2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Aug 08, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 385 Advanced Language and Literacy Methods (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Refine teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development for children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse at each developmental stage (birth-third grade) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading. There will be an emphasis on strategies for teaching reading and how to support each stage of literacy development across genres and purposes. Strategies for supporting families as they assist their children in learning language and literacy will also be addressed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the developmental progression of language, communication, and literacy skills in children from birth through grade three.

    2. Analyze and apply various theories and techniques of language and literacy learning and instruction for young children, which encompass cross-cultural and individual needs.

    3. Assess literacy curriculum and plan lessons to support the literacy development of children from birth through grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.

    4. Assess early learning environments for the presence of materials and practices that support language and literacy development.

    5. Identify or develop formative and summative assessments for children’s language and literacy skills.

    6. Articulate how media and technology influence young children’s language and literacy development and choose developmentally appropriate technological tools for use when working with children.

    7. Create activities that families can use at home to support their children’s language and literacy development.

    8. Incorporate the major components of reading and writing in creating lesson plans to support children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.

    9. Identify achievement gaps in local schools, articulate factors that may contribute to them, and develop strategies to address them.
  
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    ECED 395 Collaboration and Supervision (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    Develop skills needed to effectively collaborate with others including school personnel, community agency personnel, and families to support children birth to third grade who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families. Supervision of assistants and paraprofessionals will also be addressed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Plan collaborative strategies to use with local, community, state and federal personnel in order to provide support and services to infants and young children with disabilities.

    2. Create and utilize a plan for communication with school personnel, families and community members regarding the characteristics and needs of infants and young children with disabilities and how to provide accommodation and inclusion.

    3. Identify and define the roles and responsibilities of family members and school personnel as they collaborate to meet the needs and plan programming for the child with diverse abilities.

    4.Collaborate in the assessment of infants and young children’s cognitive, social-emotional, behavioral, sensory, motor, communication, and adaptive domains in order to create a safe, equitable, positive, and supportive learning environment for infants and young children.

    5. Use collaborative strategies with families and other community agencies to facilitate all transitions for infants and young children with disabilities:
    *early intervention to preschool;
    *preschool to elementary;
    *individualized alternative settings to school;
    *extended school year;
    *to and from general education

    6. Describe and analyze strategies for appropriate program and instructional supervision and training including management of classroom volunteers, para educators, and peer tutors in order to meet student needs.
  
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    ECED 485 Residency Seminar (3 to 9 credits)



    Prerequisite Concurrent enrollment in ECED 497  or ECED 498 .

    Course Description
    Students in this course will reflect on their residency experience in an early childhood school setting with children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate teaching practices to make appropriate changes that more effectively serve families and children birth through grade three.
    2. Prepare and submit all required documents and materials for the edTPA.
    3. Research P-3 jobs and prepare appropriate materials to successfully obtain a teaching position.
    4. Describe community and school resources and methods for referral, both internal and external to your placement, that support students’ learning and well-being.
    5. Improve practice through the use of appropriate professional literature, organizations, resources, and experiences.
    6. Use the results of assessments and evaluation to create a Professional Growth and Development Plan for the first year of teaching.
    7. Describe the legal and ethical obligation to report suspected abuse and neglect and research schools’ policies and procedures on mandated reporting.
    8. Identify current issues and trends within the field of early childhood special education and the theoretical perspectives behind them.
    9. Identify evidence-based classroom practices that support children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.
    10. Evaluate possible solutions to critical issues within the student teaching experience
    11. Analyze teaching practices and experience through classroom discussions, readings, and reflection.
    12. Reflect on current classroom events in order to advocate for self, children, families, and colleagues with regard to equity, diversity, and inclusion.
    13. Create and implement a self-care plan.
  
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    ECED 491 Residency Extension (6 credits)



    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    In this course, students will demonstrate all PESB competencies required for the endorsement they are seeking.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Design and implement developmentally appropriate learning experiences that integrate within and across disciplines, and use effective instructional strategies.
    2. Plan and implement lessons using research-based strategies and the essential concepts of content areas including English language arts, health and fitness, mathematics, science, social studies, and the arts.
    3. Utilize reliable assessment methods and developmentally appropriate responses of infants and young children to document progress and determine services and supports.
  
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    ECED 497 General Education Residency (6 to 18 credits)



    Prerequisite Concurrent enrollment with ECED 485 .

    Course Description
    Experience working in a general education setting, with children birth through grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families under the supervision of a certificated teacher.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create positive, equitable learning environments and experiences that reflect and respect culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse children and support home language preservation.
    2. Build reciprocal relationships with families, colleagues, and community to support children’s learning and development.
    3. Develop nurturing relationships with children to support their development and learning.
    4. Uphold the professional code of ethical conduct and applicable laws, including Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and mandated reporting during residency.
    5. Select and implement behavioral support and management strategies that are research-based, individualized to the child’s and/or group’s needs, and least intrusive.
    6. Teach children the social skills necessary for success in their immediate environments.
    7. Promote children’s cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, creative and physical development by organizing and orchestrating the environment in ways that best facilitate the development and learning of the whole child.
    8. Collaborate with other educational professionals to accomplish school, district, and state educational goals.
    9. Design and implement developmentally appropriate learning experiences that integrate within and across disciplines, and use effective instructional strategies.
    10. Utilize appropriate professional resources to learn about exceptionalities in infants and young children, as well as special family/learning needs in order to implement appropriate instructional strategies.
    11. Plan and implement lessons using research-based strategies and the essential concepts of content areas including English language arts, health and fitness, mathematics, science, social studies, and the arts.
    12. Integrate learning opportunities in daily routines and planned activities.
    13. Utilize reliable assessment methods and developmentally appropriate responses of infants and young children to document progress and determine services and supports.
    14. Demonstrate skills needed to work collaboratively with the student/family support team to assess children’s progress, design and implement the intervention, and report results.
    15. Establish and maintain positive, collaborative relationships with colleagues, other professionals, and families, and work effectively as a member of a professional team.
    16. Demonstrate professionalism in a school setting.
    17. Implement and monitor Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs), Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), 504 plans, and lesson plans which align with general curriculum including state learning standards and early childhood learning guidelines.
    18. Analyze student data to inform practice.
    19. Plan and implement the Since Time Immemorial Curriculum.
  
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    ECED 498 Special Education Residency (6 to 18 credits)



    Prerequisite Concurrently enrolled in ECED 485 .

    Course Description
    Experience working in an early childhood special education setting, with children birth through grade three who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and their families under the supervision of a certificated teacher. Students will be concurrently enrolled in a reflective seminar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply the concepts of how individuals grow, develop, and learn to provide learning opportunities that support the cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, creative, and physical development of all children from birth through grade three.
    2. Create positive, equitable learning environments and experiences that reflect and respect culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse children and support home language preservation.
    3. Develop nurturing relationships with children to support their development and learning.
    4. Uphold the professional code of ethical conduct and applicable laws, including Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and mandated reporting during residency.
    5. Establish and maintain positive, collaborative relationships with colleagues, other professionals, and families, and work effectively as a member of a professional team.
    6. Select and implement behavioral support and management strategies that are research-based, individualized to the child’s and/or group’s needs, and least intrusive.
    7. Collaborate with other educational professionals to accomplish school, district, and state educational goals.
    8. Design, implement, and adapt developmentally appropriate learning experiences that integrate within and across disciplines, and use effective instructional strategies.
    9. Implement appropriate instructional strategies as found in district adopted curriculum and make modifications as needed.
    10. Plan, implement, adapt lessons using research-based strategies and the essential concepts of content areas including English language arts, health and fitness, mathematics, science, social studies, and the arts.
    11. Utilize reliable assessment methods and developmentally appropriate responses of infants and young children to document progress and determine services and supports.
    12. Collaboratively with the student/family support team to assess children’s progress, design and implement interventions, and report results.
    13. Utilize advocacy strategies to address issues of equity, diversity, and inclusion.
    14. Demonstrate professionalism in a school setting.
    15. Participate on teams to screen, evaluate and determine eligibility of children referred for special education services.
    16. Use response to intervention (RTI) or multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS) with children assigned to the mini-professional learning community .
    17. Determine appropriateness of various instruments and procedures for assessing infants and young children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse and make recommendations for implementation.
    18. Develop, implement, and monitor Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs), Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), 504 plans, and lesson plans which align with general curriculum including state learning standards and early childhood learning guidelines.
    19. Analyze student data to inform practice.
  
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    ECED& 105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ECE 111

    Course Description
    Explore the foundations of early childhood education. Examine theories defining the field, issues and trends, best practices, and program models. Observe children, professionals, and programs in action.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain current theories and ongoing research in early care and education
    2. Describe the role of play in early childhood programs.
    3. Compare early learning program models.
    4. Explain the importance of developing culturally responsive partnerships with families.
    5. Identify appropriate guidance techniques used in early care and education settings.
    6. Describe the observation, assessment, and teaching cycle used to plan curriculum for all young children.
    7. Apply the professional code of ethics for early care and education to resolve dilemmas.
    8. Describe major historical figures, advocates, and events shaping today’s early childhood education.
    9. Observe an early childhood environment and identify examples of best practice.
  
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    ECED& 107 Health, Safety and Nutrition (5 credits)



    Formerly ECE 240

    Course Description
    Develop knowledge and skills to ensure good health, nutrition, and safety of children in group care and education programs. Recognize the signs of abuse and neglect, responsibilities for mandated reporting, and available community resources.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe federal and state mandated health, safety, and nutrition practices.
    2. Identify indicators of illnesses/ infectious diseases and steps to prevent the spread of them.
    3. Outline safety procedures for providing emergency care and daily care.
    4. Evaluate program safety policies.
    5. Describe food programs and practices that support the development of children.
    6. Create examples of developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive health, safety, and nutrition education materials and activities.
    7. Describe the responsibilities of mandated reporters.
    8. Develop strategies for working with culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse families in accessing health, nutritional, and dental services.
    9. Assess personal history and characteristics relative to the teaching profession in order to identify areas of self-care to address which may contribute to increased personal health.
  
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    ECED& 120 Practicum: Focus on Relationships (2 credits)



    Formerly ECE 222

    Prerequisite ECED& 105  with a 2.0 or higher or concurrent enrollment.

    Course Description
    In an early learning setting apply best practice for engaging in nurturing relationships with children. Focus on keeping children healthy and safe while promoting growth and development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the characteristics of nurturing relationships built between teachers and children.
    2. Practice ideals of professionalism in work with children, families and peers.
    3. Recognize cultural responsiveness when observing professionals and programs.
    4. Identify practices that promote health, safety, growth and development of children.
  
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    ECED& 132 Infants and Toddlers (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Examine the unique developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Study the role of the caregiver, relationships with families, developmentally appropriate practices, nurturing environments for infants and toddlers, and culturally relevant care.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss developmental milestones from birth to 36 months articulating the influences of individual development, temperament and cultural norms in the context of important, ongoing relationships.
    2. Design a plan to support reciprocal, culturally sensitive partnerships with families.
    3. Select positive guidance techniques that are appropriate and effective with infants and toddlers.
    4. Critique infant and toddler early learning environments, articulating environmental influences on the learning processes of infants and toddlers during authentic play activities.
    5. Describe a plan for developmentally appropriate, culturally relevant curriculum that supports language, physical, cognitive, creative, social, and emotional development.
  
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    ECED& 134 Family Child Care (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Learn the basics of home/family child care program management. Topics include: licensing requirements; business management; relationship building; health, safety, & nutrition; guiding behavior and; promoting growth & development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe strategies for complying with Family Childcare Minimum Licensing Requirements.
    2. Describe strategies for meeting the developmental needs and guiding the behavior of all children in multi-age groups.
    3. Identify strategies for family child care business management including tax planning and record-keeping.
    4. Create written documents, such as a contract and policy handbook, that facilitate communication between the provider and the families.
    5. Develop strategies for creating reciprocal, culturally responsive relationships with families.
    6. Articulate knowledge and skills that define Family Childcare Providers as professionals.
  
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    ECED& 138 Home Visitor/Family Engagement (3 credits)



    Formerly ECED 138

    Course Description
    Plan and provide home visits and group activities that promote secure parent-child relationships and support families to provide high-quality early learning experiences that are embedded in everyday routines and experiences.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe developmental milestones from birth to 36 months articulating the influences of individual development, temperament and cultural norms.
    2. Articulate a plan that creates reciprocal, culturally sensitive partnerships with families.
    3. Develop an outline for effective home visits that includes awareness of family and home visitor safety.
    4. Create a plan for effective communication with families to develop shared goals and understanding of school readiness skills.
    5. Define Reflective Practice and identify how it might be implemented.
    6. Construct a curriculum to be delivered in a home visiting or group socialization model, checking for developmentally, linguistically, and culturally appropriateness.
  
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    ECED& 139 Administration of Early Learning (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Develop administrative skills required to develop, open, operate, manage, and assess early childhood education and care programs. Explore techniques and resources available for Washington State licensing and NAEYC standard compliance.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Crosswalk program policies and practices with licensing and professional standards.
    2. Create a plan for appropriate staff, food, equipment, materials and programming for specific age groups and settings.
    3. Prepare a balanced budget.
    4. Identify methods for recruiting, hiring, evaluating, supervising, and supporting culturally and linguistically reflective staff.
    5. Describe a variety of strategies for building relationships with all families.
    6. Review tools used to evaluate program effectiveness and identify areas for improvements.
    7. Apply the NAEYC Code of Ethics in resolving an administrative dilemma (case study).
  
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    ECED& 160 Curriculum Development (5 credits)



    Formerly ECE 213

    Course Description
    Investigate learning theory, program planning, and tools for curriculum development promoting language, fine/gross motor, social-emotional, cognitive and creative skills and growth in young children (birth-age 8).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain major early childhood curriculum theories and current trends in curriculum design for early learning environments.
    2. Apply principles of developmentally, individually and culturally appropriate practice when designing, implementing and evaluating curriculum.
    3. Evaluate integrated learning experiences supportive of children’s development and learning incorporating national, state and local standards.
    4. Design curriculum that supports children’s language/communication, cognitive, social/emotional, fine/gross motor and creative development.
    5. Design curriculum that is inclusive and represents the diversity of children and families.
    6. Plan developmentally appropriate activities and schedules, which promote all children’s growth and learning.
    7. Observe, document and assess individual and group needs, interests and skills for the purpose of curriculum planning and on-going modifications of plans.
  
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    ECED& 170 Environments for Young Children (3 credits)



    Formerly ECE 112

    Course Description
    Design, evaluate, and improve indoor and outdoor environments which ensure quality learning, nurturing experiences, and optimize the development of young children.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Design healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging indoor and outdoor learning environments for children.
    2. Identify strategies to achieve compliance with Washington Administrative Code and other state or federal regulations.
    3. Create environments that promote growth in all developmental domains and academic disciplines.
    4. Establish environments, routines, and schedules that promote children’s age-appropriate, self-regulated behaviors.
    5. Establish environments that promote the cultural diversity of children, families, and their communities.
    6. Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of early learning environments serving differing age groups (ex. infant, toddler, school age).
  
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    ECED& 180 Language and Literacy Development (3 credits)



    Formerly ECE 213

    Course Description
    Develop teaching strategies for language acquisition and literacy skill development at each developmental stage (birth-age 8) through the four interrelated areas of speaking, listening, writing, and reading.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the continuum of language acquisition and early literacy skills.
    2. Develop evidence-based, appropriate environments and opportunities that support children’s emergent language and literacy skills.
    3. Describe strategies for responding to children who are culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse.
    4. Develop ways to facilitate family and child interactions as primary contexts for heritage language and English development.
    5. Analyze images of culture and individual abilities reflected in children’s literature and other learning materials.
    6. Utilize developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive assessment practices for documenting the growth of language and literacy skills.
  
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    ECED& 190 Observation and Assessment (3 credits)



    Formerly ECE 224

    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or higher or concurrent enrollment in EDUC& 115 .

    Course Description
    Collect and record observation of and assessment data on young children in order to plan for and support the child, the family, the group and the community. Practice reflection techniques, summarizing conclusions and communicating findings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe reasons for collecting observation and assessment data.
    2. Identify indicators of growth, development, learning and social behaviors in all children.
    3. Identify techniques for avoiding bias, judgments, and assumptions in observations.
    4. Collect factual, descriptive data using a variety of assessment tools and strategies.
    5. Document and analyze assessment data for use in planning curriculum for individual and groups of children.

Economics

  
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    ECON 110 Survey of Economics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Overview of micro and macroeconomics covering supply, demand, prices, production, market structures, role of government, overall economy, unemployment, inflation, taxes, government spending, money and interest rates.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the goals of an economic system and the advantages and disadvantages of the market system..
    2. Graph and explain supply and demand.
    3. Explain what factors influence demand and supply and how they impact price and quantity.
    4. Describe the differences in characteristics between a competitive market structure and a non-competitive market structure.
    5. Describe the role of government in dealing with imperfections in the market system, including public goods and externalities.
    6. Describe and calculate GDP.
    7. Describe a recession and the business cycle and describe and calculate the unemployment rate.
    8. Explain fiscal policy and how it can be used to change GDP, unemployment, and inflation.
    9. Define a budget deficit, explain what causes a budget deficit, and describe the long run costs.
    10. Explain monetary policy and how the Federal Reserve controls the money supply and interest rates in order to influence GDP, unemployment, and inflation.
  
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    ECON& 201 Microeconomics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ECON 212 - CCN

    Course Description
    The study of individual markets, looking at efficiency of the market system, scarcity, resources, supply and demand, price and output determination, the role of government in a market economy, international trade, and the distribution of income.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the goals of an economic system and the advantages and disadvantages of the market system.
    2. Explain scarcity as the foundation of economics, making use of the production possibilities curve framework.
    3. Explain the importance of specialization and international trade using the concept of comparative advantage.
    4. Use the supply and demand framework to explain how the competitive market system can allocate resources efficiently.
    5. Compute elasticities and use them in analyzing the impact of a price change.
    6. Calculate and graph costs in relationship to changes in the scale of production.
    7. Describe and compare the characteristics and implications of competitive versus non-competitive market structures.
    8. Describe the role of government in dealing with imperfections in the market system, including public goods and externalities.
    9. Explain what has happened to the distribution of income and describe the reasons for the trends.
  
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    ECON& 202 Macroeconomics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ECON 213 - CCN

    Course Description
    The study of how the overall economy operates. Topics include unemployment, inflation, GDP, the business cycle, long run growth, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and international trade.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the goals of an economic system and the advantages and disadvantages of the market system.
    2. Calculate and explain major macroeconomic measures, including nominal GDP, real GDP, price indices, and unemployment.
    3. Use the aggregate demand and aggregate supply framework to explain the business cycle and long run growth.
    4. Calculate and explain economic changes using macroeconomic multipliers.
    5. Explain fiscal policy and how it can be used to influence GDP, unemployment, and inflation.
    6. Explain the causes of budget deficits and describe the long run costs.
    7. Define money and the Federal Reserve’s control over the money supply and interest rates to influence GDP, unemployment, and inflation.
    8. Describe long run growth and the factors that influence the growth rate.
    9. Analyze the impact of globalization on domestic and international economies.

Education

  
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    EDUC 223 Practicum: Focus on Special Education (2 credits)



    Formerly ECED 223

    Prerequisite Completion of EDUC& 203 , ECED 200 , EDUC& 204  with grade of 2.0 or better or concurrent enrollment.

    Course Description
    Designed for students to observe and participate under qualified supervision in programs for young children throughout the community with a focus on special education.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate appropriate practices that ensure and maintain the health, safety, and nutrition of children.

    2. Establish supportive relationships with children; guide them as individuals and as part of a group.

    3. Serve children and families in a professional manner.

    4. Demonstrate cultural competence and responsiveness within and across cultures and provide an inclusive, welcoming, and respectful environment where all children, youth, and families can take pride in their cultural identities, beliefs, and practices.

    5. Perform duties of the assigned role as outlined in expectations by the site supervisor.

    6. Collaborate at regular intervals with the site supervisor to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties or change responsibilities.

    7. Compare and contrast inclusive and self-contained programs / classrooms for young children based on a primary classroom assignment and required secondary site visit.

    8. Compare and contrast strength based and deficit based approaches to educational planning and curriculum development.

    9. Create curriculum to meet children’s educational goals.
  
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    EDUC& 101 Paraeducator Basics (3 credits)



    Course Description
    An introduction to roles and responsibilities of the Paraeducator in the K-12 educational system. Students will explore techniques supporting instruction, professional and ethical practices, positive and safe learning environments, effective communication and teamwork.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare the distinct roles and responsibilities of the Paraeducator with those of the certificated staff.
    2. Identify the signs of a safe, positive, and culturally inclusive learning environment.
    3. Utilize effective communication techniques and strategies to be used with students, family members, and staff.
    4. Examine positions of power, privilege, and inequity.
    5. Utilize the Washington State Paraeducator Standards to develop a professional development plan.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to utilize assessments and record data to monitor child growth and development.
    7. Compare and contrast the various paraeducator roles and responsibilities across jobs and settings.
  
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    EDUC& 115 Child Development (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Build a functional understanding of the foundation of child development, prenatal to early adolescence. Observe and document physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children, reflective of cross cultural and global perspectives.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss prominent child development research and theories guiding parenting and care giver’s practices.
    2. Describe the developmental sequence from conception through early adolescence in all domains.
    3. Analyze critical stages of brain development as influencers of child development.
    4. Examine techniques to conduct and document observations of children as a means to assess and communicate growth and development.
    5. Explain individual differences in development.
    6. Identify how family, caregivers, teachers, community, culture, and trauma influence development.
    7. Outline community resources to support children’s and families’ development.
  
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    EDUC& 130 Guiding Behavior (3 credits)



    Formerly ECE 112

    Course Description
    Examine the principles and theories promoting social competence in young children and creating safe learning environments. Develop skills promoting effective interactions, providing positive individual guidance, and enhancing group experiences.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify developmentally appropriate individual and group behaviors of children.
    2. Compare at least three approaches to guiding behavior.
    3. Recognize positive, respectful, culturally responsive approaches to guidance.
    4. Plan environment supportive of children’s development with focus on attachment, self-help, relationships, and executive function.
    5. Articulate strategies to promote social/emotional competence and positive sense of self.
    6. Reflect on personal bias and attitudes regarding children’s behavior and disciplinary styles in order to create a philosophy of guidance and discipline that is appropriate for use in an early childhood education classroom.
  
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    EDUC& 136 School Age Care (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Develop skills to provide developmentally appropriate and culturally relevant activities and care, specifically: preparing the environment, implementing curriculum, building relationships, guiding academic /social skill development, and community outreach.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the physical, cognitive, social and emotional stages of children ages 5-12.
    2. Develop a plan to create reciprocal and culturally sensitive relationships with children and families.
    3. Analyze the effectiveness of an environment and recommend changes that are culturally retentive, developmentally appropriate, and conducive to positive social interactions.
    4. Identify guidance strategies that promote cognitive and social growth in the context of school age care environment.
    5. Describe state and local school age care regulations and procedures related to group size, health, nutrition and safety.
    6. Describe strategies supporting curriculum that is developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive.
    7. Identify community resources supporting school age care/youth development program personnel.
  
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    EDUC& 150 Child, Family, and Community (3 credits)



    Formerly ECE 230

    Course Description
    Integrate the family and community contexts of young children. Explore cultures and demographics of families in society, community resources, strategies for involving families in the education of their child, and tools for effective communication.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate and describe the cultural influences, social issues, changes and transitions that affect children, families, schools and communities.
    2. Examine the concept of family, school, peers, media and community as socialization agents.
    3. Analyze strategies that empower families to establish and maintain collaborative relationships to support the growth and development of children.
    4. Identify how one’s own family history and life experiences may impact relationships with children and families.
    5. Identify community services and agencies that support the needs of children and families and establish resource and referral systems for parents and educators.
  
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    EDUC& 191 Field Experience I – Cooperative Work Experience (3 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    In a pre-K-12 setting, work alongside a teacher/paraeducator, observing and demonstration best practices. In seminar and reflection link experiences with WA State Paraeducator Basic Competencies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assist in providing instruction which meets the needs of diverse learners.
    2. Demonstrate practice reflective of district policy, state laws, and professional code of ethics.
    3. Foster and support culturally responsive, inclusive learning environments for each and every student.
    4. Demonstrate effective communication skills with students, families and staff.
  
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    EDUC& 202 Introduction to Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly EDUC 201 - CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of history, philosophy, principles, issues, and trends in American Education. Includes opportunities for observations of educational models and exploration of career paths.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the history, philosophy and principles of the American education system.
    2. Discuss current issues, trends, and career opportunities.
    3. Describe current principles of behavior guidance and their influence on learning.
    4. Compare and contrast developmentally appropriate instruction and assessment strategies.
    5. Recognize the need to differentiate curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse students.
    6. Explain how teaching and learning are influenced by individual experiences, abilities, and prior learning.
    7. Describe the impact of America’s changing demographics and the implications for the classroom.
    8. Define the role of the educator in the program setting and describe the nature of relationships among children, parents, educators and educational programs.
  
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    EDUC& 204 Introduction to Inclusive Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Introductory course in recognition and identification of exceptionality in children from birth through high school (21). Includes policies and regulations concerning state and federal provisions of special education and related services, as well as adaptations for serving special needs students in general education classrooms.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the history, policies, current issues, and competencies that guide special education in the State of Washington.
    2. Recognize core concepts and values that are essential to special education including confidentiality, person-first language, family-centered and culturally responsive practice, natural environments, inclusion, and Least Restrictive Environments.
    3. Identify the milestones of human development and risk factors that may impact development.
    4. Explain the IFSP/IEP/504 /Transition Plan sequence as carried out in the general education setting.
    5. Describe evidence-based techniques and adaptations for supporting culturally, linguistically, and ability diverse children and their families.
    6. Evaluate personal qualities including bias, stereotyping, empathy, and professional ethics in regard to working with families of children with disabilities.
  
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    EDUC& 240 Diversity in Education (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students will explore diversity and social justice issues influencing educational settings. Students will examine in depth the historical and current impact of children’s, teachers’, and families’ cultural, social and political context in schools.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and apply key terms and concepts of diversity, inclusion, and social justice
    2. Explain how implicit bias can influence relationships and identity development
    3. Identify how systemic power, privilege, and oppression impacts education systems and the individuals within those systems
    4. Describe how professional teaching practice is influenced by personal, social, and cultural contexts
    5. Deconstruct biases, stereotypes, and microaggressions present in the school setting
    6. Articulate how an individual’s family structure, culture, social, emotional, and political contexts may impact learning
  
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    EDUC& 291 Field Experience II - Cooperative Work Experience (2 to 3 credits)



    Course Description
    In pre-K-12 setting, work alongside teacher/paraeducator, observing and demonstration best practices. In seminar and reflection link experiences with WA State Paraeducator Competencies for ELL and Special Education.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Engage with staff to build a culturally and linguistically inclusive learning environment for each and every child.
    2. Demonstrate standards of conduct consistent with all laws, regulation, policies, and procedures pertinent to paraeducators.
    3. Assist in supporting each and every student by using appropriate learning and behavior strategies.
    4. Use culturally responsive communication skills with students, families, and staff.
    5. Recognize and support the role of the classroom environment as a necessary element to support optimal learning opportunities for all children.
  
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    PARED 110 Instructional Roles of the Para-Educator (2 credits)



    Course Description
    Address the roles and responsibilities of paraeducators in the instructional setting. Current issues, including supervision, guidelines, role clarification, federal and state legislation, job responsibilities, ethics, professionalism, and confidentiality will be covered with special attention given to federal mandates.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Research and discuss Federal and State Mandates.
    2. Define roles and responsibilities of paraeducators.
    3. Outline the district chain of command and the paraeducator role in relation to other school employees.
    4. Compare and contrast the role of the paraeducator and the role of certificated staff.
    5. Discuss the value of paraeducators in an educational setting.
    6. Describe the concept of a team as it relates to each team member’s role, characteristics of effective teams and assessment of team performance.
    7. Explain the legal requirements, district policies, and procedures of paraeducators.
    8. Explain professional ethical standards and confidentiality as they relate to the role of the paraeductor.
    9. Maintain appropriate records to assist with team communication, accountability, and effective instruction.
    10. Demonstrate effective communication techniques with staff, parents, and students.
    11. Apply effective problem-solving techniques in a workplace team setting.
    12. Implement effective time management.
  
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    PARED 117 Administration and Scoring (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Course is designed to provide instructional assistants with proper testing administration skills for standardized testing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss Woodcock-Johnson III for use in K-12 environment
    2. Describe testing procedures for standardized testing.
    3. Differentiate between procedures for standardized and informal testing.
    4. Demonstrate proper administration and scoring techniques of testing instruments.
    5. Determine various basals and ceilings for the different subtests and how to establish them.
  
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    PARED 130 Classroom and Behavior Management (3 credits)



    Course Description
    An introduction to the management of children’s behavior in the classroom. Explores a variety of approaches used to maintain order in the classroom.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explain and give five examples of proactive management.
    2.Identify disruptive classroom behaviors and techniques for addressing these behaviors.
    3.Plan and implement activities in small groups based on the individual needs of the children within that group.
    4.Identify and list five ways to make transition periods more successful.
    5.Describe classroom management techniques.
    6.Discuss the importance of modeling appropriate behavior.
    7.Examine classroom techniques used to promote self-esteem in children.
    8.Design and adapt a recordkeeping system for the classroom.
    9.Discuss the roll of the paraprofessional in classroom and behavior management.
    10.Explain the influence of a time schedule on student behavior.
    11.Analyze how the physical environment impacts classroom behavior.
    12.Explore the effect of gender and ethnic issues on the management of a classroom.
  
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    PARED 210 Observation, Assessment, Record Keeping (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Techniques in observation, test administration and recordkeeping in the public school. Ethical considerations and legal responsibilities included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Write an objective descriptive observation of a child’s behavior.
    2.Recognize, document, and report signs of child abuse, substance abuse or other significant problems.
    3.Administer and score standardized, achieveent, placement, and classroom tests as directed.
    4.Explain the importance of test results in determining instructional methods, materials, and lesson plans.
    5.Review district’s assessment plan to include: performance-based assessments, portfolio assessments and writing assessments.
    6.Maintain student records including on-going files and grades as directed by classroom teacher.
    7.Maintain appropriate documentation to comply with state and federal standards as directed by classroom teacher.
    8.Review placement selection procedures.

Emergency Medical Services

  
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    EMS 150 Medical Math & Medical Terminology (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides instruction in various methods of medical drug calculations and dosing of medications commonly utilized in emergency settings, as well as an introduction to medical terminology.

    Student Outcomes
    1.       Summarize the etymologies of medical terms with regards to root words, prefixes, and suffixes. 
    2.       Apply basic medical vocabulary to emergency medical services.
    3.       Solve basic mathematical problems and dosage calculations emergency medical services personnel face using dimensional analysis, fractional and decimal operations, fractional/decimal conversions, percentages, ratios, proportions, simple algebraic functions as well as metric conversions.
  
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    EMS 160 Introduction to Chemical & Biological Principles (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to basic chemical and biological principles.  Topics include molecular structure, energy, chemical bonding, nomenclature, organic compounds, cell structure, cell function, and cell division. Lab included. 

    This course is required for students in the EMS program.

    Student Outcomes
    Utilize information contained in the Periodic Table of Elements to determine element properties in order to predict chemical reactivity and chemical interaction.
    Relate energy changes to chemical equations in order to understand chemical and biological reactions.
    Apply correct terminology and understanding of cell theory, cell life cycle, and cell physiology.
    Describe the characteristics of organic compounds and their interactions in biological chemistry. 
    Describe the process of DNA replication and protein synthesis. 
    Demonstrate proper hands-on use and care of a compound light microscope.

  
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    EMS 210 Emergency Medical Technician I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Proof of college level reading, Washington State EMT Requirements 18.73 RCW, 246-976-141 WAC, local Hospital immunization/background check for clinical rotations, AHA Healthcare Provider/BLS or Military CPR Certification.

    Course Description
    A foundational course outlining the fundamental principles of the Emergency Medical System (EMS). Cognitive abilities include an introduction into lifesaving skills in airway management, topographic anatomy, and basic pharmacology. Course also concentrates on the safety and well-being of the EMS provider, medical and legal issues, and documentation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge and skills based on the Emergency medical System (EMS), medical terminology for effective communication, and the basics of human anatomy and physiology pertaining to patient care.
    2. Differentiate the major physiologic and psycho-social developmental stages of the human life span.
    3. Evaluate understanding and decision making for positive patient outcomes, including medical
    direction, practical application of treatment, and interventions as indicated.
  
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    EMS 211 Emergency Medical Technician II (5 credits)



    Prerequisite EMS 210  with at least a 2.0 grade and concurrent enrollment in EMT 210.

    Course Description
    Course will build on foundational practices of EMS 210 as students begin to develop additional tools to determine the nature of illness, along with the implementation and analyzation of treatments during various medical emergencies. Students will demonstrate cognitive and practical understanding in both group and individual evaluations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate and differentiate proper treatment modalities based on the signs and symptoms of nature of illness.
    2. Identify different medical emergencies and the evaluation of the nature of illness.
    3. Demonstrate how to properly determine course of treatment for patients after completing a thorough patient assessment and determine the appropriate destination.
    4. Apply fundamental knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and treatment modalities to cardiac failure or arrest, respiratory failure or arrest, and shock management.
    5. Form a treatment plan for traumatic injuries in relation to mechanism of injury based on the index of suspicion as it relates to unseen life-threatening injuries.
  
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    EMS 212 Emergency Medical Technician III (5 credits)



    Prerequisite EMS 211  with at least a 2.0 grade and concurrent enrollment in EMT 210 and EMT 211. 

    Course Description
    A progression of skills and knowledge obtained in EMS 210 and EMS 211. Course requires students to execute comprehensive assessments to implement appropriate treatment for both medical and traumatic emergencies. Students will solidify the knowledge gained in the classroom through their individual emergency department rotation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate and differentiate proper treatment due to signs and symptoms associated with mechanisms of injuries.
    2. Access and utilize knowledge necessary to conduct a patient evaluation and administer emergency treatment short of those rendered by advanced life support.
    3. Operate as an emergency service provider using sound judgement; applying rationality, self-awareness,
    critical thinking and discipline in responding to emergency situations.
    4. Effectively operate and maintain equipment used in emergency patient care.
    5. Demonstrate communication of essential continuing patient care information to advance life support personnel.
  
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    EMS 221 Emergency Medical Technician Refresher (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current or expired National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification or current or expired State EMT certification.

    Course Description
    National Standards focused EMT-Refresher for Certified Emergency Medical Professionals to demonstrate cognitive and practical competency in topics required by both State and/or the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians for re-certification. This continuing education refresher class not only teaches the current State and NREMT required topics but also evaluates the student’s proficiency in accurately completing current State/NREMT skill sheets.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate, and differentiate proper treatment due to signs and symptoms associated with mechanisms of injury or nature of illnesses.
    2. Access and utilize knowledge necessary to conduct a patient evaluation and administer emergency treatment short of those rendered by advanced life support personnel.
    3. Operate as an emergency service provider using sound judgement; applying rationality, self-awareness, critical thinking, and discipline in responding to emergency situations.
    4. Effectively operate and care for equipment used in emergency patient care.
    5. Demonstrate communication of essential continuing patient care information to advance life support personnel.
  
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    EMS 222 Emergency Medical Technician Refresher Practicals (.5 credit)



    Prerequisite Current or expired National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification or current or expired State EMT certification.

    Course Description
    National Standards focused EMT-Refresher Practicals for Certified Emergency Medical Professionals to demonstrate practical competency in topics required by both State and/or the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians for re-certification. This continuing education refresher practical class evaluates the student’s proficiency in accurately completing current State/NREMT skill sheets.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate, and differentiate proper treatment due to signs and symptoms associated with mechanisms of injury or nature of illnesses.
    2. Access and utilize knowledge necessary to conduct a patient evaluation and administer emergency treatment short of those rendered by advanced life support personnel.
    3. Operate as an emergency service provider using sound judgement; applying rationality, self-awareness, critical thinking, and discipline in responding to emergency situations.
    4. Effectively operate and care for equipment used in emergency patient care.
    5. Demonstrate communication of essential continuing patient care information to advance life support personnel.
  
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    EMS 223 Providers Emergency Medical Technician (11 credits)



    Prerequisite Affiliated, sponsored, or contracted by an approved EMS Provider/Agency.

    Course Description
    Comprehensive collaboration between Pierce College EMS and Contracting agent to provide specialized Emergency Medical Technician Basic training to pre-designated students. The course meets 2009 DOT/NHTSA standards fulfilling National EMT (NREMT) qualification for certification.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate, and differentiate proper treatment due to signs and symptoms associated with mechanisms of injury or nature of illnesses.
    2. Access and utilize knowledge necessary to conduct a patient evaluation and administer emergency treatment short of those rendered by advanced life support personnel.
    3. Operate as an emergency service provider using sound judgement; applying rationality, self-awareness, critical thinking, and discipline in responding to emergency situations.
    4. Effectively operate and care for equipment used in emergency patient care.
    5. Demonstrate communication of essential continuing patient care information to advance life support personnel.
  
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    EMS 224 Emergency Medical Technician Fast Track (12 credits)



    Prerequisite College level English with at least a 2.0 grade; Healthcare Provider CPR.

    Course Description
    Provides intensive, accelerated Emergency Medical Technician basic training to students taking course in the shortened summer session. Students with prior college experience and/or exemplary time management skills are ideal for this course. This course requires time management and self-direction. Possessing a basic knowledge of First Responder, Anatomy and Physiology and/or medical terminology is recommended. The course meets 2009 DOT/NHTSA standards fulfilling National EMT (NREMT) qualification for certification.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate for and address potential hazards to the patient(s), civilians, and emergency management team during an emergency.
    2. Access and utilize knowledge necessary to conduct a patient evaluation and administer emergency treatment short of those rendered by advanced life support personnel.
    3. Effectively operate and care for equipment used in emergency patient care.
    4. Operate as an emergency service provider using sound judgment; applying rationality, self-awareness, critical thinking and discipline and responding to emergency situations.
    5. Communicate essential continuing patient care information to advanced life support personnel. (Outcomes pending approval of EMS Advisory Committee)
  
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    EMS 260 Emergency Medical Services (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite TBD based on course content.

    Course Description
    Applies principles of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems to meet specific educational requirements of a military unit, civilian organization, state agency or group of individual. Typical courses could include: EMS content required by DSHS for facility staff; courses to prepare EMT’s to become certified Evaluators or Senior Emergency Services Instructors (SEI); slected EMS topics for military unites; and EMS management content.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define Emergency Medical Services (EMS) roles in a variety of professional health care environments.
    2. Apply fundamental knowledge of the anatomy and function of human systems to the practice of Emergency Medical Services (EMS).
    3. Use proper medical terms for communication with Medical Professionals and modify information for non-medical persons.
    4. Apply evidence based assessment to emergency medical situations.
    5. Evaluate emergency situations which may require immediate communication with Medical Director or other professionals for advice, direction related to administration of emergency treatment or procedures in specific situations.
    6. Additional content to be determined to meet the specific educational requirements of the specific audience.
  
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    EMS 261 Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (13.6 credits)



    Prerequisite Current National Registry Certification (NREMT) as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) or an equivalent Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) or a current and valid state EMT certification. One year of prehospital related field experience. Current CPR certification American Heart Association “BLS” Healthcare Provider or Military Training Network (MTN). Must be at least 17 years old at the beginning of the course.

    Course Description
    This course is designed for individuals with experience in the medical field as it relates to prehospital medical care. The Advanced Emergency Medical Technician Program (AEMT) expands the scope of practice of current Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) to provide basic and limited advanced emergency medical care and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. Training will include intravenous therapy (IV), electrocardiogram (EKG) and medication administration. The advanced emergency medical technician is a link from the scene to the emergency health care system.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply advanced emergency assessment, treatment and transportation based on clinical findings for an acutely ill patient.
    2. Apply fundamental knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and differentiate treatment modalities for cardiac failure or arrest, respiratory failure or arrest, shock management, and post-resuscitation management.
    3. Demonstrate proficiency in psycho-motor skills of invasive interventions. Example: IV, IO, and airway management.
    4. Demonstrate proper treatment modalities for traumatic injuries in relation to mechanism of injury, based on the index of suspicion as it relates to unseen life-threatening injuries.
  
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    EMS 262 EMS Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (1.5 credits)



    Prerequisite Serve in a role as a provider involved in the delivery of trauma patient care.

    Course Description
    This course is designed for individuals with experience in the medical field as it relates to pre-hospital medical care. The Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) expands the scope of practice of current Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) to provide basic and advanced emergency trauma care. Training will include advanced airway techniques in a trauma patient, tourniquet application, needle decompression, wound packing, disabilities pertaining to traumatic brain injuries and spinal trauma, and other special considerations. Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support is a link from the scene to the emergency health care system.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess, evaluate and differentiate proper treatment modalities due to signs and symptoms of mechanism of injury.
    2. Identify different traumatic emergencies and the evaluation of the mechanism of injury.
    3. Demonstrate how to properly determine course of treatment for patients after completing a thorough patient assessment.
    4. Apply fundamental knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and treatment modalities of trauma.
    5. Form a treatment plan for traumatic injuries in relation to mechanism of injury and based on the index of suspicion as it relates to unseen life-threatening injuries.
  
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    EMT 150 Medical Math & Medical Terminology (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course provides instruction in various methods of medical drug calculations and dosing of medications commonly utilized in emergency settings, as well as an introduction to medical terminology.

    Student Outcomes
    1.       Summarize the etymologies of medical terms with regards to root words, prefixes, and suffixes. 
    2.       Apply basic medical vocabulary to emergency medical services.
    3.       Solve basic mathematical problems and dosage calculations emergency medical services personnel face using dimensional analysis, fractional and decimal operations, fractional/decimal conversions, percentages, ratios, proportions, simple algebraic functions as well as metric conversions.

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 250 Applied Numerical Methods in Engineering (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 163  with at least a 1.5 grade

    Course Description
    Numerical solutions to problems in engineering and science using modern scientific computing tools. Application of mathematical judgment in selecting computational algorithms and communicating results. Introduction to MATLAB programming for numerical computation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write and document effective Matlab scripts involving logical and iterative flow control and file input and
    output.
    2. Utilize the vector/matrix paradigm underlying Matlab to write efficient commands to manipulate data and implement
    numerical solution algorithms.
    3. Produce effective plots of numerical data using Matlab’s various data visualization functions.
    4. Explain the consequences of finite precision and the inherent limits of the numerical methods considered.
    5. Select appropriate numerical methods to apply to various types of problems in engineering and science in
    consideration of the mathematical operations involved, accuracy requirements, and available computational
    resources.
    6. Demonstrate understanding of the mathematics concepts underlying the numerical methods considered.
    7. Demonstrate understanding and implementation of numerical solution algorithms applied to various mathematical
    problems including: finding roots of equations, solving systems of algebraic equations, curve fitting,
    interpolation, numerical differentiation of data and functions, and solutions of ordinary differential equations.
  
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    ENGR& 114 Engineering Graphics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGR 110 - CCN

    Prerequisite Completion of Math Guided Self-Placement (GSP)

    Course Description
    An introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD) using software based on parametric solid modeling. Students will use the software to create virtual models, show the models in various projections and views, manage the associated computer files, and produce engineering drawings. The course includes the engineering graphics topics of three-dimensional visualization, sketching, displaying solid objects in two-dimensional views, dimensioning, and reading engineering drawings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and construct three-dimensional parts and assemblies using CAD software.
    2. Read and produce detailed parts and assembly drawings in CAD using accepted visual, dimensioning and tolerance
    techniques.
    3. Produce original three-dimensional computer models of components and their assemblies.
    4. Demonstrate the application of CAD drawing and visualization to engineering design.
    5. Demonstrate surface modeling in CAD.
    6. Use a combination of parametric, surface and solid modeling to create CAD models.
    7. Visualize and sketch three-dimensional objects in two dimensions using various projections and views.
  
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    ENGR& 204 Electrical Circuits (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite PHYS& 223  and MATH& 163   with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these courses

    Course Description
    An introduction to electrical engineering through basic circuit and system concepts. Topics include: resistors, sources, capacitors, inductors, operational amplifiers, node and mesh analysis, Thevenin and Norton equivalents and RLC circuits. Solution of first and second order linear differential equations associated with basic circuit forms will be used.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify linear systems and represent those systems in schematic form
    2. Explain precisely what the fundamental circuit variables mean and why the fundamental laws governing them are true
    3. Apply Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws, Ohm’s law and the terminal relations describing inductive and capacitive energy-storage elements to
    circuit problems
    4. Simplify circuits using series and parallel equivalents and using Thevenin and Norton equivalents
    5. Perform node and loop analyses and set these up in standard matrix format
    6. Explain the physical underpinnings of capacitance and inductance
    7. Identify and model 1st and 2nd order electric systems involving capacitors and inductors
    8. Predict the transient behavior of 1st and 2nd order circuits
    9. Analyze AC steady-state responses in terms of impedance
    10. Analyze AC circuits in the frequency domain, including resonance
    11. Perform DC and AC steady-state power calculations
    12. Build circuits on breadboards and perform electrical measurements
  
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    ENGR& 214 Statics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGR 210 - CCN

    Prerequisite Concurrent enrollment in or completion of PHYS& 221  with at least a 1.5 grade 

    Course Description
    Introduction to the principles of Statics. Analysis of two-dimensional and three-dimensional force systems, free-body diagrams and equilibrium equations, analysis of trusses, frames, machines, centroids and distributed forces friction applications. Vector methods used throughout the course.

    Student Outcomes
    Force and Moment Systems (A,B)
    1. Express forces and moments using scalar and vector methods.
    2. Perform vector operations of force systems using graphical, trigonometric, and component methods.
    3. Calculate moments, couples, and force-couple systems using scalar and vector methods.
    4. Reduce non-concurrent force systems in order to simplify analysis.
    Equilibrium Analysis (C,D)
    5. Draw free-body diagrams and apply static equilibrium to analyze 2- and 3-dimensional systems.
    6. Determine internal forces/moments in structural members and represent them with equations and diagrams.
    Distributed Forces and Geometric Properties (E)
    7. Determine geometric properties of simple and composite bodies.
    8. Analyze distributed forces on structures such as cantilevers and beams.
    Structures (F)
    9. Apply static equilibrium to analyze forces in trusses, frames and machines.
    10. Analyze problems involving friction
    General Outcomes
    11. Formulate reasonable and productive methods to solve problems.
    12. Work effectively with peers as a productive member of a group. The group will produce a group project to report and solve problems.
  
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    ENGR& 215 Dynamics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGR 230 - CCN

    Prerequisite ENGR& 214  and PHYS& 221  with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these classes

    Course Description
    Introduction to the principles of Dynamics. Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies. Kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using equilibrium, work-energy, and impulse-momentum methods. Vector methods used throughout the course.

    Student Outcomes
    Kinematics of Particles and Rigid Bodies (A,B)
    1. Describe the kinematic behavior of a particle or rigid body in rectilinear, curvilinear, or space motion.
    2. Determine kinematic behavior using analytical and graphical methods.
    3. Analyze 2D motion using applicable coordinate systems rectangular, polar, or normal-tangential.
    4. Analyze 3D motion using applicable coordinate systems rectangular, cylindrical, or spherical.
    5. Describe the kinematic behavior of particles and rigid bodies in relative motion.

    Kinetics of Particles and Rigid Bodies (C,D)
    6. Describe the kinetic behavior of particles and rigid bodies using Newtons” method.
    7. Describe the kinetic behavior of particles and rigid bodies using the work-energy method.
    8. Describe the kinetic behavior of particles and rigid bodies using the impulse-momentum method.

    General Outcomes
    9. Use computer software for analysis.
    10. Complete a design project and write a technical report.
    11. Formulate reasonable and productive methods to solve problems.
    12. Work as a productive member of a group.
    13. Participate actively and responsibly in all course activities.
  
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    ENGR& 224 Thermodynamics (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGR 260 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 161  and PHYS& 221  with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these courses

    Course Description
    Introduction to the basic principles including properties, processes and state equations. First law analysis of closed and open systems; energy interactions, work, heat, flow devices. Second law analysis of closed systems, cycles, entropy and energy.

    Student Outcomes
    Thermodynamic Concepts and Properties (A,B)

    1. Identify thermodynamic properties such as temperature, pressure, and specific volume in order to analyze problems.
    2. Identify thermodynamic processes and phases using property diagrams.
    3. Determine thermodynamic properties and changes using charts, tables and state equations.

    First Law Analysis (C)
    4. Apply the first law to analyze the behavior of closed systems.
    5. Apply the first law to analyze the behavior of open systems such as nozzles, turbines, compressors and heat exchangers.
    6. Apply the first law to analyze steady and unsteady flow.
    7. Apply the first law to compressible and incompressible fluids

    Second Law Analysis (D,E)
    8. Apply the second law to analyze the behavior of heat engines, heat pumps and refrigeration systems.
    9. Apply the concepts of entropy to open and closed systems.

    Power Cycles (F)
    10. Analyze various standard cycles including Carnot, Otto, Diesel, Brayton, Rankine and combined vapor-gas cycles.
  
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    ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGR 240 - CCN

    Prerequisite ENGR& 214  and PHYS& 221  with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these classes

    Course Description
    Introduction to the principles of Mechanics of Materials. Analysis of stress, strain, and deformation in solid materials. Development of the relationships between load, stress, and deformation in columns, shafts, and beams. Analysis and design of members under tension, compression, shear, torsion, and bending.

    Student Outcomes
    Equilibrium Analysis (A)
    1. Draw complete free-body diagrams for two and three dimensional structures
    2. Use equilibrium methods to analyze two and three dimensional structures
    3. Find internal forces and moments in structural members

    Axial and Shear Stress Analysis (B,C,D,E)
    4. Determine simple axial and direct shear stress in members
    5. Determine axial and shear strain in members
    6. Select appropriate material properties for analysis
    7. Determine the deformation of axially loaded members
    8. Calculate support reactions for statically indeterminate members.
    9. Calculate thermal stress and determine concentration factors in members

    Torsional Stress Analysis (F)
    10. Determine torsional stress and angle of twist in round shafts

    Bending Analysis (G,H,I)
    11. Develop load, shear, bending moment diagrams using equilibrium analysis, and graphical methods
    12. Calculate bending stress using the flexure formula
    13. Design simple beams for strength, stiffness, and stability

    Transverse Shear Analysis (J,K)
    14. Calculate transverse shear and shear flow in beams
    15. Calculate stress-strain transformations for principal stresses and strains using Mohr’s circle

    General Outcomes
    16. Use computer software for analysis
    17. Formulate reasonable and productive methods to solve problems
    18. Work as a productive member of a group
    19. Participate actively and responsibly in all course activities

English

  
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    ENGL 090 Spelling (2 credits)



    Course Description
    The improvement of spelling skills. Students will learn how to spell a variety of challenging words while learning tactics to improve their spelling skills with future vocabulary as well.

    Student Outcomes
    1. To learn basic spelling rules and use them to spell effectively.
    2. To learn spelling tactics and use them to spell effectively (phonetics, mnemonics, parts of speech, prefixes, and word endings, etc.) effectively.
    3. Be able to identify homophones and employ tactics to use them appropriately and spell them correctly.
    4. To learn how to effectively study weekly spelling lists and develop effective learning habits.
    5. To use spelling resources, such as the dictionary, the misspeller’s dictionary, and spell checkers.
    6. To study and master lists of ‘spelling demons’ (difficult words)
    7. To master ancillary spelling skills, such as capitalization, hyphenation, abbreviation, and apostrophe use (for those taking 3 credits)
  
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    ENGL 095 English Accelerated Learning Support Course (2 credits)



    Course Description
    ENGL 095 helps students develop the skills to succeed in pre-college English and in English 101 thereafter.  Course outcomes focus on effective reading, writing, and editing processes. Class must be taken concurrently with ENGL 098 or ENGL 099.  

    Student Outcomes
    Demonstrate productive self-reflection and self-assessment of one's rhetorical choices and writing processes
    Use and apply the writing process through prewriting, organizing, drafting, and proofreading.
    Apply critical thinking and analytical skills to reading and writing assignments.
    Develop critical reading skills through activities such as annotating texts, keeping a reading notebook, and developing a vocabulary notebook.
    Develop and demonstrate effective language use (grammar, mechanics, syntax, and sentence variety).
  
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    ENGL 098 Foundational Composition (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement.

    Course Description
    Foundational Composition introduces students to processes of reading and writing academic essays and other genres for effective communication and self-expression.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Implement appropriate reading comprehension strategies.
    2. Summarize and respond in writing to a variety of texts.
    3. Incorporate rhetorically appropriate writing strategies to compose in multiple genres.
    4. Develop and use writing processes (e.g., prewriting, inventing, organizing, drafting, revising, and
    proofreading).
    5. Write and format essays that develop and support a thesis.
    6. Write effective paragraphs with a focus (e.g., topic sentence and support).
    7. Demonstrate unity, coherence, and focus for clarity and self-expression.
    8. Practice and use grammar, mechanics, syntax, and sentence variety appropriately.
  
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    ENGL 099 Introduction to Composition (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement, or ENGL 098  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    ENGL 099 prepares students for college composition by introducing them to academic research, reading, writing, and rhetorical concepts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compose in multiple genres and mediums, including academic essays.
    2. Apply reading comprehension strategies.
    3. Utilize multiple writing processes to create texts.
    4. Use rhetorical strategies to compose and analyze texts.
    5. Demonstrate unity, coherence, focus, and clarity in the composition of essays and other texts.
    6. Utilize research skills to inform the writing process.
    7. Integrate and document sources appropriately.
    8. Use rhetorically appropriate grammar and mechanics in composition.
  
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    ENGL 107 Composition III: Writing about Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Communications; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Completion of ENGL& 101  with grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    Writing expository and argumentative essays based upon literary readings and studies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Appreciate value and meaning of literature
    2. Write unified, coherent analytical essays that develop and support a thesis statement
    3. Critically analyze literary works through the application of theoretical approaches
    4. Explicate literary works through the appropriate use of literary terminology
    5. Practice the skills of information competency in research
    6. Apply the writing process in the composition of expository and argumentative essays
    7. Recognize historical, social, philosophical, psychological, and cultural contexts for literature
  
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    ENGL 204 The Bible as Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course is designed to show the themes and structures, literary and cultural significance, of the Bible.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the impact of the Bible on literary traditions.
    2. Critically analyze literary forms utilized within the Bible.
    3. Explain the role translation plays in Biblical reception and interpretation.
    4. Identify symbolism and interpretive lenses accessible within Biblical Texts.
    5. Understand the basic philosophical and ethical beliefs presented in Judeo-Christian sacred texts.
    6. Recognize historical, social, and cultural contexts of the Bible.
  
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    ENGL 205 Introduction to Mythology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of mythologies from two or more cultures with some study of what myth is and how it informs literature. (Topics may vary.)

    Student Outcomes
    1.Analyze the mythology according to specific criteria, such as its social and historical contexts.

    2.Read and interpret the mythology of two, or more, cultures.

    3.Appraise the vast conceptual differences between preliterate and literate society.

    4.Compare cultural perspectives, as they are influenced by mythology.

    5.Recognize mythology as an influence on literature.

    6.Recognize the universal presence of mythology.

    7.Write one or more essays that support a thesis related to the course content or applying concepts from the course
    material.

    8.Research, write and document an essay that critically engages the course content.

    9.Evaluate the relevance of the course content to yourself as an individual and as a member of society.
  
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    ENGL 207 Native American Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Native American Literature: its themes, issues, symbols, application to personal, family, and regional cultures.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Recognize and discuss past and present stereotypes of Native Americans.
    2.Discuss the diversity, as well as the shared beliefs and experiences, of Native American literature and cultures.
    3.Analyze the influence of Euro-American colonialism on Native American history, cultures, and literature.
    4.Compare Euro-American and Native American perceptions of nature, land, spirituality, family.
    5.Explain the importance of language and storytelling in Native American cultures.
    6.Analyze how literary elements—voice, imagery, metaphor, symbolism, plot, irony, etc.—work together to create meaning in a work of literature.
    7.Recognize literary conventions and apply them to the study of Native American literature.
  
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    ENGL 210 Multicultural American Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Celebrating the rich diversity of American voices, ENGL 210 focuses on the literary contributions of African Americans, Asian Americans, European Americans, Latinas/Latinos, and Native Americans and introduces the literary genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay as it explores the dominant themes that have shaped the American literary tradition.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read and interpret particular American literary works as multicultural, intersectional texts.
    2. Comprehend the historical and cultural contexts that have shaped the literary contributions of African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinas/Latinos, European Americans, and Native Americans.
    3. Identify the specific elements that comprise the literary genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay, and analyze those elements in the literary works assigned.
    4. Determine how the literary elements employed shape the author’s central theme.
    5. Apply the skills of literary analysis, research, and documentation in writing assignment(s) that critically engage course content.
    6. Identify approaches to literary criticism.
    7. Analyze how literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems.
  
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    ENGL 214 Screenwriting 1 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A writer’s workshop focused on outlining, structuring, formatting, and writing a screenplay to meet the standards of the American film industry for feature film. The course will cover plotting a story, developing characters, and scene creation. Students will complete a story outline (Treatment) and two acts of a feature film, or an outline of a feature length script and an entire twenty to thirty minute short.

    Student Outcomes
    Student Outcomes:

    1.Create two acts of a well drafted screenplay, or a complete short.
    2.Utilize industry standards for script writing and script formatting.
    2.Demonstrate understanding of story format in their writing and peer evaluation.
    3.Evaluate scripts (self and workshops).
    4.Analyze screenplays (self and peers) for genre, plot, character, dialogue, and narrative pacing.
    5.Revise creative work - including story treatment (outline), Acts, scenes, and pitch.
    6.Develop a written and/or oral pitch of one’s creative work for theatre and film production.
  
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    ENGL 239 World Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Explores the rich diversity of world cultures through fiction, poetry and drama.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify the elements that comprise the literary genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and the essay.
    2.Read and interpret representative works of literature.
    3.Explain how literary genres, trends, and themes are elements of cultural history.
    4.Analyze the representation of specific cultural groups in world literature.
    5.Explore how literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues and, problems.
    6.Analyze works of literature using various approaches to literary criticism.
    7.Write one or more literary analyses that develop and support a thesis related to course readings and content.
    8.Use research skills to locate information relevant to the course content.
    9.Research, write, and document a project that critically engages the course content.
  
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    ENGL 249 Creative Writing - Special Projects (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 245

    Course Description
    English 249 concentrates on producing original writings in a specific genre. Each quarter will focus on a particular genre such as screenwriting, science fiction, mystery, playwriting, or autobiography.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and employ structure and content in writing in various genres.
    2. Analyze and utilize writing techniques including deviations in grammar, mechanics, syntax, and organization.
    3. Employ theme in various genres.
    4. Identify and utilize dialogue and dialect in genre writing.
    5. Analyze and utilize character and point of view in genre writing.
    6. Identify and develop voice in individual writing.
    7. Identify and employ description, images and sound in genre writing.
    8. Evaluate published and peer - written genre writing for literary quality.
    9. Articulate and apply specific criteria for evaluations of quality.
    10. Explain process of submitting genre writing to journals, publishers, production companies, etc.
  
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    ENGL 250 Shakespeare Festival (1 to 10 credits)



    Course Description
    Familiarizes students with Shakespearean drama, elements of drama and elements of the theater. Students must attend the Ashland, Oregon Festival.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and analyze major themes and topics presented by the plays
    2.Identify, analyze and evaluate staging techniques presented in the productions
    3.Identify and analyze literary elements presented in plays
    4.Identify and analyze issues topical to the year’s productions
    5.Identify and analyze historical and cultural contexts and meanings of the pays
    6.Evaluate plays as drama and as theater
    7.Describe the appeal of live theater
    8.Analyze a particular aspect of the play in a written or oral project
  
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    ENGL 256 Advanced Composition-Portfolio (2 credits)



    Prerequisite ENGL& 101  with a 2.0 or better, and two of the following courses: ENGL& 102 , ENGL 107 , ENGL& 235 , or JOURN 102  with a 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    Advanced study in rhetoric concentrating on the revision process in writing and editing. Required capstone course for student completion of Pierce College’s Written Communication Endorsement.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write self-critiques and/or peer critiques of student-generated texts based upon a rhetorical analysis of purpose and audience.
    2. Revise student-generated texts by applying specific rhetorical strategies.
    3. Apply the strategic use of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics in the composition process.
    4. Apply appropriate documentation of research in revised compositions.
  
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    ENGL 264 Literature of U.S. Slavery and Abolition (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 220

    Course Description
    This class focuses on the study of literary works, themes, and rhetoric associated with U.S. slavery and abolition, and its impact on modern American literature and culture.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Construct the relationships between major abolitionist figures and movements.
    2. Explain how works and genres contributed to slavery and the abolition movement.
    3. Evaluate the rhetorical effects of abolitionist patronage of and editorial assistance with (auto)biographical works.
    4. Describe and compare different slave cultures in the United States.
    5. Identify and compare major pro-slavery and abolitionist figures and writers.
    6. Explain the abolition movement and other antebellum reform movements.
    7. Analyze lasting effects of U.S. slavery and abolition on modern race relations.
    8. Synthesize resources involved in archiving, disseminating and influencing cultural memory.
  
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    ENGL 266 Women Writers - International Mosaic (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 230

    Course Description
    Emphasis on twentieth century women writers across the international spectrum.

    Student Outcomes
    1) Analyze the author’s portrayal of the uniqueness of female perspective and experiences.
    2) Identify social and/or biological bases of gender and sexual orientation presented in women’s writing.
    3) Explore social, historical, and economic contexts of women’s writing.
    4) Analyze how women writers reinforce and/or challenge cultural stereotypes.
    5) Identify the conventions of specific literary genres.
    6) Analyze the use of imagery, symbolism, and metaphor in women’s literature.
    7) Utilize the conventions of an essay about literature.
  
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    ENGL& 101 English Composition I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Communications; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 101 - CCN

    Prerequisite Placement or ENGL 099  with a grade of 2.0 or higher. College Level reading ability.

    Course Description
    A composition course focusing on writing academic essays, developing rhetorical knowledge and critical reading skills, and applying effectively the principles of college writing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compose work in a variety of genres, including but not limited to thesis-driven, college-level essays that synthesize researched sources (3,500 words minimum of formal writing, total, excluding revisions) by using the writing process.
    2. Apply key rhetorical concepts (writer, audience, subject, purpose, and context) in order to analyze and compose a variety of texts.
    3. Analyze texts as purposeful responses to a variety of situations and contexts as well as products of social identity (e.g., gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class).
    4. Use rhetorically appropriate English language structures, including disciplinary conventions of syntax, grammar, punctuation, spelling voice, tone, and diction.
    5. Demonstrate information competency by locating, reading, and evaluating a diverse range of primary and secondary research materials (both scholarly and popular) in order to synthesize original ideas with those from appropriate sources.
    6. Quote, paraphrase, cite and document sources appropriately in a consistent documentation style to maintain academic honesty and intellectual integrity.
  
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    ENGL& 102 Composition II: Argumentation and Research (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Communications; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 103

    Prerequisite ENGL& 101  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    Writing and analyzing argumentation essays that logically support and develop a claim (thesis) writing a research paper using the MLA or APA style of documentation researching data using the latest research tools available, including electronic data bases and the Internet becoming information competent.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write argumentative essays that logically support and develop a claim (thesis) using inductive and/or deductive reasoning Write a 10-15 page research paper using appropriate documentation style
    2. Provide sound, evidentiary support for claims
    3. Use sources effectively in compositions
    4. Practice the skills of information competency: be able to access, evaluate, and apply information appropriately Use the tools of research, including electronic data bases and the Internet
    5. Learn about the styles of documentation appropriate to other disciplines
    6. Gain an awareness of diversity of voices
    7. Write abstracts, summaries
    8. Analyze and evaluate readings as sound, logically developed arguments
  
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    ENGL& 111 Introduction to Literature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 200 - CCN

    Course Description
    Examines literary works and techniques through analyses of representative fiction, drama, and poetry emphasizing diversity in content and expression through form.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the elements that comprise the literary genres of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay.
    2. Compare multicultural works of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay as representative responses to historical, social, and cultural contexts.
    3. Analyze works of poetry, fiction, drama, and essay using various approaches to literary criticism.
    4. Demonstrate research skills to locate and apply information relevant to the course content.
    5. Research and document a written project that critically engages the course content.
  
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    ENGL& 112 Introduction to Fiction (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 201 - CCN

    Course Description
    Examines literary works and techniques in the genre of fiction, including short stories and novels.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the elements that comprise the literary genre of fiction.
    2. Compare multicultural works of fiction as representative responses to historical, social, and cultural contexts.
    3. Analyze works of fiction using various approaches to literary criticism.
    4. Demonstrate research skills to locate and apply information relevant to the course content.
    5. Research and document a written project that critically engages the course content.
  
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    ENGL& 113 Introduction to Poetry (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 203 - CCN

    Course Description
    Course designed to familiarize students with form, content, and expression in poetry from ancient to contemporary times.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the elements that comprise the literary genre of poetry.
    2. Compare multicultural works of poetry as representative responses to historical, social, and cultural contexts.
    3. Analyze works of poetry using various approaches to literary criticism.
    4. Demonstrate research skills to locate and apply information relevant to the course content.
    5. Research and document a written project that critically engages the course content.
  
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    ENGL& 114 Introduction to Drama (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 202 - CCN

    Course Description
    Examines form and expression of great works of the theatre from Ancient Greece to the present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the elements that comprise the literary genre of drama.
    2. Compare multicultural works of drama as representative responses to historical, social, and cultural contexts.
    3. Analyze works of drama using various approaches to literary criticism.
    4. Demonstrate research skills to locate and apply information relevant to the course content.
    5. Research and document a written project that critically engages the course content.
  
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    ENGL& 220 Introduction to Shakespeare (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 234 - CCN

    Course Description
    ENGL&220 familiarizes students with Shakespeare’s work and reception.

    Student Outcomes
    Describe the conventions of English Renaissance theatre and Shakespeare’s contributions to understand context.
    Analyze the characteristics of Shakespeare's comedies, tragedies, romances, and histories, to investigate genre and mode in literature.
    Describe Shakespearean dramatic structure and poetic structure in order to analyze forms of human expression.
    Analyze literary elements (e.g. plot, character, theme, setting, sonnets etc.) in Shakespeare’s work to develop meaning from creative expression.
    Paraphrase Shakespearean language into contemporary language in order to practice translating meaning across contexts and disciplines.
    Identify and evaluate various interpretations and readings of Shakespeare’s work.
    Examine how Shakespeare’s cultural legacies impact interdisciplinary expression.
  
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    ENGL& 226 British Literature I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 211 - CCN

    Course Description
    A study of representative works of literature written in the British Empire from the Middle Ages into the sixteenth century.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read and interpret representative works of literature in characteristic genres (e.g. fiction, poetry, drama, essays) in order to understand how genre cocreates meaning.
    2. Analyze a work of literature according to specific criteria, in order to understand the social and historical contexts (e.g. evolution of the English language, including the movement from the oral to the literary tradition).
    3. Explain how cultural history helped to shape literary genres and trends and how these literary genres and trends also helped to shape cultural history.
    4. Analyze the representation of diverse, underrepresented groups in the literature in order to examine how identities/positionalities impact perceptions, actions, and the distribution of power and privilege in communities, systems, and institutions.
    5. Critically engage the course content through writing a literary analysis essay.
    6. Critically engage the course content through research in the discipline.
    7. Demonstrate an awareness of how the literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems in order to understand the global nature of this literature.
  
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    ENGL& 227 British Literature II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 212 - CCN

    Course Description
    A study of representative works of literature written in the British Empire from the sixteenth century into the nineteenth century.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read and interpret representative works of literature in characteristic genres (e.g. novels, essays, drama, poetry, biography, and/or literary criticism) in order to understand how genre cocreates meaning.
    2. Analyze a work of literature according to specific criteria, in order to examine its social and historical contexts (e.g. the British Interregnum and Restoration; imperialism and colonialism; rationalism; religious debates; the rise of the middle class and popular literature; the French Revolution; science; capitalism and industrialism; gender; race and the “other.”).
    3. Explain how cultural history helped to shape literary genres and trends and how these literary genres and trends also helped to shape cultural history (e.g. Romance, realism, Gothic, political, social and literary satire, sentimental literature, lyric, elegy, ode).
    4. Analyze the representation of diverse, underrepresented groups in the literature, specifically in regards to colonialism and imperialism in order to examine how identities/positionalities impact perceptions, actions, and the distribution of power and privilege in communities, systems, and institutions.
    5. Critically engage the course content through writing a literary analysis essay.
    6. Critically engage the course content through research in the discipline.
    7. Demonstrate an awareness of how the literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems in order to understand the global nature of this literature.
  
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    ENGL& 228 British Literature III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 213 -CCN

    Course Description
    A study of representative works of literature written in the British Empire from the nineteenth century to present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read and interpret representative works of literature in characteristic genres (e.g. fiction, poetry, drama, essays, biography, criticism) in order to understand how genre cocreates meaning.
    2. Analyze a work of literature according to specific criteria in order to understand its social and historical contexts (e.g., religious movements, the British Empire, industrialism, the World Wars, scientific theories and developments, women’s suffrage, abolition of slavery).
    3. Explain how cultural history helped to shape literary genres and trends and how these literary genres and trends also helped to shape cultural history (e.g. Victorianism, Realism, Pre-Raphaelitism, Modernism, Postmodernism, Postcolonialism).
    4. Analyze the representation of diverse, underrepresented groups in the literature, specifically in regards to colonialism and imperialism in order to examine how identities/positionalities impact perceptions, actions, and the distribution of power and privilege in communities, systems, and institutions.
    5. Critically engage the course content through writing a literary analysis essay.
    6. Critically engage the course content through research in the discipline.
    7. Demonstrate an awareness of how the literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems in order to understand the global nature of this literature.
  
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    ENGL& 235 Technical Writing (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Communications; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 111 - CCN

    Prerequisite ENGL& 101  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    Learn the principles of organizing, developing and expressing technical information. Study rhetorical patterns common to scientific and technical disciplines. Also understand technical writing conventions as they apply to students during their academic careers.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify the purpose of, gather appropriate and accurate information for, and write technical reports for specific audiences (resume, claim letter, instructions assignment, investigative report, proposal, feasibility report).
    2.Acquire the skills of Information Competency: be able to access, evaluate, and apply information appropriately (investigative report, proposal, feasibility report, essay tests, objectives tests).
    3.Transform instructions into informational units set down in a numbered sequence that is in logical order, in both writing and illustrations (instructions assignment).
    4.Analyze the accuracy of and use appropriately graphics in technical documents (graphics assignment, instructions assignment, objective test, investigative report, proposal, feasibility report).
    5.Write at least three different analytical reports implementing the appropriate content and format for each (investigative report, proposal, feasibility report).
    6.Participate actively in collaborative assignments (classroom assignments, feasibility report).
    7.Complete a collaborative team report, such as a real-life feasibility report (feasibility report).
    8.Identify and articulate ethical and multicultural issues in technical writing (classroom assignment, essay test, objective test).
  
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    ENGL& 236 Creative Writing I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 231 - CCN

    Course Description
    A creative writing course which instructs in structure, form, and content of fiction, poetry and plays.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and employ structure, form, and content in fiction, poetry, and plays.
    2.Analyze and utilize writing techniques including deviations in grammar, mechanics, syntax, and organization.
    3.Identify and employ theme in fiction, poetry, and plays
    4.Identify and utilize dialogue and dialect in fiction, poetry, and plays.
    5.Analyze and employ the use of persona, character, and point of view in fiction, poetry, and plays.
    6.Identify and develop voice in individual writing.
    7.Recognize and utilize various genres and forms of fiction, poetry, and plays.
    8.Identify and employ description, images and sound in fiction, poetry, and plays.
    9.Evaluate fiction, poetry, and plays for literary quality.
    10.Express specific criteria for evaluations of quality.
    11.Explain process of submitting fiction to journals.
  
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    ENGL& 237 Creative Writing II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 232 - CCN

    Course Description
    Writing short stories.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and employ structure and plot in a piece of fiction
    2. Utilize good writing techniques including grammar, mechanics, syntax, and organization
    3. Identify and employ theme in a piece of fiction.
    4. Identify and utilize dialogue in a piece of fiction
    5. Analyze the use of character and point of view in a piece of fiction
    6. Identify and develop voice in individual writing.
    7. Recognize various genres of fiction
    8. Identify and employ description, images and sound in a piece of fiction.
    9. Evaluate fiction for literary quality.
    10. Express specific criteria for evaluations of quality
    11. Explain process of submitting fiction to journals.
  
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    ENGL& 238 Creative Writing III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 233 -CCN

    Course Description
    Writing Poetry.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Write original poems utilizing a variety of techniques.
    2. Identify and employ enjambed and end-stopped lines.
    3. Identify and employ sound devices, such as assonance, alliteration, and rhyme.
    4. Analyze the use of form in a variety of poems.
    5. Apply various formal devices, such as stanza form, repetition, line length.
    6. Identify and employ various patterns of syntax and diction.
    7. Describe basic patterns of meter.
    8. Use a variety of rhythmic patterns.
    9. Analyze the relationship between form and content in various poems.
    10. Identify and employ basic tropes, such as metaphor and simile.
    11. Create an effective process for revision and apply it to original poems.
    12. Explain the process of submitting poems to journals.
    13. Evaluate poems for literary quality.
    14. Express specific criteria for evaluations of quality.
  
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    ENGL& 244 American Literature I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 221 - CCN

    Course Description
    Survey of American literature from its early origins to the Civil War.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Read and interpret particular American literary works
    2.Identify the elements that comprise at least one literary genre
    3.Explain how literary genres and themes relate to historical, cultural, and social contexts
    4.Analyze how literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems
    5.Explore the representation of specific cultural groups in American literature
    6.Analyze works of literature using various approaches to literary criticism
    7.Write one or more essays that develop and support a thesis related to course readings and content
    8.Use research skills to locate information relevant to the course content
    9.Apply research and documentation skills in a writing task that critically engage course content
  
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    ENGL& 245 American Literature II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 222 - CCN

    Course Description
    Survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to World War I.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Read and interpret particular American literary works
    2.Identify the elements that comprise at least one literary genre
    3.Explain how literary genres and themes relate to historical, cultural, and social contexts
    4.Analyze how literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems
    5.Explore the representation of specific cultural groups in
    American literature
    6.Analyze works of literature using various approaches to literary criticism
    7.Write one or more essays that develop and support a thesis related to course readings and content
    8.Use research skills to locate information relevant to the course content
    9.Apply research and documentation skills in a writing task that critically engage course content
  
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    ENGL& 246 American Literature III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ENGL 223 -CCN

    Course Description
    Survey of twentieth century literature to the present.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Read and interpret particular American literary works
    2.Identify the elements that comprise at least one literary genre
    3.Explain how literary genres and themes relate to historical, cultural, and social contexts
    4.Analyze how literature and its contexts are relevant to contemporary people, issues, and problems
    5.Explore the representation of specific cultural groups in
    American literature
    6.Analyze works of literature using various approaches to literary criticism
    7.Write one or more essays that develop and support a thesis related to course readings and content
    8.Use research skills to locate information relevant to the course content
    9.Apply research and documentation skills in a writing task that critically engage course content -

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 012 ESL Beg Literacy English (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Exam

    Course Description
    A beginning Literacy level ESL course (integrating speaking, listening, reading, writing, and technology) for those needing survival English to develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

  
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    ESL 014 Beginning ESL Literacy Intermediate Integrated - 1 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal 180 or below

    Course Description
    A beginning literacy level ESL course (integrating speaking, listening, reading, writing, and technology) for those needing survival English to develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Reading
    R 1.1 Recognize everyday words or word groups in short, simple text by decoding letter-sound correspondence, isolating and saying first and last sounds, naming pictures to isolate and say initial sounds, sounding out words by segmenting words into separate sounds and syllables, combining or blending sounds, recognizing simple rhyming word patterns, or recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 1.2 Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels, digraphs and blends), and common vocabulary.
    R 1.3 Monitor accuracy of decoding and word recognition using various strategies, such as rereading or making word lists.
    R 1.4 Recall prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in the text.
    2.Writing
    W 1.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 1.2 Follow a highly structured plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs in very simple structures such as lists or responses to prompts for everyday information.
    W 1.3 Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses), numbers (dates, phone #s, addresses, prices, etc) and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience.
    W 1.4 Make a few simple content changes and simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization based on review and feedback from others.
    3. Speaking
    S 1.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words and phrases related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 1.2 Use simple strategies (such as learned words and phases and responding to simple, direct questions) to select and relay information.
    S 1.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and very simple requests for understanding from the listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4. Listening
    L 1.1 Understand and respond to learned words and phrases in simple questions, statements, and high frequency commands as part of short conversations, explanations, instructions, and narratives where the linguistic complexity is considerably simplified.
    L 1.2 Use a few simple formulas to convey understanding and ask for repetition or clarification.
    L 1.3 Use non-verbal and visual clues to understand the basic intent of the speaker and to meet the purpose of the communication.
    5. Goals
    G 1.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 015 Beginning ESL Literacy Computer Technology and Job Readiness-1 (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Casas Exam

    Course Description
    A basic literacy level and survival ESL technology and job rediness course for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    Job Readiness:
    1. Identify and list job skills. (A, B, C, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, N)
    2. Analyze life experiences in order to identify and communicate a simple set of skills transferable to the workplace. (A, B, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    3. Research a job area on the internet with instructor assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    4. Identify employment interests and list short-term and long-term employment goals. (A, B, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    5. Complete a simplified job application. (A, B, C, E, F, G, I, J, K, L,M, N)
    6. Use the computer to prepare a simplified letter of application and skill list. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    7. Compose and send simplified emails and other workplace communications with instructor assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    8. Role play basic information needed for job interviews. (A, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    9. Identify, discuss, practice, and model appropriate work behavior and practices including basic telephone etiquette. (A, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    Technology:
    1. Knowledge and Concepts:
    Recognize the major components of a computer such as a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    1.2.0 Identify available electronic devices such as calculators, copiers, and telephones. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    2. Research Gathering:
    1.1.0 Begin to use technology with assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J)
    1.2.0 Ask for assistance on technology use. (A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I, J)
    3. Applied Proficiency:
    1.1.0 Enter and exit a familiar program with assistance. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J)
    1.2.0 Demonstrate some ability using a mouse and keyboard. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J)
  
  •  

    ESL 016 Beginning ESL Literacy Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar - 1 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 180 or below

    Course Description
    Beginning ESL Literacy Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing survival English develop and enhance their personal, social, educational and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 1.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S1.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions responding to simple, direct questions and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 1.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 1.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 021 Low Beginning ESL Reading - 2 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A beginning level ESL reading course for those who have mastered basic literacy and survival English, and who are ready to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize basic words on personal information form: name, address, telephone number, current date, date of birth, social security number, and sex. (B, F, G, H, I)
    2. Apply sound-symbol relationships and recognize sight word to read simple words and phrases relevant to the individual’s life. (D, F, I)
    3. Read and recognize times and dates including clock time (analog and digital). (A, C, F, H, I)
    4. Sort items according to alphabetical and numerical order. (A, B, D, F, G, H, I)
    5. Interpret simple directions and schedules, signs, and maps. (A, F, G, H, I)
    6. Read simple notes and messages. (F, G, H, I)
  
  •  

    ESL 022 Low Beginning ESL Writing-2 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 181or above

    Course Description
    Beginning writing for those needing survival English to develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W 2.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 2.2 Follow a highly structured plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs in very simple structures such as lists or responses to prompts for everyday information.
    W 2.3 Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, and addresses), numbers (dates, phone #s, addresses, prices, etc) and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience.
    W 2.4 Make a few simple content changes and simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization based on review and feedback from others.

    2. G 1.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 024 Low Beginning ESL Integrated - 2 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS Appraisal Exam, CASAS score of 181-190, and instructor permission

    Course Description
    A low beginning level ESL course (integrating speaking, listening, reading, writing, and technology) for those who have mastered basic literacy and survival English, and who are read to further develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Reading
    R 2.1 Decode and recognize familiar every day, simple words in short, simple text by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules, using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 2.2 Demonstrate familiarity with words, phrases, and simple sentences.
    R 2.3 Locate discrete items of information in simplified text.
    R 2.4 Monitor accuracy of decoding simple sentences using various strategies such as rereading, copying, or making word lists.
    R 2.5 Recall prior knowledge to understand information in simple texts.
    2.Writing
    W 2.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 2.2 Follow a highly structured plan to organize ideas around a single familiar topic.
    W 2.3 Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary (such as words with personal significance and commonly-used adjectives, pronouns and prepositions) and simple sentence structures to produce a few sentences on a topic.
    W 2.4 Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation based on review and feedback from others.
    3.Speaking
    S 2.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 2.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions responding to simple, direct questions and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 2.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.
    4.Listening
    L 2.1 Understand and respond to learned words and phrases in simple questions, statements, and high frequency commands as part of short conversations, explanations, instructions, and narratives where the linguistic complexity is simplified.
    L 2.2 Use a few simple formulas to convey understanding, and ask for repetition or clarification and one or two simple strategies for gathering missing information and/or repairing problems in communication.
    L 2.3 Use non-verbal and visual clues, as well as socio-cultural, linguistic, and other background knowledge to understand the basic intent of the speaker and to meet the purpose of the communication.
    5.Goals
    G 2.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 025 Low Beginning ESL Computer Technology and Job Readiness-2 (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Casas Exam

    Course Description
    A beginning level ESL technology and job rediness course for students who want to develop English communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and list job skills. (A, B, C, E, f, G, H, I, J, K, L, N)
    2. Analyze life experiences in order to identify and communicate skills transferable to the workplace. (A, B, C, E, f , G, I, J, K, L, N)
    3. Research a job area on the internet with instructor assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, f, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    4. Identify employment interests and list short-term and long-term employment goals. (A, B, C, E, f, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    5. Complete a simplified job application. (A, B, C, D, E, f, G, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    6. Use the computer to prepare a simplified letter of application and resume. (A, B, C, D, E, f, G, I, J, K, L, N)
    7. Compose and send emails and other workplace communications with instructor assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, f, G, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    8. Role play job interviews. (A, C, D, E, f, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    9. Identify, discuss, practice, and model appropriate work behavior and practices including telephone ediquette. (A, C, D, E, f, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N)
    Technology:
    1. Knowledge and Concepts:
    Name the parts of the computer, such as a monitor, a keyboard, and a mouse. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J, K, L , M,N)
    2. Resource Gathering:
    Follow simple instructions for using technology with assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J)
    2.2.0 Ask for assistance from others. (A, B, c, D, E, F, H, I, J)
    2.3.0 Begin to share information with others with instructor assistance. (A, B, C, D, E, F, H, I, J)
    3. Applied Proficiency:
    2.1.0 Use the mouse with some confidence and accuracy to pint, click, and drag. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J)
    2.2.0 Appropriately access programs by inserting a disk or CD into a computer drive. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J)
    2.3.0 Use basic keys, such as shift, delete, space bar, backspace, enter, arrows, and numbers. (A, B, C, D, F, H, I, J)
    3.3.4 Begin to use electronic devices such as fax, copier, calculator, and tape recorder to acquire, process, and management information. (A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J)
  
  •  

    ESL 026 Low Beginning ESL Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar - 2 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 181or above or completion ESL 016

    Course Description
    Low Intensive Oral Communication and Grammar class for those needing English to develop their communication skills in order to enhance their personal, social, and workplace environments.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Speaking
    S 2.1 Recall and use a limited set of learned words, phrases, and short sentences related to basic personal information, basic objects, and a limited number of activities and immediate needs in familiar, predictable, and straightforward communication tasks.
    S 2.2 Use simple strategies (such as familiar phrases and questions responding to simple, direct questions and, combining or re-combining learned or heard words and phrases) to select and relay information.
    S 2.3 Apply simple strategies (such as gestures, eye contact, and simple, repeated requests for feedback from listener) to monitor effectiveness of the communication and to meet the speaking purpose.

    2. G 2.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 030 High Beginning ESL Speaking-3 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A low intermediate level ESL course which prepares the learner to aquire English language skills necessary to express orally and in written form; individual references related to employment conditions, education, life and career choices, and to maintain conversations to satisfy basic, everyday needs.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Clearly state skills and interests relevant to the situation in an interview, life-skill situation or a social setting. (A, B, E, F)
    2.Make a simple report about an absence, injury, accident or incident to the appropriate authorities. (A, B, D, E, F)
    3.Respond appropriately to simple follow-up and clarifying questions. (A, D, E, F)
    4.Demonstrate awareness of stressed and unstressed syllables. (E, F)
    5.Use basic vocabulary and simple sentences structure to describe a person, place or event. (A, C, D, E, F)
    6.Initiate and maintain simple conversations using appropriate forms of address. (A, B, D, E, F)
    7.Make a personal excuse or request such as calling in sick or asking for time off. (A, D, E, F)
    8.Use non-verbal behavior of simple phrases to indicate agreement or disagreement. (A, B, C, D, F)
  
  •  

    ESL 031 ESL Intermediate Reading Level 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 191.

    Course Description
    A high beginning level ESL course which prepares the learner to acquire English as a second language skills necessary to express orally and in written form, individual references related to employment conditions, education, life and career choices, and to maintain conversations to satisfy basic everyday needs.

    Student Outcomes
    Reading
    R 3.1 Decode and recognize everyday words in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules, using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R 3.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R 3.3 Locate discrete items of information in texts.
    R 3.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text making a list of new words, or using a simplified dictionary.
    R 3.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.

    G 3.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly.
  
  •  

    ESL 032 ESL Intermediate Writing Level 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Prerequisite CASAS score of 191 and above or completion of ESL 022.

    Course Description
    A high beginning level ESL course which prepares the learner to acquire English as a second language skills necessary to express orally and in written form, individual references related to employment conditions, education, life and career choices, and to maintain conversations to satisfy basic everyday needs.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W 3.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W 3.2 Follow a highly structured plan to organize ideas around a single familiar topic and produce a short but legible and comprehensible draft.
    W 3.3 Appropriately use every day, familiar vocabulary (such as words with personal significance and commonly-used adjectives, pronouns and prepositions) and simple sentence structures to produce a several sentences on a topic.
    W 3.4 Make simple edits of grammar, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
    2. Goals
    G 3.1 Set educational goals as they relate to their roles as workers, citizens, and family members report progress on these goals and revise and update them quarterly
 

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