project management to include pre-production, production, post-production and delivery, and the theory behind efficient processes.
    2.Identify and create elements of pre-production and production such as project analysis and scope, personnel plan, detailed list of tasks, budget requirements, resources, time estimates, risks, contingency plans, and critical milestones.
    3.Identify and create elements of task management for a digital design project to include goal definition, monitoring, implementing, coordinating, and evaluating work processes.
    4.Prepare a design project proposal and contract for a client.
    5.Identify the elements of post-production to include product testing, troubleshooting, customer acceptance testing, and implementation.
    6.Research career options in graphic design and rich media.
    7.Identify and be able to access regulations and laws related to digital design.
  
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    DDSGN 121 Layout Design and Publishing (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Class explores and implements layout theory and design processes to create production projects using publishing production techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Examine the history, processes, and trends of layout design in the publishing industry.
    2.Create a variety of projects that visually communicate their ideas to a viewer.
    3.Explore different design styles and how the use of graphics and text impact the audience.
    4.Proofread and correct layout and text problems.
    5.Select appropriate file formats and conversion methods for a variety of digital design projects.
    6.Use a variety of hardware and software to create a desired project.
    7.Identify career options in layout design and publishing.
    8.Identify and apply regulations and laws related to the publishing world.
  
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    DDSGN 130 Graphic Design II (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 110  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Concept development in visual communication problem solving involving letter forms, illustrative material and typography. Basic principles of selection, organization, and production techniques are introduced.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Define terminology and recognize the context of the terminology related to graphic design and desktop publishing.
    2.Examine the history and trends of graphic design vocations in order to recognize the fast pace market demands of workers.
    3.Research career options in graphic design.
    4.Use various graphic design software and hardware in class projects.
    5.Apply letter forms, text, layout, and illustrative materials to classroom projects and activities.
    6.Recognize principles of selection, organization, and prouction.
    7.Apply principles of design (typology, format, layout) and creative problem solving to classroom projects and activities.
    8.Using a variety of graphic design principles and techniques, create a poster, brochure, catalog, flier, and an advertisement to appeal to multicultural audiences.
    9.Evaluate the quality and design of a variety of graphic products.
  
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    DDSGN 131 Techniques in Adobe Illustrator (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 110  with at least a 1.5 grade or equivalent Adobe Illustrator experience or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Production techniques in Adobe Illustrator. Class explores and implements vector imaging theory using fundamental concepts and processes to create works of art for print and the Web. A graphic tablet is recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Enhance artwork through use of effects and appearance attributes.
    2. Create custom patterns and styles and apply them to create or enhance artwork.
    3. Create complex gradients and layering to effectively blend images and shapes into compositions.
    4. Create original art by painting with custom brushes and editing tools.
    5. Convert, alter, add, and delete colors and textures of various vector images and line drawings.
    6. Compare and contrast various editing theories and practices.
    7. Evaluate the aesthetic and technical quality of various vector image projects and their appeal to the intended audience.
    8. Research career options in digital imaging.
    9. Demonstrate understanding and compliance with ethics related to the use of copyrighted materials.
  
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    DDSGN 140 Fundamentals of 3D Modeling and Animation (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Introduction to the theories and techniques for production of high quality 3D images and animation. Covers the history of the 3D industry, design philosophy and other vital elements of creative 3D design and animation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify various 3D modeling and animation software, hardware and terminology.
    2. Examine the history and philosophy of 3D animation.
    3. Explore basic composition and aesthetic elements of a 3D scene.
    4. Create 3D models by using various tools and techniques.
    5. Demonstrate scene composition including sense of scale, 3D depth, model surface texturing, lighting, and atmospheres.
    6. Analyze the impact the 3D camera using a variety of perspectives.
    7. Animate 3D graphics by using time-based and event-driven approaches.
    8. Using a variety of principles and techniques, create various 3D products including photo-realistic renders and special effects.
    9. Render 3D projects to various formats.
    10. Explore the philosophy of stereoscopy and 3D depth.
    11. Apply theories of design and principles of creative problem solving to classroom projects and activities.
    12. Evaluate the quality, design and emotional impact of a variety of 3D renderings.
    13. Comply with ethics related to the use of copyrighted material.
    14. Research career options in 3D modeling and animation.
  
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    DDSGN 141 Advanced 3D Modeling and Animation (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 140  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    Advanced exposure to the resources and applied procedures necessary to produce high quality 3-D products and animation for publication through electronic media.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify various 3-D rendering software and hardware.
    2.Create 3D particle system simulations.
    3.Apply volumetrics to lighting and particle animations.
    4.Create 3D models using primitive objects and manipulation tools.
    5.Create 3D models using points and polygon meshes.
    6.Apply principles of physics to animate a 3D character model.
    7.Create clothing and fabric simulations in a 3D environment.
    8.Arrange 3D lighting to emulate realistic lighting sources and atmospheres.
    9.Evaluate the quality and design of a variety of 3D renderings.
    10.Render 3-D graphic products to portable disk or recordable CD, DVD, or to a web streaming format.
    11.Comply with ethics related to the use of copyrighted material.
  
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    DDSGN 150 Introduction to User Experience Design (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is an introduction to user experience (UX) design to build a simple website using HTML and CSS through the process of planning, designing, and implementing the website. Students will learn the semantics of the HTML and CSS styling.

    Student Outcomes
    Define web design terminology and usability in context.
    Analyze the history and digital culture trends in the field of user experience (UX) design
    Analyze the target audience and personas to understand users’ needs and goals
    Integrate best practices of web color and font management, principles of design, web usability, and front-end web development in designing web pages
    Analyze concepts, goals or data to evaluate the solution of the product in UX design
    Create working web pages for various devices using mobile-first design principles
    Apply prototype techniques using a set of heuristic guidelines to evaluate a product

    8. Apply UX design principles in order to build both low-fidelity and high-fidelity interactive systems
  
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    DDSGN 151 Mobile User Interface Design (5 credits)



    Course Description
    In this course students will learn how to design and prototype mobile user interface (UI) to address solution-based design tasks. Students will learn the core principles of human-centered design and core context of user experience (UX).

    Student Outcomes
    Apply user-centered design and methods to mobile prototypes
    Apply the process of UX design, including conducting user research methods, sitemap, wireframes, prototypes, evaluation, and the needs for iteration
    Apply the fundamentals of concepts, principles of UI/UX design, and techniques associated with the practice of UX design to mobile prototypes
    Identify the appropriate target audience for your brand
    Design and develop responsive layouts for multiple screen sizes
    Understand the industry-standard toolkit in UI/UX design
    Analyze an interaction design problem and a user-centered process
  
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    DDSGN 160 Fundamentals of Digital Photography and Adobe Photoshop (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to visual concepts, image capture and functions of digital cameras. Explores the techniques and applications of correcting, manipulating and outputting digitized photographic images and digital artwork utilizing Adobe Photoshop.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify various digital photography equipment and camera functions.
    2.Explore aesthetic elements of visual images.
    3.Capture still images using a digital camera using basic composition rules.
    4.Correct digital photographic images using Adobe Photoshop.
    5.Compare, contrast and practice digital manipulation theories and techniques within Adobe Photoshop.
    6.Use digital images for the creation of on-screen and printed artwork that appeal to multicultural audiences.
    7.Evaluate the aesthetic and technical quality of various images and their appeal to the intended audience.
    8.Convert digital images to appropriate file formats for Web and print and store or archive correctly.
    9.Research career options in digital photography.
    10.Comply with ethics and copyright laws related to the use of digital images.
  
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    DDSGN 161 Advanced Adobe Photoshop (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 160  with at least a 1.5 grade or equivalent Adobe Photoshop experience or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Advanced production techniques in Adobe Photoshop. Class explores and implements digital imaging theory and processes to enhance and retouch photographs and create new works of art.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Enhance photographs through advanced sharpening, blurring and noise reduction techniques.
    2. Create complex layering to effectively blend images into compositions.
    3. Create original art by painting with custom brushes and edit tools.
    4. Convert, alter, add, and delete colors and textures of various photographs and line drawings.
    5. Evaluate the aesthetic and technical quality of various digital imaging projects and their appeal to the intended audience.
    6. Compare and contrast various editing theories and practices.
    7. Research career options in digital imaging.
    8. Demonstrate compliance with ethics related to the use of copyrighted materials.
  
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    DDSGN 170 Fundamentals of Video Production (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The study of video production techniques utilizes current and historical elements of design and composition theory to introduce digital formats such as video, still images, sound, and music into digital production.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine the history of film and video.
    2. Write in industry standard script and draft in storyboard formats.
    3. Practice various composition techniques and apply the theory behind them.
    4. Capture and record audio and video signals in digital formats.
    5. Edit and re-master video files and digital audio on the computer.
    6. Compress and convert digital audio and video into various delivery platforms.
    7. Evaluate the philosophy, aesthetics and technical quality of various productions and their appeal to the intended audience.
    8. Compare and contrast various interface theories and practices.
    9. Research career options in digital audio/video.
    10. Comply with ethics related to the use of audio and video copyrighted materials.
  
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    DDSGN 180 Fundamentals of 3D Game Design (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Create high quality 3D video games using Unity 3D. Learn game development design principles and practices. Create, acquire, modify and integrate assets such as sounds, music and 3D models while learning how to build interactive 3D worlds.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and navigate Unity 3D layout, panes and tabs.
    2. Select, move, rotate, scale, snap and parent objects.
    3. Import 3D models, textures and scripts.
    4. Add components to a game object.
    5. Identify and apply rigid body dynamics and colliders.
    6. Add meshes to a scene.
    7. Apply behavior scripting for procedural object instantiation and scoring.
    8. Use procedural and Mecanim character animation.
    9. Apply various types of lighting to a scene.
    10. Apply principles of game design to create a solid user experience.
    11. Identify and explore different delivery options for video games.
    12. Comply with ethics related to the use of copyrighted materials.
  
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    DDSGN 210 Fundamentals of Motion Graphics and Interactive Media (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 160  and DDSGN 170  with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these classes or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the principles and elements of motion graphic design and to the design and delivery of interactive media projects. Learn the theoretical aspects of media and interactivity as they create content-driven design and animation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Design and complete professional quality motion-based projects.
    2. Demonstrate the relationship between typography principles and animation and interactivity fundamentals.
    3. Create interactive media in both a 2D and 3D environment.
    4. Apply principles of design (format, layout, hierarchy, interactivity) and creative problem solving to classroom interactive projects.
    5. Use a variety of principles and techniques to create an interactive presentation incorporating design, sound, photography, graphics, and video.
    6. Provide historical and current philosophical perspectives in the area of motion graphics.
    7. Evaluate quality, design and interactivity of media projects.
    8. Output products to a variety of delivery platforms and formats.
    9. Appraise various software in media design.
    10. Demonstrate the ethical use of media materials.
    11. Research career options that involve motion graphics and interactive media creation.
  
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    DDSGN 211 2D Animation with Adobe Animate (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Learn a variety of techniques to create 2D animations using Adobe Animate. Practice animation techniques and analyze their impact on an audience. This course will review the technical and historical evolution of animation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine the Adobe Animate working environment and define its terminology.
    2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the Adobe Animate drawing tools and their functions.
    3. Examine and employ the different types of animation Adobe Animate supports.
    4. Analyze various animation theories and philosophies and examine how they impact an audience.
    5. Create characters, prepare them for animation and add expression and motion.
    6. Create storyboards and animatics in preparation to make an animated video story.
    7. Incorporate audio into animations and evaluate its effectiveness.
    8. Identify and compare historical animation techniques and tools with current methods.
    9. Using animation and video editing tools, prepare an animation for delivery on the web.
    10. Evaluate the quality, design and impact of a variety of animation projects.
  
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    DDSGN 215 Advanced User Experience Design (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 150 Introduction to User Experience Design  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course is an advanced course of interaction design focusing on user experience design for digital interactive platforms. Topics covered include human computer interaction (HCI) and user experience design (UXD). Students will design and build interactive prototypes and interfaces using practical front-end development techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    Analyze and conduct user research related to web usability
    Demonstrate the construction of UX design by applying competitive analysis, scenario-based design, and storyboarding
    Develop and prototype UX design concepts to potential design solutions
    Design a responsive website using current web markup, styling, and script languages
    Adapt and apply modern responsive frameworks and embed social media content into webpages
    Apply basic techniques for marketing, including SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and email marketing
    Develop a fully functioning website that can be used on cross platforms
    Apply website validation using cross browser testing
  
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    DDSGN 230 Portfolio (5 credits)



    Prerequisite DDSGN 210  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Integration of all aspects of digital design into the development of portfolio projects from concept to final production, along with employment strategies and long-term professional development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply principles of selection, organization, production, design, and creative problem solving to portfolio creation.
    2. Apply a variety of design principles and techniques–including still images (traditional and digital), video, layout design, web design, and animation–to produce a print, motion graphics, and an online interactive portfolio.
    3. Evaluate the quality and design of components used by you and your peers in creating portfolio projects.
    4. Prepare for a job interview by utilizing a variety of self-assessment tools and practice interview questions.
    5. Design a résumé reflecting a job objective, accomplishments, and education that is cohesive with the design of an online portfolio.
    6. Research and discuss career-specific digital design topics to prepare for successful entry into the digital design career field.
    7. Identify support systems available after graduation for networking and lifelong learning.
    8. Demonstrate compliance with ethics related to the use of copyrighted material.
  
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    DDSGN 290 Supervised Internship (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Digital Design Majors.

    Course Description
    Capstone course allows the student to gain relevant experience working in a local business environment.  Requires 90 hours of supervised work, including associated resume preparation, job interviews, and experience documentation. Students must earn a minimum of 2.0 in DDSGN 290 in order to obtain an Associate in Digital Design.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Interview for a job with a local design business.
    2. Apply previously-learned classroom skills and knowledge in a work-based design environment.
    3. Identify opportunities for further training in order to create a professional development plan.
    4. Develop a professional résumé based on education, certification, work experience and additional training.

Drama

  
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    DRMA 160 Introduction to Film and Video (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 160

    Course Description
    Introduction to and exploration of the world of movies film, history, filmmaking, techniques, and film direction. The social and economic influences of the American film will also addressed.

    Student Outcomes
    Student learning objectives:

    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Critically analyze films for plot, character, setting, style, and theme through script analyses and film viewing.
    2.Critically analyze the elements of film production including direction, cinematography, script, lighting, props, setting, acting, editing, sound, costumes, special effects, makeup, and music.
    3.Describe the basic elements of composition and design as they relate to film.
    4.Describe the process of distribution and exhibition of film in the United States and internationally.
    5.Describe and analyze the history of film.
    6.Compare and contrast styles and genres of film through script analyses and film attendance.
    7.Describe, compare, and contrast film forms.
    8.Analyze documentary, experimental, and animated film.
    9.Critically analyze the relationship between film form and culture.
  
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    DRMA 165 Digital Movie Making I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 165

    Course Description
    This is an introduction class in making movies using the digital format. Story telling, filming, editing, and presentation will be covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1.List and explain the requirements for a digital film script.
    2.Develop a schedule and storyboard for a digital film.
    3.Design a digital video workstation.
    4.Analyze and describe videotape formats.
    5.Design effective lighting for digital film.
    6.Demonstrate the use of appropriate set dressing for digital film.
    7.Demonstrate the use of special effects in digital films.
    8.Incorporate the use of effective sound techniques for digital film.
    9.Compare and contrast editing systems for digital film.
    10.Incorporate the use of effective editing techniques for content and story.
    11.Design effective color correction for image enhancement for digital film.
    12.Compare and contrast digital outputs based on purpose and media requirements.
    13.Produce a five-minute digital video for an educational, social, or professional organization.
    14.Produce a ten-minute digital video demonstrating skills learned from all the outcomes.
    15.Identify the sociocultural factors influencing intercultural communication as they relate to digital movie making.
    16.Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
  
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    DRMA 166 Digital Movie Making II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 166

    Prerequisite DRMA 165  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    This is an intermediate class in making movies using the digital format. Story telling, filming, editing, and presentation will be covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1.List and explain the requirements for a digital film script.
    2.Develop a schedule and storyboard for a digital film.
    3.Design a digital video workstation.
    4.Analyze and describe videotape formats.
    5.Design effective lighting for digital film.
    6.Demonstrate the use of appropriate set dressing for digital film.
    7.Demonstrate the use of special effects in digital films.
    8.Incorporate the use of effective sound techniques for digital film.
    9.Compare and contrast editing systems for digital film.
    10.Incorporate the use of effective editing techniques for content and story.
    11.Design effective color correction for image enhancement for digital film.
    12.Compare and contrast digital outputs based on purpose and media requirements.
    13.Produce a ten-minute digital video for an educational, social, or professional organization.
    14.Produce a thirty-minute digital video demonstrating skills learned from all the outcomes.
    15.Identify the sociocultural factors influencing intercultural communication as. they relate to digital movie
    making
    16.Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
  
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    DRMA 167 Digital Movie Making III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 167

    Prerequisite DRMA 166  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    This is an advanced class in making movies using the digital format. Story telling, filming, editing, and presentation will be covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1. List and explain the requirements for a digital film script
    2. Develop a schedule and storyboard for a digital film.
    3. Design a digital video workstation.
    4. Analyze and describe videotape formats.
    5. Design effective lighting for digital film.
    6. Demonstrate the use of appropriate set dressing for digital film.
    7. Demonstrate the use of special effects in digital films.
    8. Incorporate the use of effective sound techniques for digital film.
    9. Compare and contrast editing systems for digital film.
    10. Incorporate the use of effective editing techniques for content and story.
    11. Design effective color correction for image enhancement for digital film.
    12. Compare and contrast digital outputs based on purpose and media requirements
    13. Produce a fifteen-minute digital video for an educational, social, or professional organization.
    14. Produce a sixty-minute digital video demonstrating skills learned from all the outcomes.
    15. Identify the socio-cultural factors influencing intercultural communication as they relate to digital
    movie making.
    16. Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
  
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    DRMA 170 Technical Film and Theatre I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 170

    Course Description
    Introduction to behind-the-scenes activities of stagecraft/digital film: stage/digital film terminology, stage/digital film organization, tool familiarity, safety, and scenery construction.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Identify and describe production organization and management for stage and digital film.
    2.Identify and describe equipment for stage and digital film.
    3.Explain and employ safety standards for the stage/digital film.
    4.Demonstrate effective use of stage/digital film tools and materials.
    5.Illustrate scenic production techniques.
    6.Employ effective scene design and painting techniques.
    7.Acquire, build, and design a complete property plot for a theatrical/digital film production.
    8.Demonstrate effective use of sound design and sound production techniques.
    9.Execute effective digital film production techniques.
    10.Apply effective digital film post-production techniques.
    11.Identify the sociocultural factors influencing intercultural communication as they relate to design.
    12.Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
  
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    DRMA 171 Technical Film and Theatre II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 171

    Course Description
    An intermediate course in behind-the-scenes training for stage and digital film with emphasis on stage and digital film design.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Describe the design process.
    2.Research, recognize and evaluate theatre architecture.
    3.Research, recognize and evaluate style, composition, and design.
    4.Illustrate effective scenic production techniques for stage and digital film.
    5.Execute a scenic design for a theatrical/digital film production.
    6.Execute a perspective drawing for a theatrical/digital film production.
    7.Draft a set of construction drawings for a theatrical/digital film production.
    8.Execute a rendering for a theatrical/digital film production.
    9.Employ effective video production techniques.
    10.Employ effective digital video post-production techniques.
    11.Demonstrate safety for the stage and digital film and the use of the equipment.
    12.Identify the sociocultural factors influencing intercultural communication as they relate to design.
    13.Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
    14.Demonstrate the use of stage tools and materials.
  
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    DRMA 172 Technical Film and Theatre III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 172

    Course Description
    Behind-the-scenes training for stage and digital film with emphasis on stage and digital film design.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Execute a lighting design for a theatrical/digital film production.
    2.Apply standards for electrical theory and practice.
    3.Apply standards for lighting production practice for stage and digital film.
    4.Demonstrate effective projection techniques for stage and digital film.
    5.Research, recognize and evaluate color theory.
    6.Illustrate effective video production techniques.
    7.Employ effective digital video post-production techniques.
    8.Identify the sociocultural factors influencing intercultural communication as they relate to design.
    9.Demonstrate effective use of time/cost/space management.
    10.Explain and employ safety standards for the stage/digital film.
    11.Demonstrate effective use of stage tools and materials.
  
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    DRMA 260 Acting for Stage and Digital Film I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 260

    Course Description
    Introduction to the methods employed in acting for the contemporary stage and digital film.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Employ stage movement and pantomime consistently to express thoughts, feelings, and actions.
    2.Improvise a situation using emotional and sensory recall.
    3.Develop and practice effective voice and diction to express thoughts and feelings for stage and digital film.
    4.Define and give examples of theatrical and digital film conventions (time, setting, fourth wall, visual elements).
    5.Analyze a character from a script, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions.
    6.Portray believable characters when applying acting concepts, skills and techniques for stage and digital film.
    7.Describe and analyze the interdependence of all theatrical elements.
    8.Demonstrate safe use of the voice and body.
    9.Improvise, write, and perform monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey intended meaning to the audience for stage and digital film.
    10.Examine historical and cultural influences on theatre and analyze the roles of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in American Society.
    11.Use appropriate theatre vocabulary to apply the concepts of evaluation.
    12.Describe career and vocational opportunities in theatre and describe the training, skills, self-discipline and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.
  
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    DRMA 261 Acting for Stage and Digital Film II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 261

    Course Description
    Acting for the stage and digital film with emphasis on character development.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Develop and practice warm-up techniques.
    2.Analyze dramatic structure and genre for stage and film.
    3.Identify examples of theatrical conventions in theatre, film, television, and electronic media.
    4.Demonstrate safe use of the voice and body.
    5.Analyze characters from various genres and media, describing physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions.
    6.Create and sustain believable characters for stage and digital film.
    7.Improvise and write dialogue that reveals character and motivation for stage and digital film.
    8.Examine cultural, social, and political aspects of a script to depict appropriate technical elements.
    9.Analyze historical and cultural influences on theatre and film.
    10.Explain the influence of American society on live theatre and film.
    11.Evaluate emotional responses to and personal preferences for dramatic performances, using appropriate theatre and film vocabulary, and apply concepts of evaluation.
    12.Select career and vocational opportunities in theatre and film and explore the, training, skills, and artistic discipline needed to pursue them.
  
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    DRMA 262 Acting for Stage and Digital Film III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 262

    Course Description
    Acting for the stage and digital film with emphasis on styles of acting.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1.Develop and practice theatre preparation and warm-up techniques.
    2.Employ stage movement and pantomime consistently.
    3.Develop effective use of voice and diction.
    4.Compare the dramatic structure of theatre, film, television, and electronic media.
    5.Evaluate theatrical conventions of various cultural and historical periods.
    6.Evaluate the interdependence of all theatrical elements.
    7.Evaluate character dimensions in scripts of various genres and style.
    8.Create and sustain believable characters for stage and digital film.
    9.Outline and create imaginative scripts and scenarios that include motivated character, unique dialogue,
    conflict, and resolution for theatre, film, or television.
    10.Analyze and evaluate dramatic texts and direct brief scenes.
    11.Evaluate the role of live theatre, film, television, and electronic media in American society.
    12.Apply evaluation concepts to performances and compare and contrast literary and dramatic criticism
    of theatre, film, television, or electronic media.
    13.Demonstrate safe use of the voice and body.
    14.Describe career and vocational opportunities in theatre and film and explore the training, skills, and
    artistic discipline needed to pursue them.
  
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    DRMA 280 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 280A

    Course Description
    Provides students involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College Theatre/Film Production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
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    DRMA 281 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 281A

    Course Description
    Provides those involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College theatre/film production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
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    DRMA 282 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 282A

    Course Description
    Provides students involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College theatre/film production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
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    DRMA 283 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 283A

    Course Description
    Provides students involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College theatre/film production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
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    DRMA 284 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 284A

    Course Description
    Provides students involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College theatre/film production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
  •  

    DRMA 285 Production Practicum I - VI (1 to 3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 285A

    Course Description
    Provides students involved in the creative/performance aspect of a Pierce College theatre/film production with credit for their effort.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Collaborate with a creative team to implement a production schedule.
    2. Demonstrate practical application of expertise in specialized areas in order to stage a theatre/digital film production.
    3. Research, analyze, and apply the various concepts of theatre/digital film production as assigned by the director and technical director.
    4. Operate as a team member to dismantle the set and clean up after a final production.
    5. Evaluate the success of a theatre/digital film production.
    6. Demonstrate open-mindedness, curiosity, and respect for other countries, cultures, and genders.
    7. Complete tasks with the time, space, and budget allowed.
    8. Demonstrate effective listening skills.
    9. Coordinate with a work team to efficiently complete tasks assigned by a director or technical designer.
  
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    DRMA& 101 Introduction to the Theater Arts (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly THTR 150 - CNN

    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of theatre including dramatic literature, theatre history, scene design, stage lighting, styles of acting & directing, and plays discussions.

    Student Outcomes
    Course objectives: These course objectives reflect the campus wide outcomes endorsed by the college. The relevant outcomes are abbreviated as follows

    Student learning objectives:

    Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students should be able to:
    1. Critically analyze drama scripts
    2. Critically analyze the elements of theatre production
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of classical theatre as it relates to theatre today through critique and discussion
    4. Demonstrate an understanding of theatre history through critique, tests, and discussion
    5. Demonstrate an appreciation for the elements of theatre production
    6. Appraise live theatre productions
    7. Demonstrate an understanding of contemporary theatre through critique, tests, and discussion

Early Childhood Education

  
  •  

    ECED 102 Parent and Child (1 credit)



    Formerly ECE 140D

    Prerequisite Child is enrolled in campus Child Development Center and department permission.

    Course Description
    Parents of children enrolled in the Pierce Child Development Centers. Develop collaboration between staff and families. Supporting the understanding of individual child development through the use of diverse learning modalities. Grade: Pass/No Pass.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of children from infancy to age 5.
    2. Explore and evaluate developmentally appropriate environments and materials for young children.
    3. Use knowledge of children’s developmental stages to develop appropriate expectations and to respond to the needs of the child within the classroom and home environments.
    4. Discuss the educational significance of play as children’s work.
    5. Use appropriate methods of guidance and positive discipline through supportive interactions in the children’s classroom and in the home environment.
    6. Discuss and evaluate individual family issues and engage in processes which identify potential solutions.
    7. Access resources of benefit for individual family issues.
    8. Explore, evaluate and adapt the classroom and home environment relative to the health and safety of young children.
  
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    ECED 103 Parent and Child (1 credit)



    Formerly ECE 131

    Prerequisite Parent participates with child. Department permission.

    Course Description
    Participation of parents of children enrolled in Lab-School for the purpose of parent education in child growth and development. Include observation, lecture and discussion sessions and leadership development opportunities.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of the child ages 3-4-5.
    2. Identify and critique developmentally appropriate equipment for young children.
    3. Use knowledge of children’s behavior in a developmentally appropriate laboratory setting through demonstrating realistic behavior expectations and appropriate adult-child interactions.
    4. Discuss the educational significance of play for young children.
    5. Use appropriate methods of guidance and discipline through supportive interactions in the children’s classroom.
    6. Evaluate individual family issues and engage in processes which identify potential solutions.
    7. Identify and access resources of benefit for individual family issues.
    8. Explore, evaluate and adapt the classroom and home environment relative to the health and safety of young children.
  
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    ECED 104 Parent and Child (2 credits)



    Formerly ECE 141

    Prerequisite Parent participates with child. Department permission.

    Course Description
    Participation of parents with children 18-36 months of age in a child-study laboratory for the purpose of parent education in two year old growth and development. Course components include observation, lecture and discussion sessions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify a developmentally appropriate environment for young children.
    2. Select appropriate techniques based on knowledge of social development that assist children in sharing and playing with others.
    3. Identify influencing factors that lead to the development of aggression in young children.
    4. Provide children with positive alternatives to aggressive behavior that are based on current understanding of social development.
    5. Utilize language that enhances the development of self-esteem in young children.
    6. Apply congruent behavioral techniques based upon children’s individual temperament styles.
    7. Identify multiple intelligence learning styles in individual adults and children and choose corresponding teaching strategies.
    8. Apply current brain development and learning theories to young children’s activities.
    9. Identify differences in the stages of cognitive and moral development and provide learning experiences appropriate to the child’s level.
    10. Distinguish between cognitive, intellectual, and academic development and report how each relates to children’s higher level thinking skills.
    11. Select appropriate guidance techniques for different misbehavior types in applying discipline for the two-year-old child.
    12. Explore the impact on family dynamics which may occur during the two-year-old child’s stage of development, and plan activities to enhance the parent/child relationship.
  
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    ECED 109 Introduction to Math for Early Childhood Education (3 credits)



    Prerequisite MATH 050  with a grade of at least 2.0 or placement test score above MATH 050 or instructor’s permission.

    Course Description
    A course for early childhood educators focusing acquiring the math concepts needed to teach young children. Topics include patterns, sequencing, number systems and computation, geometry, measurement, and basic concepts from statistics and probability. Interactive, activity-based methods are used guided by national mathematics education standards. Emphasizes conceptual understanding, connections among topics, and communication of mathematical thinking.

    Student Outcomes
    Problem solving
    1. Apply problem-solving strategies to problem situations, such as the use of models, pattern recognition, working backwards, “guess, check, and revise”, and organized tables.

    Patterns and sequences
    2. Recognize and describe patterns, including those found in nature, sounds (music, rhythms), pictures, and objects. Create new patterns.
    3. Create sequences of objects or numbers, extend existing sequences, and order events in sequence.

    Number systems and operations
    4. Discuss the components of our base 10 number system and an ancient numeration system, including symbols used, place value, methods of computation, and advantages and disadvantages of the system.
    5. Describe and apply a variety of cognitive models and concrete materials (manipulatives) to explore, illustrate, and justify quantitative relationships and computational methods.
    6. Demonstrate proficiency with operations with Real numbers, including fractions, decimals, and percents, without a calculator.
    7. Apply properties of the real number system to justify reasoning and to solve problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, and percents.
    8. Use estimation to evaluate the reasonableness of solutions.
    9. Use correct order of operations to evaluate numerical expressions with several operations and parentheses.

    Relationships and two-dimensional representations
    10. Explore and analyze patterns, relationships, and functions, for example using “Guess my rule” games.
    11. Use two-dimensional graphs, such as coordinate geometry, to specify locations.

    Geometry and measurement
    12. Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes, using correct vocabulary.
    13. Build and manipulate representations of two- and three-dimensional objects using concrete models and drawings.
    14. Recognize measurable attributes of objects. Explore and apply various units and systems of measurement, including nonstandard, U.S., and metric (SI).
    15. Select and use appropriate measurement units, techniques, and tools to find length, perimeter, area, and volume.
    16. Determine area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine volume of rectangular solids.

    Statistics and probability
    17. Design simple investigations and collect and organize data.
    18. Display data in graphs and charts.
    19. Determine measures of center for sets of data (mean, median, mode).
    20. Calculate the empirical probabilities of events after collecting relevant data.
    21. Discuss the theoretical probability of simple events.

    Connections and Communication
    22. Connect mathematical ideas to the real world.
    23. Recognize how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole.
    24. Collaborate with classmates in order to achieve some of the learning outcomes of this course.
  
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    ECED 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Special Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introductory course in understanding educational services and supports available to children birth through third grade who have diverse abilities; and state and federal laws regarding special education.

  
  •  

    ECED 225 Math/Science for Children (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ECED& 105  with at least a 2.0 grad and concurrent enrollment in  MUSC 205  or ART 215 .

    Course Description
    A study of the cognitive development of young children and its application to mathematics and science conceptual development. Research, planning, and assessment of math and science curriculum and its application to the young child’s learning environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and articulate rationale for appropriate content areas in math and science based on child development theories; explain the scope and sequence of math and science instruction for children birth through third grade.
    2. Design and extend activities for children ages 0-8 that facilitate inquiry and problem-solving within specific science and math content areas that include multicultural perspectives and diversity in thought.
    3. Use resources identified to plan and implement short learning activities in math and science for toddlers, preschoolers, and primary aged children that include research questions/math prompts, concepts, activity objectives, and hands-on materials.
    4. Identify and apply curriculum to areas of content that involve ecological issues.
    5. Apply state and national curriculum standards to lesson plans for math and science; differentiate plans for children with ability differences.
    6. Identify assessment strategies for evaluating the cognitive growth of young children
    7. Plan and present a written thematic unit that integrates hands-on materials, concepts, questions, and activities.
    8. Articulate how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines are interrelated and are integral to supporting development across all disciplines and developmental domains.
  
  •  

    ECED 270 Planning and Assessment for Student Teaching (3 credits)



    Formerly ECED 210

    Prerequisite ECED& 105 , EDUC& 115 , ECED& 170 , ECED& 180 , ECED& 160 , EDUC& 130 , and ECED 225  with at least a  of 2.0 grade in each of these classes and department permission. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 275 .

    Course Description
    Education Capstone Course for curriculum development and evaluation of appropriate learned practices, learning materials, and experiences focused on the individual and group needs of diverse children within the Lab School setting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply knowledge of how children develop and learn to plan opportunities that support the physical, social, emotional, language, cognitive, creative, and aesthetic development of children ages 3-5.
    2. Develop and evaluate meaningful, integrated, and developmentally appropriate learning experiences in curriculum content areas based upon knowledge of individual children, the community, and curriculum goals and content (including language and literacy, mathematics, science, health, safety, nutrition, social studies, art, music, and movement).
    3. Plan and evaluate developmentally appropriate large group experiences in science, literature, and music that meet methods criteria for leadership, content, length, guidance, and transition.
    4. Construct and evaluate developmentally appropriate small group experiences that address observed needs of the group in the areas of fine arts, large motor skills, science, or other content areas.
    5. Observe, record, assess and interpret young children’s development and learning for the purpose of planning appropriate learning environments, learning experiences, human interactions, and adapting for individual differences.
    6. Create developmental portfolios for individual children based on observing, recording, assessing and interpreting young children’s development and learning.
    7. Establish and maintain positive, collaborative relationships with families through effective communication, family involvement, responsive interactions, and recognition of diverse family structures and social and cultural backgrounds.
    8. Plan and create environments and experiences that affirm and respect culturally and linguistically diverse children, support home-language preservation, and promote nondiscriminatory approaches and the valuing of diversity.
    9. Model practices of the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct.
  
  •  

    ECED 275 Early Childhood Student Teaching 6 credits



    Formerly ECED 220

    Prerequisite ECED& 105 , EDUC& 115 , ECED& 170 , ECED& 180 , ECED& 160 , EDUC& 130 , MUSC 205 , ART 215  and ECED 225  with minimum grades of 2.0 and department permission. Must be taken concurrently with ECED 270 .

    Course Description
    Designed for student participation in planning and implementing a developmentally appropriate classroom under supervision in the Pierce College nursery school laboratory facility. Includes experiences in lead teaching, team building, and application of curriculum with young children.

    Student Outcomes
    In alignment with NAEYC Competencies, students will:

    Apply child development principles to create developmentally effective materials and select equipment for children from birth through age 8 to explore, discover, and learn in context.
    Develop and sustain the habit of reflective and intentional practice.
     Engage in continuous, collaborative, and intercultural learning to inform professional practice.
    Develop a professional identity in order to engage in professional communication, advocate for children, and ethically participate as members of the early childhood profession.
    Implement and evaluate meaningful, developmentally effective, and integrated learning experiences in all academic content areas.
    Apply developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate teaching and guidance practices that are responsive to learning trajectory of young children and to the needs of each child.
    Communicate and build relationships with families and communities that are respectful, inclusive, and reflect cultural humility.
  
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    ECED 307 Health and Fitness (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Plan for comprehensive health and fitness education in early learning programs serving children birth to grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families, including the dimension of wellness such as physical, emotional, and social well-being.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the effect of health and fitness choices and habits on quality of life.
    2. Adapt health and fitness curriculum to individual student needs such as developmentally appropriate motor skills.
    3. Plan for health and fitness instruction in various settings such as classroom, gymnasium, and playground.
    4. Utilize resources to plan health and fitness lessons in compliance with state learning standards.
    5. Develop a comprehensive, culturally-relevant, health and fitness education program that incorporates the principles of safety, legal issues, and risk management.
  
  •  

    ECED 325 Advanced Math Methods (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Develop a deep understanding of the development of spatial and mathematical learning across all strands: number & operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data analysis & probability. There will be an emphasis on the content included in the state early learning guidelines and standards for children birth through grade three and their families who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Critique classroom discourse and define the role of the teacher in facilitating that discourse through findings from research on student learning.

    2. Utilize problem solving skills in the mathematical content areas of numbers and operations, geometry, algebra, data analysis and probability, and measurement appropriate for adaptation for children from birth through grade three.

    3. Plan a problem-based mathematics lesson that includes elements of differentiation, assessment, and technology, and requires students to engage in sense making and mathematical communication while adhering to state and national standards.

    4. Develop assessments that give a teacher insight into student thinking about mathematics content and create plans to implement adjustments from the results.

    5. Research ideas for teaching mathematics in diverse classrooms to incorporate into lesson planning.

    6. Develop knowledge, skills, and professional behaviors across early learning settings, examine the nature of mathematics, how mathematics should be taught, and how students learn mathematics.

    7. Observe and analyze a range of approaches to mathematics teaching and learning focusing on tasks, discourse, environment, and assessment.
  
  •  

    ECED 335 Law and Ethics (3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    An overview of current laws concerning special education in particular, and education in general. Professional ethics and advocacy will also be addressed as it relates to early learning programs and working with families and their children birth through grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the federal and state legislation that affects children, families, and programs for young children with disabilities.

    2. Know, use and comply with the Washington Administrative Codes (WACs) as they apply to the design and implementation of early intervention, special education and related services

    3. Explain the documentation, development, implementation, and monitoring of comprehensive Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP), Individualized Education Program (IEP), and 504 plans as they are constructed based on Federal Law in collaboration with team members and families.

    4. Apply the laws, policies/regulations, and ethical principles regarding positive behavior management in the construction of disciplinary planning and aversive intervention for infants and young children.

    5. Describe and differentiate the legal, judicial, health, and educational systems that assist families with infants and young children who are ability diverse, in order to advocate for, and refer children appropriately.

    6. Discuss the advocacy provided through professional organizations and publications that support infants and young children with disabilities, their families, and colleagues

    7. Define and discuss the characteristics that comprise high standards of competence and integrity in order to exercise sound judgment in practices consistent with the Council for Exceptional Children Code of Ethics.

    8. Discuss the warning signs and potential impacts of abuse upon children including: physical, sexual, psychological, neglect, and substance abuse; and describe the state regulations regarding protection of children and reporting of abuse.
  
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    ECED 340 Assessment and Evaluation (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Select, administer, score, and interpret formal assessment tools. Evaluate students for placement into special education programs. Develop Individual Education Plans (IEPs), Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs), and 504 plans for children birth to third grade who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and discuss various types of assessments and the legal and ethical principles that apply to the steps in the assessment process.

    2. Identify and discuss reliable and valid assessment methods and developmentally appropriate responses of infants and young children.

    3. Explain the evaluation related to child-find screening, pre-referral, response to intervention (RTI), referral, eligibility procedures, extended school year and transition procedures.

    4. Select and use a variety of formal assessments to inform decisions regarding appropriate placement and services to infants and young children with disabilities, and students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

    5. Explain concepts of measurement, reliability and validity.

    6. Correctly administer, score and interpret data from formal assessments in order to collaboratively construct Individual Educational Programs (IEP), Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP), and 504 plans for children with disabilities.

    7. Communicate and integrate assessment and ongoing evaluation results from others in eligibility decisions and the development and implementation of the IEP, IFSP, and 504 plan while implementing best practices.

    8. Utilize ongoing evaluation/assessment data to determine the effectiveness of specially designed instruction and related services for infants and young children.
  
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    ECED 355 Social and Political Context of Early Childhood Education (3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Students will explore diversity and social justice issues influencing educational settings. Students will examine in depth the historical and current impact of children’s, teachers’, and families’ cultural, social and political context in schools.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and apply key terms and concepts of diversity, inclusion and social justice.
    2. Analyze how implicit bias can influence relationships and identity development.
    3. Analyze how systemic power, privilege, and oppression impacts early childhood education systems and the individuals within those systems.
    4. Summarize how professional teaching practice is influenced by personal, social, and cultural contexts.
    5. Deconstruct biases, stereotypes, and microaggressions present in early childhood educational settings and the larger community.
    6. Critique how an individual’s family structure, culture, social, emotional, and political contexts may impact learning and participating.
    7. Evaluate early learning programs by applying the NAEYC Position Statement on Diversity.
  
  •  

    ECED 365 Observations, Documentation and Monitoring (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Develop skills and strategies for observing, documenting, and monitoring children birth to grade 3 who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families. Strategies for tracking progress towards meeting Individual Education Plan (IEP) and Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) goals will also be addressed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and use various developmentally and culturally appropriate practices to observe, record, and assess young children’s development and learning.

    2. Evaluate various progress monitoring tools and formative and summative assessment strategies for the purpose of setting goals and planning appropriate programs, environments, and interactions, and adapting for individual differences.

    3. Evaluate and use standardized assessment tools, and integrate standardized data with other assessment data in order to make informed decisions about adaptations and modifications to instruction.

    4. Articulate strategies on how to engage children in developmentally appropriate self-assessment and goal setting.

    5. Evaluate the processes of involving families in the assessment process and communicate assessment information with families.

    6. Integrate assessment results from the student support team as an active participant in the development and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEP), Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP), and 504 plans for children with special developmental and learning needs.
  
  •  

    ECED 370 Adaptations, Modifications and Planning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Use evidence based strategies to adapt and modify curriculum and environments for individual children birth to grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families. Create lesson plans for children based on Individual Education Plans (IEP), Individual Family Services Plans (IFSP) goals, and 504 plans.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Select, adapt and modify individualized assessment strategies including accommodations, technology and alternative assessment for infants and young children.

    2. Develop, implement, and monitor comprehensive, IFSP/IEPs, and 504 plans in collaboration with team members, families, and as appropriate, infants and young children.

    3. Develop and select instructional content, resources, and strategies that are aligned with the IEP or IFSP goals and respond to cultural and linguistic differences.

    4. Utilize and adapt instructional strategies and materials according to characteristics of infants and young children including social, emotional, adaptive, cognitive, academic and behavioral needs.

    5. Prepare lesson plans, organize materials, and monitor implementation of early intervention services and specially designed instruction for oneself, Para educators, and general educators.

    6. Use research-based strategies and interventions to facilitate inclusion within a continuum of service including appropriate accommodations, curriculum modifications, and alternatives.

    7. Use technology to implement progress monitoring and use data to develop and modify instructional plans.

    8. Evaluate the need for assistive technologies and incorporate when appropriate in order to ensure all students are included in the classroom community.
 

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