2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Jul 05, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Kinesiology

  
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    KINS 267 Internship (3 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 110, KINS 128, KINS 155 , KINS 250 , KINS 252 , KINS 253 , KINS 254 , KINS 254 , KINS 257 , KINS 258 , KINS 258  and KINS 260 .

    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a workplace experience/on the job training to connect their classroom academic and instructional learning in the Kinesiology Program and provide them with professional employable skills while being mentored by an employer. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a sense of the standards of professionalism within the various sectors of the field, to include timeliness, responsibility, professional dress, and effective communication.
    2. Articulate long-term career goals and intent to pursue national certification exam and/or credentials required for employability in the industry upon completion of work-based learning experience hours.

Language Interpreting

  
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    INTP 101 Introduction to Language Interpreting (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to interpreting as a career. Outlines the role and responsibilities of interpreters, the various interpreting environments, and the significance of cultural factors in the field.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and explain the role and function of the interpreter.
    2. Differentiate the modes of interpreting and the factors that make each appropriate to a particular situation.
    3. Explore the settings (government agencies, institutions, etc.) in which interpreters work.
    4. Describe the contracting and employment of interpreters and the types of agencies with whom they contract.
    5. Identify various types of licensing and certification of interpreters and the requirements for each.
    6. Discuss primary points of the ethics of interpreting.
    7. Recognize and examine common issues of cross-cultural communication that arise in an interpreting situation.
    8. Explore the significance of regional variations and idioms in interpreting.
    Describe cultural beliefs and influences, particularly those specific to the interpreter’s languages that may have an impact on an interpreting assignment and discuss appropriate handling of the situation.
  
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    INTP 105 Ethics of Interpreting (3 credits)



    Course Description
    An exploration of the ethics, protocols, and legal aspects of interpreting, including certification requirements. Intended for those pursuing a career in interpreting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the maintenance of client confidentiality in context.
    2. Explain the need for and maintain accuracy in all interpreting assignments.
    3. Adhere to proper protocols.
    4. Apply appropriate rules and codes of conduct prescribed by specific agencies, e.g. Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Interpreters’ Code of Ethics.
    5. Apply relevant Washington state law.
    6. Identify and describe types of interpreter certification and the relevant continuing education.
    7. Create a plan for obtaining and maintaining certification.
  
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    INTP 110 Foundations of Interpreting Skills (5 credits)



    Prerequisite INTP 101 (may be taken concurrently).

    Course Description
    Introduction to interpreting skills. Students develop intralingual skills and explore linguistic structures that support the complex process of interpretation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and explain the process of interpretation and the significance of each step of the interpretation process.
    2. Create a glossary of unfamiliar lexical items and usages, and use contents to expand vocabulary.
    3. Listen actively for comprehension and retention.
    4. Analyze written and spoken text for lexical units; grammar-based meaning; and spatial, physical and causal relationships.
    5. Remember 2-3 sentence utterances for repetition and paraphrase.
    6. Take effective notes to aid memory in consecutive interpreting.
    7. Read aloud clearly and audibly.
    8. Paraphrase written and spoken non-technical texts extemporaneously.
    9. Shadow a speaker in an extended, but not technical, utterance.
    10. Identify errors and their causes in own interpreting work.
    11. Develop a self-improvement plan based on error analysis.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 050 Basic Mathematics (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Operations and applications with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Order of operations. Converting among number representations; placing numbers in order. Basic applications, including use of percent and geometry. Study strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Whole numbers
    a. Read and write whole numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) with whole numbers.
    c. Calculate squares and cubes, and square roots of perfect squares.
    d. Perform multistep calculations with whole numbers using the correct order of operations.
    e. Perform techniques of rounding with whole numbers.
    f. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, and subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.

    2. Fractions
    a. Perform the four basic operations with positive fractions.
    b. Convert between improper fraction and mixed numbers.

    3. Decimals
    a. Read and write decimal numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations with positive decimals.
    c. Perform techniques of rounding with decimal numbers.
    d. Convert between decimal and percent representations.

    4. Integers
    a. Perform the four basic operations with integers.

    5. Inter-classification
    a. Convert numbers between decimal, fraction, and percent representations.
    b. Place whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers in numerical order.

    6. Applications
    a. Solve a variety of application problems.
    b. Solve basic applications with percents.
    c. Determine the perimeter and area of rectangles and triangles. Determine the volume of a rectangular box. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).

    7. Study Strategies
    a. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    b. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    8. General Skills
    a. Perform all arithmetic operations without use of a calculator.
    b. Use correct order of operations for calculations.
    c. Estimate solutions to problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    d. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    e. Clearly communicate solution processes.
    f. Use a computer to engage in some of the course activities.
  
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    MATH 051 Fundamentals of Arithmetic (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Solve problems including percent, ratio and proportion, measurement, and geometric figures. Introduction to signed numbers, measures of center, and interpretation of basic data graphs.

    Student Outcomes
    Numbers and Operations with Numbers (Content A)
    1. Read and write whole and decimal numbers and identify digit place values. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    2. Perform the four basic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) with whole numbers without a calculator including using the correct order of operations.
    3. Perform the four basic operations with any rational numbers expressed in fractional notation without a calculator.
    4. Perform the four basic operations with the rational numbers expressed in decimal notation without a calculator.
    5. Convert between rational numbers expressed in fractional notation and decimal notation without a calculator.
    6. Perform techniques of rounding with decimal numbers.

    Percents, Ratios, and Proportions, Basic Geometry (Content B, C, and D)
    7. Solve basic problems involving ratios, proportions and percents without a calculator.
    8. Solve a variety of application problems, including the following: Solve application problems involving percents including simple interest formula. Solve application problems involving proportions, such as scale drawings or geometric similarity.
    9. Determine the perimeter and area of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine the volume of rectangular boxes and cylinders. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).

    Signed Numbers (Content E)
    10. Place signed numbers in numerical order.
    11. Perform the four basic operations with the signed numbers without a calculator.

    Measurement (Content F)
    12. Determine the appropriate measuring unit within the U.S. and the Metric systems.
    13. Convert between units of measurement within the U.S. and the Metric systems.

    Statistics (Content G)
    14. Create graphs to represent data and interpret data represented in basic statistical graphs.
    15. Calculate mean, median, and mode given data.

    Writing
    16. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.

    General Skills
    17. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
    18. Communicate methods of solutions and solutions to problems for the clarity of the receiver, including units as appropriate.
    19. Estimate solutions to a variety of problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    20. Perform basic operations with a calculator.
  
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    MATH 054 Beginning Algebra (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score, or MATH 050  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Operations with fractions, decimals, percents, and signed numbers. Simplify algebraic expressions. Solve linear equations. Solve a variety of application problems. Square roots, exponents, and coordinate graphing. Determine area, perimeter, and volume. Calculate statistical measures of center and interpret graphs.

    Student Outcomes
    Note: All the outcomes should be performed without a calculator, except as noted.

    Numbers and operations (content A, B, C)
    1. Perform the four basic operations with positive and negative rational numbers expressed in fractional notation and decimal form. Calculate with exponents.
    2. Perform multi-step calculations with rational numbers using the correct order of operations. Place rational numbers in order.
    3. Compute with percents, and interpret results.
    4. Find square roots of perfect squares without a calculator, and use a calculator to find approximate square roots.
    5. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.


    Algebraic expressions – simplification and evaluation (content D, E)
    6. Manipulate basic algebraic expressions, using correct order of operations and combining like terms.
    7. Perform the four basic operations with algebraic fractions (for fractions that have monomial numerator and denominator).
    8. Simplify algebraic exponential expressions involving positive integer exponents.
    9. Evaluate algebraic expressions and formulas without a calculator.
    10. Use a calculator to evaluate numeric expressions, including those with parentheses and exponents.

    Solving linear equations (content F)
    11. Distinguish between algebraic expressions and equations.
    12. Solve one-variable linear equations, including those with grouping symbols and with the variable on both sides.

    Applications (content G)
    13. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions.
    14. Solve a variety of application problems, including the following: Solve application problems involving percents including percent increase/decrease problems and simple interest formula. Solve application problems involving proportions, such as scale drawings or geometric similarity.

    Geometry (content H)
    15. Determine the area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine the volume of rectangular boxes and cylinders. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).
    16. Measure lengths using units of the metric system and the U.S. system.
    17. Convert between units of measure within the metric system and the U.S. system.

    Statistics (content I)
    18. Given data, calculate the mean, median, and mode.
    19. Create graphs to represent data and interpret data represented in statistical graphs.

    Coordinate Graphs (content J)
    20. Graph points on a coordinate axes system. Identify points graphed on a coordinate system, including axes intercepts.
    21. Graph linear equations by plotting points.

    Study Strategies (content K)
    22. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    23. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    General Skills
    24. Estimate solutions to a variety of problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    25. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    26. Clearly communicate solution processes.
  
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    MATH 060 Introduction to Algebra (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or MATH 051 with a grade of at least 3.0 or MATH 054 with a grade of 2.0 or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Basic operations with numeric and polynomial expressions solving linear equations, linear inequalities, systems of linear equations, and quadratic equations linear graphs applications.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Number Systems and Operations (Review topic)
    a. Distinguish between the different Number Systems (Real, Rational, Integers, Whole, Natural, Irrational).
    b. Perform basic operations with real numbers: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, raising to powers, and evaluating square roots.
    c. Evaluate numeric expressions using order of operations.

    2. Algebraic Expressions
    a. Simplify polynomial expressions using addition, subtraction, multiplication, division by monomials, combining like terms, and the order of operations.
    b. Evaluate and simplify expressions involving integer exponents, including negative exponents and scientific notation.
    c. Evaluate algebraic expressions with multiple variables.
    d. Factor polynomial expressions using the techniques of: factoring out a greatest common factor factoring by grouping, factoring trinomials of the form ax2 + bx + c and factoring the difference of squares.
    e. Distinguish between algebraic expressions and equations.

    3. Linear Equations and Inequalities in One Variable
    a. Solve linear equations in a single variable.
    b. Solve linear and compound inequalities and represent solutions graphically.
    c. Solve linear formulas for a specified variable, including geometric formulas.

    4. Graphs of Linear Equations
    a. Identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    b. Graph two-variable linear equations by plotting points and by using slopes and intercepts.
    c. Find and interpret slopes and intercepts given a linear graph or a linear equation.

    5. Equations in Two Variables
    a. Determine the equation of a line given sufficient information.
    b. Solve systems of linear equations in two variables graphically and algebraically using substitution and elimination.

    6. Applications
    a. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions.
    b. Obtain and synthesize relevant information and use appropriate formulas in order to set up and solve application problems involving linear equations.
    c. Apply geometric formulas to find the perimeter, circumference, area, and volume of basic geometric figures.
    d. Interpret solutions of application problems in the context of the problem and evaluate the reasonableness of the solutions. Write solution in complete sentences, including units.
    e. Solve applications using systems of equations.

    7. Quadratic equations
    a. Solve quadratic equations by factoring.
    b. Solve applications using factorable quadratic equations.

    8. General Content
    a. Perform all the work of the course without a calculator, except as noted below.
    b. Use a calculator to: find decimal approximations of square roots, evaluate exponents, evaluate expressions by using the order of operations correctly, and evaluate numerical solutions to application problems.
    c. Read and interpret graphs, charts and tables.
    d. Link algebraic, numeric, verbal, and graphical solutions with each other, as appropriate.
    e. Use estimation to approximate solutions and to determine the reasonableness of solutions to problems.
    f. Write solutions in the context of the problem in complete sentences, including units. Use mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly.
    g. Clearly communicate methods of solutions.
    h. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
  
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    MATH 077 Prep for College Math (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An exploration of mathematics concepts and activities intended to increase the exposure, abilities, confidence and motivation to learn further mathematics. Topics include Integer arithmetic, algebra, including formulas, solving equations, graphing, exponents and square roots, dimensional analysis, experiential activities, math explorations.

    Student Outcomes
    A.  Students will demonstrate the ability to use mathematical skills (e.g. computation, use of mathematical symbols, using formulas, equations and algorithms, creating and analyzing graphical representation of data) that support mathematical understanding. 


    B.  Students will complete experiential activities to increase confidence with, and understanding of, math concepts that are frequently discussed abstractly in math and science texts.”


    C.  Students will analyze real-world situations incorporating any appropriate math and effectively communicate the results. 


    D.  Students will complete inspirational activities to broaden their view of math, mathematicians, scientists, or contemporary problems researchers are trying to solve.
  
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    MATH 091 Math Review (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Math review

  
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    MATH 096 Intermediate Algebra in Context (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement, or MATH 054  with at least a 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course integrates numeracy, proportional reasoning, algebraic skills, and functional reasoning. Students will represent quantitative relationships in multiple ways in order to solve problems from a variety of authentic contexts. Linear and exponential functions, along with logarithms and radicals will be studied and applied. Modeling and interpreting quantitative data is emphasized.

    Student Outcomes
    Numeracy
    1. Demonstrate operation sense by communicating in words and symbols the effects of operations on numbers. Apply the correct order of operations in evaluating expressions and formulas.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the magnitude of real numbers represented in many forms (fractions, decimals, scientific notation, square roots of numbers) by ordering and comparing them in mathematical and real-world contexts.
    3. Estimate results in appropriate contexts, using appropriate precision; use estimation to detect errors and evaluate the reasonableness of answers.
    4. Use dimensional analysis to convert units, rates, and ratios from any given units to other units. Include conversions among and between U.S. and metric units using a variety of metric prefixes.
    5. Demonstrate measurement sense by determining the sizes of objects and angles using measurements and estimation. Determine perimeter, area, surface area, and volume using appropriate units in both the U.S. and metric systems.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the distribution of data and various mathematical summaries of data (measures of central tendency and of variation).
    7. Read, interpret, and make decisions based upon data from tables and graphical displays such as line graphs, bar graphs, scatterplots, pie charts, and histograms. Given data, choose an appropriate type of graphical display and create it using scales appropriate to the application.

    Proportional Reasoning
    8. Recognize a proportional relationship from verbal, numeric, and visual representations. Link and create verbal, numeric, visual and symbolic representations of the relationship.
    9. Compare proportional relationships represented in different ways, considering units when doing so.
    10. Apply quantitative reasoning strategies to solve real-world problems with proportional relationships using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents as appropriate.

    Algebraic Skills and Reasoning
    11. Distinguish between variables and constants. Represent real-world problem situations using variables and constants. Construct equations to represent relationships between unknown quantities.
    12. Simplify algebraic expressions by using the distributive property, combining like terms, and factoring out a greatest common factor.
    13. Evaluate formulas with multiple variables in a variety of contexts, including science, statistics, geometry, and financial math. Solve simple formulas for a specified variable.
    14. Distinguish between expressions and equations and apply appropriate methods to each.
    15. Solve linear equations in one variable, including problems involving the distributive property and fractions.
    16. Construct inequalities to represent relationships, solve simple and compound inequalities in one variable, represent solutions using interval notation, and interpret solutions in the context of the situation.
    17. Use basic exponent rules to simplify expressions, including those with negative exponents.
    18. Solve basic power equations of the form xn = b using radicals.
    19. Use the Pythagorean Theorem when appropriate in problem situations.

    Functional Reasoning
    20. Translate problems from a variety of contexts into mathematical representation and vice versa (linear, exponential, simple quadratics).
    21. Describe the behavior of common types of functions using words, algebraic symbols, graphs, and tables. Include descriptions of the dependent and independent variables.
    22. Identify when a linear model is reasonable for a given situation and, when appropriate, formulate a linear model. In the context of the situation interpret the slope and intercepts and determine the reasonable domain and range.
    23. Determine the exponential function for a situation when given an initial value and either the growth/decay rate or a second function value. Interpret the initial value and growth rate of an exponential function. Include compound interest as one application.
    24. Translate exponential statements to equivalent logarithmic statements, interpret logarithmic scales, and use logarithms to solve basic exponential equations.
    25. Use functional models to make predictions and solve problems.

    General Skills
    26. Extract relevant information from complex scenarios. Obtain any necessary additional information from outside sources. Synthesize the information in order to solve problems and make decisions.
    27. Identify which mathematical skills to use and then apply them in diverse scenarios and contexts.
    28. Clearly communicate solution processes. Write solutions in the context of the problem in complete sentences, including units. Use mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly.
    29. Use technology appropriately including calculators and computers.
  
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    MATH 098 Intermediate Algebra for Precalculus (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score, instructor permission, or completion of MATH 077 or MATH 096 or equivalent.

    Course Description
    Algebraic skills, concepts, and applications​ needed for precalculus, including quadratic, polynomial, rational, and radical expressions and equations, and systems of linear equations.

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Evaluate and relate functions expressed as graphs, tables, or formulas, including using standard function notation, state the domain and range of these functions, and identify and graph the basic toolkit functions.
    2.  Manipulate and simplify quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational expressions, using appropriate properties and algebraic techniques.
    3.  Solve quadratic, radical, and rational equations, systems of linear equations, and formulas, using appropriate properties and algebraic techniques.
    4.  Solve application problems, interpret solutions, evaluate their reasonableness and make decisions by extracting relevant information from a scenario, obtaining any necessary additional information from outside sources, identifying and applying the appropriate techniques.
    5. Clearly communicate solution processes, including writing solutions in the context of the problem, including units, using mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly, and using complete sentences when appropriate.
  
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    MATH 111 College Math for Early Childhood Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (not all four-year colleges accept this as a QSR)
    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096  or MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement test score and eligible for ENGL& 101  .

    Course Description
    A course for early childhood educators providing the mathematical foundations for quantitative concepts appropriate for children from birth through Grade 3. Topics include patterns, sequencing, number systems and computation, models for operations, problem-solving strategies, functions, geometry, measurement, and basic concepts of statistics and probability. Methods used are interactive, activity-based, and guided by national and state mathematics education standards. Emphasizes conceptual understanding, connections among topics, and communication of mathematical thinking.

    Student Outcomes
    Problem solving
    1. Apply problem-solving strategies to problem situations, such as the use of models, pattern recognition, working backwards, “guess, check, and revise”, and organized tables.

    Patterns and sequences
    2. Recognize and describe patterns, such as those found in nature, sounds (music, rhythms), pictures, and objects. Create new patterns.
    3. Create sequences of objects or numbers. Recognize and extend existing sequences, including arithmetic and geometric numeric sequences.

    Numeration systems and operations with numbers
    4. Discuss the components and properties of our base 10 number system, another base such as 5, and ancient numeration systems, including symbols used, place value, methods of computation, and advantages and disadvantages of the system.
    5. Describe and apply a variety of cognitive models and concrete materials (manipulatives) to explore, illustrate, and justify quantitative relationships and computational methods.
    6. Apply properties of the real number system to justify reasoning and to solve mathematical and real-world application problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and proportions.
    7. Use number sense, estimation, and reasoning to evaluate the reasonableness of solutions.

    Algebraic expressions, relations, functions, coordinate plane
    8. Solve mathematical and realistic contextual problems by applying algebraic skills using expressions, formulas, linear equations, and inequalities.
    9. Use two-dimensional coordinate geometry to specify locations and describe relationships.
    10. Explore and analyze patterns, relationships, and functions using tables, graphs, and equations.
    11. Describe and analyze rates of change including slope, rate of growth, and speed.

    Geometric shapes, measurement, area, perimeter, volume
    12. Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes. Apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
    13. Build and manipulate representations of two- and three-dimensional objects using concrete models and drawings.
    14. Describe relationships among two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes, including congruence and similarity. Use proportions to solve problems involving similar triangles.
    15. Apply geometric concepts and modeling to solve mathematical and real-world problems.
    16. Recognize measurable attributes of objects. Explore and apply various units and systems of measurement, including nonstandard, U.S., and metric (SI).
    17. Select and use appropriate measurement units, techniques, and tools to find length, perimeter, area, volume, capacity, and weight. Compare and contrast shapes and objects by size.
    18. Determine area, perimeter, and volume of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes.

    Statistics and probability
    19. Design simple investigations and collect and organize data.
    20. Display data in a variety of ways including graphs and charts.
    21. Determine and analyze measures of center for sets of data (mean, median, mode).
    22. Interpret data by observing patterns and departures from patterns in data displays. Discuss results.
    23. Calculate the empirical probabilities of events after collecting relevant data.
    24. Estimate the theoretical probability of simple events and the likelihood of real world events.

    Connections and Communication
    25. Connect mathematical ideas to the real world.
    26. Recognize how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole.
    27. Communicate mathematical thinking coherently and clearly (using correct vocabulary) to peers, teachers, and others by, for example, leading activities involving the concepts of this course or presenting lessons to the class using appropriate materials.
    28. Collaborate with classmates in order to achieve some of the learning outcomes of this course.
    29. Relate national and state mathematics education standards for Pre-K to Grade 3 to mathematical content of this course.
  
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    MATH 114 Applied Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0, or placement test score above MATH 098.

    Course Description
    Linear, quadratic, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions and their applications. Interpretation and display of information using rectangular, polar, and logarithmic coordinate systems. Right triangle and unit circle trigonometry. Vector operations using real and complex numbers. Solutions to systems of linear equations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform basic algebraic manipulation with polynomials, rational expressions, geometric formulas, and exponential and logarithmic expressions.
    2. Solve linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric equations.
    3. Interpret, in the context of the problem, a variety of data in table and in graphical form.
    4. Perform unit analysis and unit conversions within and between measurement systems. (e.g., US - SI, degrees - radians, Kelvin - Rankine - Farenheit - Celsius)
    5. Perform basic operations with scientific notation and engineering notations and use significant figures appropriately.
    6. Solve systems of equations using Cramer’s Rule and matrix algebra.
    7. Display and interpret graphical information for the functions listed in 1.
    8. Find solutions to vector problems graphically and algebraically.
    9. Apply metric prefixes (Kilo, Hecta, Deca, deci, centi, milli) appropriately to complete problems.
    10. Display and interpret graphical information in rectangular, polar, and logarithmic coordinate systems.
    11. Use the appropriate formula(s) to solve right triangles.
    12. Use law of cosines and law of sines appropriately to solve non-right triangles.
    13. Apply complex number using unit-circle trigonometry.
    14. Perform the basic (add, subtract, multiply, and divide) mathematical operations on complex numbers.
    15. Perform vector operations with complex numbers.
    16. Link algebraic, numeric, and graphical solutions with each other.
    17. Solve and analyze application problems that involve concepts covered in this course and in previous courses.
    18. Communicate methods of solutions and solutions to problems for the clarity of the
    receiver.
    19. Interpret the solution in the context of the problem and evaluate the reasonableness of the solution.
    20. Participate actively and responsibly in all course activities.
    21. Use technology appropriately to solve problems.
  
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    MATH 147 Business Precalculus (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 147/MATH 156 Finite Mathematics

    Prerequisite MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0, or placement test score above MATH 098.

    Course Description
    Linear, polynomial and rational function models. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Mathematics of finance, matrices, linear programming, and set operations.

    Student Outcomes
    Rate of change (content A, B)
    1. Calculate the rate of change of a linear function numerically, graphically, and symbolically.
    2. Interpret the rate of change verbally and graphically, including interpretation in business applications.
    3. Calculate and simplify the difference quotient for various types of functions including linear and quadratic functions.
    Functions (content C, D)
    4. Evaluate a function given as a graph, table, or formula, particularly using standard function notation f(x),including piecewise functions.
    5. Evaluate and simplify composite functions.
    Linear functions, equations, and inequalities (content A, B, C, D)
    6. Determine the equation of a line given various information (two points, a point and the slope, a point and some information about the slope such as a parallel or perpendicular line).
    7. Sketch the graph of a line given a point and the slope, or two points, with and without a calculator.
    8. Graph piecewise linear function
    9. Solve linear equations for a specified variable.
    10. Determine the linear regression for a given set of data that is approximately linear and interpret its accuracy with a calculator.
    11. Solve linear inequalities and show the solution graphically, symbolically (inequality notation, interval notation, or set notation), and verbally.


    Polynomial and rational functions (content A, C, D, E)
    12. Determine the domain and range of polynomial and rational functions, with and without a calculator.
    13. Determine zeroes (x-intercepts), the vertex, and axis of symmetry for quadratic functions, and use this information along with the y-intercept to sketch the graph without a calculator.
    14. Determine the quadratic function if given various items of information (x-intercepts and a point, or vertex and a point) with and without a calculator.
    15. Sketch the graph of a polynomial, using all available information: degree, sign of the leading term, zeroes (x-intercepts), the y-intercept, and the multiplicity of repeated zeroes.
    16. Determine vertical and horizontal asymptotes, zeroes (x-intercepts), open circles, and y-intercepts for rational functions and use this information along with test points to sketch the graph.
    17. Solve polynomial and rational inequalities and show the solution graphically and symbolically (inequality notation, interval notation, or set notation).

    Exponential and Logarithmic functions (content A, D, F)
    18. Graph exponential functions and correctly interpret graphs of exponential functions.
    19. Solve problems involving exponential growth and decay functions with and without a calculator.
    20. Use the relationship between exponential functions and logarithms to rewrite an exponential in logarithmic form and vice versa.
    21. Use properties of logarithms (exponent property, sum and difference properties) to solve exponential equations without a calculator.

    Applications (content G)
    22. Solve a variety of business applications including the following:
    - Break-even analysis for linear revenue, cost, and profit functions
    - Equilibrium points for linear or quadratic or rational demand and supply functions,
    - Finding a linear cost, revenue, or profit function given information such as marginal cost, fixed cost, price per item,
    - Finding maximum profit, maximum revenue, or minimum cost, for quadratic profit/revenue/cost functions.
    23. Solve a variety of application problems using rational, polynomial, logarithmic, and exponential equations and inequalities involving business, and topics chosen from health, social and natural sciences.

    Matrices (content G)
    24. Use row operations and the Gauss-Jordan Method to solve linear systems.
    25. Perform basic matrix operations to include adding, subtracting, and multiplying matrices with and without a calculator.

    Linear Programming (content H)
    26. Optimize the objective function, consider constraints, and use graphical techniques.
    27. Set up linear programming problems (objective functions and constraint inequalities) from applications.

    Set Operations (content J)
    28. Determine the complement, intersection, and union of two or more sets.
    29. Use Venn diagrams to solve application problems involving business, health, social and natural sciences data.

    Finance (content K)
    30. Use finance formulas to compute future value, present value, and compound interest (including annually, quarterly, weekly, and daily).
    31. Compute future value, present value, simple interest, compound interest (including annually, quarterly, weekly, and daily), continuous interest, and amortization schedules for a variety of finance problems.

    Writing
    32. Use appropriate units when solving application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in sentences, when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.

    General Skills
    33. Communicate methods of solution and solutions to problems clearly to their intended audience.
    34. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
  
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    MATH 205 Linear Algebra (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 153  or MATH& 163  with a grade of 2.0 or higher (MATH 224  or MATH& 264  recommended) or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Applications and techniques of Linear Algebra, including solving systems of equations, vector spaces, matrix operations, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and characteristic polynomials. Introduction to appropriate technology and elementary proofs.

    Student Outcomes
    The student should be able to:

    Gaussian Elimination component
    1. Row reduce a matrix to reduced row echelon form by hand.
    2. Use Gaussian elimination to find all solutions to a system of linear algebraic equations.
    3. Use systems of equations to effectively model real world problems from engineering and the sciences and interpret their solutions in the context of the problem.

    Matrix component
    4. Add, subtract, multiply, and re-scale matrices without technology.
    5. Compute the inverse of a matrix using Gaussian elimination without technology.
    6. Use the inverse of a matrix to solve a system of equations without technology.
    7. Compute the transpose of a matrix without technology.
    8. Utilize the properties of the determinant in solving problems in linear algebra.
    9. Calculate determinants without technology.

    Vector Spaces component
    10. Define and understand the concept of a vector space.
    11. Prove whether or not a given set with given operations is a vector space, including Euclidean spaces with standard and non-standard operations, polynomial spaces, function spaces, matrix spaces.
    12. Determine whether or not a subset of a given vector space is a subspace.
    13. Compute the span of a given subset of a vector space.
    14. Determine whether or not a given subset of a vector space is linearly independent.
    15. Define and understand the concept of a basis for a vector space.
    16. Determine whether or not a given subset is a basis, including the standard bases for Euclidean space, polynomial spaces, and matrix spaces.
    17. Determine the dimension of Euclidean, polynomial, and matrix spaces.
    18. Compute the rank and nullspace of a matrix, including finding appropriate bases.
    19. Compute the coordinates of an element of a vector space relative to a given basis.
    20. Compute the transition matrix for coordinates relative to two bases.



    Linear Transformations component
    21. State the definition of a linear transformation and determine whether a given transformation is linear or not.
    22. View examples from calculus as linear transformations, including preparations for differential equations.
    23. Compute the kernel and range of a linear transformation, including finding appropriate bases, including for linear transformations not given by a matrix.
    24. Find the matrix representation of a linear transformation relative to standard and non-standard bases.
    25. Construct matrix representations of geometric transformations such as reflections, dilations, contractions, and reflections in Euclidean space.
    Eigenvalues component
    26. Visualize the geometric consequences of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix.
    27. Compute the eigenvalues of a matrix via the characteristic polynomial.
    28. Compute the eigenvectors of a matrix via the nullspace.
    29. Diagonalize a matrix.
    30. Apply diagonalization to solve a variety of problems from mathematics, the sciences, and engineering, including the Fibonacci numbers, stochastic processes, and Markov processes.
    General Content
    31. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    32. Compute basic examples and concepts by hand.
    33. Write clear, coherent, and correct mathematical proofs at a basis level, including construction of counter examples and proof by contradiction.
    34. Utilize computer algebra and graphical systems to solve problems, understand concepts, and model physical problems, as appropriate.
  
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    MATH 224 Multivariate Calculus (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 153  with a grade of 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Functions of several variables. Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and their applications. Vector analysis including vector fields, line and surface integrals, Green’s theorem, Stokes’ theorem, and the Divergence theorem.

    Student Outcomes
    The student should be able to:

    Functions of Several Variables component
    1. Evaluate functions of several variables numerically, graphically, and symbolically.
    2. Graph functions of several variables utilizing technology as appropriate.
    3. Compute limits of functions of several variables.
    4. Determine the domain and continuity of a function of several variables.

    Partial Derivatives component
    5. Utilize the definition of the partial derivative of a function of several variables to solve rate of change problems.
    6. Compute partial derivatives symbolically utilizing the basic techniques from single variable calculus.
    7. Determine an equation of the tangent place to a surface defined by a graph of a function, by an implicit equation, and by a parametric equation.
    8. Compute partial derivatives via the chain rule and through implicit differentiation.
    9. Locate and test extrema using the Second Derivative Test.
    10. Utilize Lagrange multipliers to optimize functions of several variables given one or more constraints.
    11. Apply directional derivatives to solve rate of change problems in arbitrary directions. Determine the direction of maximal and minimal change of a function of several variables.
    12. Apply techniques of partial derivatives to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    Multiple Integrals component
    13. Construct the double integral of a function of two variables as the limit of a Riemann sum.
    14. Compute double integrals of functions of two variables over rectangle regions by identifying the relevant solid and computing its volume.
    15. Compute multiple integrals over general regions whose boundaries are parameterized by curves or surfaces, utilizing the basic techniques from single variable calculus.
    16. Compute double and triple integrals in polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.
    17. Compute the surface area of a parameterized surface via a double integral.
    18. Describe and construct basic transformations and compute their Jacobians.
    19. Apply the Change of Variables theorem to compute multiple integrals.
    20. Apply techniques of multiple integrals to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.


    Vector Analysis component
    21. Draw vector fields in two and three dimensions.
    22. Qualitatively determine characteristics of vector fields, including periodic orbits and singularities.
    23. Compute the line integral of a function and of a vector field along a parameterized curve.
    24. Determine the work done by a force field in moving a mass-less particle along a parameterized trajectory.
    25. Determine whether a vector field is conservative or not and construct a potential if one exists.
    26. Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals.
    27. Apply Green’s theorem to line integrals around closed paths.
    28. Compute the curl of a vector field and describe its implications.
    29. Construct and compute surface integrals of vector fields.
    30. Determine the net rate of flow of a fluid through a parameterized membrane.
    31. Use Stokes’ theorem to compute surface and triple integrals.
    32. Compute the divergence of a vector field and apply the divergence theorem to compute surface and triple integrals.
    33. Apply techniques of vector analysis to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    General Content
    34. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    35. Utilize computer algebra and graphical systems to solve problems, visualize abstract concepts, and model physical problems, as appropriate.
  
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    MATH 238 Differential Equations (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 153  or MATH& 163  with a grade of 2.0 or higher (MATH 205  recommended) or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course covers first and second order differential equations with applications to the sciences and engineering, an introduction to higher order equations, Laplace transforms, and systems of linear differential equations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Solve first order, second order, higher order, and systems of differential equations using all the analytic, graphical, and numeric techniques described in the course content, including use of the Laplace transform.
    2. Model and solve diverse problems in sciences and engineering using differential equations.
    3. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems and basic mathematical proofs.
  
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    MATH& 107 Math in Society (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 107 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096  or MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement test score.

    Course Description
    Contemporary mathematics applied to a variety of fields. Instructor-chosen topics will focus on graphical- and formula-derived solutions, statistics, applied problems, and communicating solutions. Topics may include management science, statistics, social choice, patterns, and financial applications.

    Student Outcomes
    1) Read complex scenarios and extract from them information relevant to solving problems. Obtain any necessary additional information from outside sources.

    2) Identify a strategy for solving problems in diverse scenarios and contexts

    3) Solve problems using a variety of quantitative and mathematical techniques, including:
    a) Solve multi-step problems using proportional reasoning approaches (some examples: dimensional analysis, use rates and ratios, scale shapes, convert square and cubic units, calculate percents)

    b) Create and analyze graphical representations of data to summarize data, make comparisons, and visualize distributions.

    c) Model and solve problems using graphical methods (some examples: estimate solutions using graphs of functions, use graphs to analyze network flows such as Euler and Hamilton Circuits, use graphs to model scheduling problems, use Venn diagrams to analyze set interactions, create system dynamics models)

    d) Solve problems using algorithms (some examples: build amortization schedules, execute voting theory algorithms, execute fair division algorithms, execute network flow algorithms)

    e) Solve problems using formulas or equations (some examples: use financial formulas, use probability formulas, build and use growth models)

    4) Determine the reasonableness and implications of mathematical solutions, and recognize the limitations of the methods used.

    5) Communicate mathematical processes effectively by showing appropriate steps or procedures.

    6) Communicate contextual solutions effectively by including units or writing a phrase, complete sentence, or paragraph as appropriate.

    7) Interpret results in context of the problem, describe their implications, and/or use the results to make decisions.

    8) Solve complex, open-ended problems utilizing elements from all the above outcomes within a single scenario.
  
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    MATH& 131 Math for Elementary Education 1 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH& 171

    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096   or MATH 098   or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement test score and eligible for ENGL& 101   and READ 101 .

    Course Description
    The first of two courses for prospective elementary teachers focusing on the mathematics underlying modern elementary school math. Topics include: number systems, models for operations, problem-solving techniques, and a variety of instructional approaches. Emphasizes deep conceptual understanding of content, connections among topics, and communication of mathematical ideas. Appropriate technology is incorporated.

    Student Outcomes
    Problem solving and Reasoning  
    1. Apply problem-solving strategies and/or mathematical reasoning to interpret and solve math problems, illustrate and justify quantitative relationships and computational methods and evaluate the reasonableness and accuracy of potential solutions to problems.
    Structure & Operations with Real Numbers
    2. Explain and use the mathematical structure and properties of the set of real numbers and arithmetic operations to solve problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and proportions.   
    Algebraic Expressions, Equations & Functions
    3. Use symbolic algebra to represent and solve applied problems and investigate how the variables interact and are represented graphically. 
    Communication of Mathematical Ideas and Reasoning  
    4. Clearly communicate mathematical thinking, strategies and solutions both orally and in writing using proper mathematical notation and vocabulary, and evaluate that of others during independent and collaborative activities. 
    Connections and Context  
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of historical and cross-cultural contributions to mathematics and to the development of number systems.  
    6. Analyze and explain how mathematical ideas connect to one another and to real-life topics.
    Instructional Methodology  
    7. Discuss and apply relevant national and state mathematical standards and appropriate instructional methods observed in K-8 classrooms​.
    8. Use appropriate technology and concrete materials (manipulatives) for problem solving, demonstrating concepts, and exploration.  
    9. Investigate and explain the effects of math anxiety on learners and the learning environment in an elementary classroom and discuss strategies to address anxiety/avoidance in oneself and others.
  
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    MATH& 132 Math for Elementary Education 2 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH& 172 and MATH& 173

    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096  or MATH 098   or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement test score and eligible for ENGL& 101  .

    Course Description
    This is the second of two courses for prospective elementary teachers focusing on the foundation underlying modern elementary school math. Topics include geometry, measurement, probability, and descriptive statistics. This course emphasizes deep conceptual understanding of content, connections among topics, and communication of mathematical ideas. Appropriate technology is incorporated.

    Student Outcomes
    Geometric Concepts (A, B, C)
    1. Apply geometric properties, along with spatial reasoning, to develop mathematical arguments about geometric relationships and solve mathematical problems.
    Measurement Concepts and Applications (D, E)
    2. Select and use appropriate techniques and tools to find measurable attributes of objects, develop and use formulas for measurable attributes of objects, and apply appropriate units and systems of measurement to solve problems.  
    Descriptive Statistics (F, G, H, I, L)
    3. Design simple investigations to collect, display, analyze and interpret data in order to make inferences and predictions.
    Probability (J, K, L)
    4. Apply basic probability theory to solve problems and make and test conjectures about the results of experiments and simulations.
    Mathematical Communication (M)
    5. Clearly communicate mathematical thinking and solutions both orally and in writing and analyze and assess the mathematical thinking, strategies, and solutions of others.
    Connections and Context (N)
    6. Discuss historical and cross-cultural contributions to topics in geometry and
    statistics.
    7. Analyze and explain how mathematical ideas connect to one another and to
    real-life topics.
    Instructional Methodology (O, P)
    8. Relate national and state standards to mathematical content of this course, articulate content and methods of instruction observed in lessons in a K-8 classroom, and demonstrate methods of instruction by developing and presenting activities or lessons involving concepts in this course.
    9. Use appropriate technology and concrete materials (manipulatives) for problem solving, demonstrating concepts, and exploration.
  
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    MATH& 141 Precalculus I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 121 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 098  with at least a 2.0 grade or placement test score above MATH 098 or co-enrolled in MATHL 141.

    Course Description
    Families of functions, their properties, graphs and applications. Functions include: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions and combinations of these. Solve related equations and inequalities. Data analysis, introductory mathematical modeling. Develop competency with a graphing calculator.

    Student Outcomes
    A(1), C. Four Forms of Functions
    1. Solve equations algebraically and graphically involving linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value and square root functions.
    2. Solve linear, polynomial, and rational inequalities algebraically and graphically.
    3. Link verbal, algebraic, numerical, and graphical solutions with each other.
    4. Describe or determine the average rate of change of a function verbally, algebraically, numerically, and graphically.
    5. Describe and determine inverse functions verbally, algebraically, numerically, and graphically.
    6. Perform transformations (shifts, compressions/stretches, and reflections) of functions given in algebraic, numerical, and graphical form for functions such as linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and square root.


    A(2), C. Properties of Functions
    7. Determine domain and range of functions.
    8. Use the properties of logarithms to simplify or evaluate logarithmic expressions.
    9. Determine from a graph or equation if a function is even, odd, or neither.
    10. Determine the properties of polynomial and rational functions such as degree, maximum number of zeros, maximum number of turns, multiplicity of zeros, vertical asymptotes, horizontal asymptotes, and long-run behavior.


    A(3). The Algebra of Functions
    11. Simplify, evaluate, and find the domains of combined functions and composite functions.
    12. Determine the equations of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions algebraically


    A(4). Graphs of Functions
    13. Identify and sketch graphs of the elementary functions (constant, linear, quadratic, third degree and higher polynomial, absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, exponential (base 10 and base e), logarithmic (base 10 and base e)).
    14. Graph elementary functions without a calculator by using methods such as a table of values, slope-intercept, characteristic shape of the function, degree, maximum number of zeros, maximum number of turns, multiplicity of zeros, vertical asymptotes, horizontal asymptotes, and long-run behavior.



    A(5). Applications of Functions
    15. Solve application problems such as optimization or growth and decay using the appropriate elementary functions.
    16. Interpret the solution in the context of the problem and evaluate the reasonableness of the solution.


    B. Analytic Geometry
    17. Calculate the distance and midpoint between two points.
    18. Use the equation of a circle to produce a graph and find the equation of a circle from a graph.


    D. Data analysis and Mathematical modeling
    19. Interpret and analyze linear and non-linear data in numeric, graphic, and algebraic form to develop an appropriate model using technology.

    E. Graphing Calculator
    20. Graph functions on a calculator and analyze them using an appropriate window.
    21. Find minima, maxima, zeros, long-range behavior, and asymptotes using a graphing calculator.


    F. General Content
    22. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    23. Communicate the difference between an exact and an approximate solution and determine which is more appropriate for a given problem.
  
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    MATH& 142 Precalculus II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 141  with a grade of at least 2.0, suitable placement test score, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Families of trigonometric functions, their inverses, properties, graphs, and applications. Trigonometric equations and identities. Laws of sines and cosines. Polar coordinates and graphs. Parametric equations. Elementary vector operations.

    Student Outcomes
    A. Angles and Radian Measure
    1. Convert radians to degrees and vice versa.
    2. Solve applied problems involving arc length and linear/angular speed.
    3. Determine or calculate the reference angle for a given angle and compute or determine angles coterminal with a given angle.

    B. Trigonometric Functions and their Inverses
    4. Apply the definitions of the trigonometric functions in terms of right triangles to solve for missing sides and angles of right triangles.
    5. Apply the definitions of the trigonometric functions in terms of the unit circle to state the coordinates of a point on a circle in terms of sine and cosine.
    6. Given a trigonometric function value for an angle, determine the other five trigonometric function values for the same angle without solving for the angle.
    7. Solve applied problems involving right triangle trigonometry.
    8. Recall or derive trigonometric function values for pi/6, pi/4, pi/3, pi/2, and pi as well as angles which are coterminal to these or have these as reference angles without outside reference or calculator.
    9. Apply the law of sines and the law of cosines to solve for unknown sides and angles of triangles and solve applied problems associated with these laws.
    10. Sketch the graphs of trigonometric functions, their transformations, and their inverses and state the domain and range of these functions.
    11. Identify the amplitude, period, midline (vertical shift), and phase shift (or horizontal shift) from a graph, formula, table, or verbal description.
    12. Determine a formula given the graph or table of a standard or transformed trigonometric function.
    13. Use trigonometric functions to model periodic behavior (e.g., ferris wheels, daylight hours, tides, etc.).
    14. Solve applied problems involving harmonic motion including problems with changing amplitude and/or midlines.
    15. Evaluate inverse trigonometric functions involving the basic angles without the use of a calculator, considering the domain and range of these functions.
    16. Convert trigonometric expressions such as cos(arctan x) into algebraic expressions.

    C. Trigonometric Equations and Identities
    17. Solve trigonometric equations for all solutions, providing exact or approximate solutions as appropriate.
    18. Prove trigonometric identities that require multiple steps, other trigonometric identities, and algebraic manipulation.
    19. Apply the addition and subtraction formulas, double angle formulas, and algebraic techniques to solve equations and simplify expressions.

    D. Polar Coordinates and Graphs
    20. Convert polar coordinates into rectangular coordinates and vice versa.
    21. Convert polar equations into rectangular equations and vice versa.
    22. Sketch the graphs of polar equations using a calculator, and sketch the graph of simple polar equations by hand.

    E. Introduction to Vectors
    23. Convert between direction and magnitude and component form of a vector
    24. Perform basic operations with vectors (addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication) graphically and component-wise.
    25. Solve vector application problems such as navigation and resultant forces, including problems where vectors are specified by magnitude and direction.

    F. Parametric Equations
    26. Convert a set of parametric equations into a Cartesian equation and determine a parametrization of a Cartesian equation including identifying the bounds.
    27. Sketch the graphs of parametric equations by hand and by calculator.

    G. General Outcomes
    28.Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    29. Determine whether an exact or approximate solution is more appropriate for a given problem.
    30. Participate actively and responsibly in all course activities.
    31. Link graphical, numeric, and symbolic approaches when interpreting situations and analyzing problems.
  
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    MATH& 146 Introduction to Stats (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 281 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096  or MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the analysis of data using descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics. Topics include: data collection methods; measures of center and variation; graphical presentation of data; probability; binomial and normal distributions; confidence intervals; hypothesis tests of one and two parameters, using the normal, Student-t, and chi-square distributions; linear correlation and regression.

    Student Outcomes
    Descriptive Statistics:

    1. Identify and describe various probabilistic sampling methods.
    2. Identify components of experimental and observational studies.
    3. Identify uses and misuses of statistics.
    4. Construct appropriate representations of data, such as tables (contingency tables and frequency distributions), and graphs (histograms, scatterplots, and boxplots.)
    5. Calculate measures of center (mean, median) with and without technology.
    6. Calculate measures of variation (range, standard deviation, variance) with and without technology.

    Probability:

    7. Calculate probability for simple and compound events using both empirical data and sample spaces.
    8. Use appropriate counting methods (fundamental counting rule, permutations, combinations).
    9. Solve problems using discrete probability distributions, including binomial distributions.
    10. Determine the mean and standard deviation of discrete probability distributions.
    11. Solve problems using continuous distributions, including normal and Student t distributions.
    12. Apply the Central Limit Theorem to calculate the mean and standard deviation of sampling distributions.

    Inferential Statistics:

    13. Determine appropriate sizes of samples.
    14. Generate confidence intervals for means and proportions.
    15. Select and perform hypothesis tests for the mean of one population, proportion of one population, means of two populations, and proportions of two populations.
    16. Use the chi-square distribution to perform a hypothesis test such as goodness-of-fit or test of independence.
    17. Analyze two-variable data using scatter plots, linear correlation coefficients, and linear regression lines, using technology to calculate these items.
    18. Determine whether there is a statistically significant linear correlation between two variables.

    Communication and General Skills:

    19. Communicate the results of data analysis clearly and precisely in both technical and non-technical words, including the use of the following: correct statistical vocabulary; graphical, symbolic, and numeric support for conclusions; indications of the strength and limitations of conclusions.
    20. Engage in experiential learning of key concepts through classroom activities and/or projects.
    21. Draw logical conclusions related to a specific problem by integrating the use of the following: sampling; summary statistics and presentation of data; and either confidence intervals, hypothesis tests or regression analysis as appropriate.
  
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    MATH& 148 Business Calculus (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 157 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 147  (preferred) or MATH& 141  with a grade of at least 2.0 or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Concise course in calculus. Differential and integral calculus of non-trigonometric functions with an emphasis on business and economics applications.

    Student Outcomes
    LIMITS AND CONTINUITY (content B)
    1. Evaluate and interpret limits of functions using numerical, graphical, and algebraic methods with and without a calculator.

    2. Determine the continuity of a function graphically and computationally without the calculator.

    RATES OF CHANGE AND DIFFERENTIATION (content C, D)
    3. Calculate the average rate of change between two points on a function and interpret the answer using the correct units.

    4. Estimate the rate of change of a function at a point using the limit of the appropriate average rates of change with and without the calculator.

    5. Calculate and interpret instantaneous rates of change and interpret rates of change in applications.

    6. Calculate derivatives and values of derivatives of polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions using differentiation techniques including the constant rule, power rule, product rule, quotient rule, and chain rule without the calculator.

    7. Calculate derivatives and values of derivatives of higher order without the calculator.


    APPLICATIONS OF DIFFERENTIATION (content C, D)
    8. Determine where a function is non-differentiable graphically and computationally.

    9. Determine the critical value(s), critical point(s), inflection value(s), inflection point(s), interval(s) of increasing, interval(s) of decreasing, concavity, and relative extrema of a function from a graph and computationally with and without the calculator.

    10. Given the graph of a function, sketch the graphs of the first and second derivatives.

    11. Determine equations of tangent lines and represent and interpret them graphically and in words.

    12. Calculate marginal profit, marginal revenue, and marginal cost given a formula, graph or other information for a profit, revenue, and/or cost function.
    13. Solve applied optimization problems, such as maximizing profit, minimizing cost, minimizing inventory costs, or maximizing yield.

    14. Calculate elasticity of demand and interpret the value

    INTEGRATION AND APPLICATIONS (content D, E, F)
    15. Determine indefinite integrals of x^n, e^x, ln(x) and any linear combination of these functions.

    16. Evaluate proper definite integrals of x^n, e^x, ln(x) and any linear combination of these functions, and use these definite integrals to solve applied problems with and without the calculator.
    17. Calculate appropriate indefinite and definite integrals using substitution and a table of integrals.
    18. Calculate the area bounded between curves.
    19. Approximate the area bounded between curves using left or right endpoint approximation.

    20. Interpret the area between curves in applications and use the appropriate units (e.g. interpret the integral of marginal cost as a change in total cost)

    21. Use definite integrals to solve applied problems, including finding the consumer’s surplus, producer’s surplus, and average value of a function on an interval.


    FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES (content G)
    22. Evaluate a function of several variables.

    23. Calculate and evaluate partial derivatives, including first partials, second partials, and mixed partials.

    WRITING
    24. Use appropriate units when solving application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in sentences, when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.

    GENERAL SKILLS
    25. Communicate methods of solution and solutions to problems clearly to their intended audience.

    26. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
  
  •  

    MATH& 151 Calculus I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 124 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH& 142  with a grade of at least 2.0, satisfactory placement test score, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Families of algebraic and transcendental functions and their derivatives. Limits, including indeterminate forms. Applications of differential calculus, anti-derivatives.

    Student Outcomes
    Limits and Continuity
    1. Determine limits of functions at real numbers and at infinity using graphical, algebraic, and numerical techniques.
    2. Use the definition of continuity to graphically and analytically determine whether a function is continuous.
    3. Determine the differentiability of a function graphically and/or analytically.
    4. Use the limit definition of the derivative to find the derivatives of polynomial functions.

    Derivatives of Algebraic and Transcendental Functions
    5. Calculate the derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions by use of the basic rules of differentiation including the product, quotient, and chain rules, without use of technology.
    6. Calculate derivatives of functions defined implicitly.

    Applications of Derivatives
    7. Determine average and instantaneous rates of change algebraically, graphically, and numerically, and interpret the rate of change in the context of the problem.
    8. Determine the equations of tangent lines.
    9. Sketch the graph of the first and second derivatives when given the graph of a function. Interpret the graph in the context of the problem.
    10. Find global and local extrema, inflection points, intervals of increase/decrease, and intervals of concavity, and use these to sketch the graph of a function.
    11. Apply differentiation to solve applications, including optimization and related rates, in a variety of fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, or economics.
    12. Calculate linear approximations and/or differentials, and use them to solve problems such as approximating function values and/or calculating uncertainties.
    13. Apply L’Hospital’s Rule to calculate limits of indeterminate forms, including 0/0, inf/inf, and 0*inf.

    Anti-derivatives
    14. Calculate anti-derivatives of power functions, polynomials, basic exponentials, and basic trigonometric functions.

    General Content
    15. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation, units, and appropriate language.
    16. Solve and analyze application problems that involve concepts covered in this course and in previous courses.
    17. Use technology appropriately as a tool to solve problems.
    18. Link graphical, numeric, and symbolic representations of derivatives when interpreting situations and analyzing problems.
  
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    MATH& 152 Calculus II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 125 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH& 151  with a grade of 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Definite and indefinite integrals. Methods of Integration. Applications of integration. Improper integrals. Introduction to first order differential equations.

    Student Outcomes
    Techniques and Concepts of Integration
    1. Apply the following techniques of integration to integrate polynomial, rational, and transcendental functions without use of technology: Power rule, substitution, parts, partial fractions, and algebraic manipulation.
    2. Evaluate definite integrals graphically and with the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
    3. Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to find the derivative of integral functions.
    4. Identify and evaluate improper integrals.
    5. Apply approximation techniques (such as Riemann sums, trapezoidal rule, Simpson’s rule) in order to approximate the value of definite integrals, and evaluate the accuracy of their answer using error formulas or other methods.

    Applications of Integration
    6. Compute the area under a curve and between curves using integration and interpret the solution in the context of the problem.
    7. Compute volumes of solids of revolution and other solids using disc, washer, shell and cross-section integration techniques.
    8. Calculate the length of a curve using integration.
    9. Calculate the average value of a function using integration.
    10. Apply integrals to solve a variety of problems in physics, engineering, economics, chemistry, or biology.

    Differential Equations
    11. Sketch and interpret direction fields.
    12. Match graphical solutions to differential equations.
    13. Solve and sketch solutions to ordinary, first-order differential equations for multiple initial conditions using numerical or graphical techniques.
    14. Solve separable differential equations analytically.

    General Content
    15. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation, units, and appropriate language.
    16. Solve and analyze application problems that involve concepts covered in this course and in previous courses.
    17. Use technology appropriately as a tool to solve problems.
    18. Link graphical, numeric, and symbolic representations of the integral when interpreting situations and analyzing problems.
  
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    MATH& 153 Calculus III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MATH 126 - CCN

    Prerequisite Completion of MATH& 152  with a grade of 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Sequences and series. Vectors and geometry of space. The calculus of vector functions and parametric surfaces. Polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates.

    Student Outcomes
    The student should be able to:

    Sequences and series component
    1. Determine the terms of a recursively defined sequence.
    2. Estimate the limit of a convergent sequence using graphical and numerical techniques.
    3. Determine the convergence of a sequence and find the exact limit, if it exists.
    4. Determine the convergence of a geometric series and find its sum, if it exists.
    5. Apply the integral, comparison, limit comparison, ratio, and alternating series tests to determine the convergence of a given series.
    6. Use the integral test and alternating series test to bound the error in estimating the sum of a convergent series via a partial sum.
    7. Determine the radius and interval of convergence of a given power series.
    8. Represent appropriate functions as a power series via geometric series and Taylor’s theorem.
    9. Differentiate and integrate power series.
    10. Solve problems in mathematics and/or the sciences via Taylor polynomial representations of a function.
    11. Explore the convergence of series and sequences utilizing an appropriate computer algebra system.


    Vectors component
    12. Determine the distance between points in three dimensional space.
    13. Determine the equation of a sphere centered at a given point and of a given radius.
    14. Determine the magnitude of a vector.

    Dot and cross product component
    15. Interpret the dot product as the work done by a constant force.
    16. Compute the dot product of two vectors.
    17. Determine the angle between two vectors.
    18. Compute the projection of one vector onto another.
    19. Determine the area of the parallelogram spanned by two vectors via the magnitude of the cross product.
    20. Determine the volume of a parallelepiped spanned by three vectors via the magnitude of the scalar triple product.
    21. Interpret the cross product as the torque produced by the moment of a force along an axis.
    22. Compute the cross product of two vectors.
    23. Determine the volume of the parallelepiped spanned by three vectors via the scalar triple product.


    Calculus of vector functions, space curves, and parametric surfaces component
    24. Determine the parametric equation of a line given sufficient information (e.g, a point and a parallel vector, two points).
    25. Determine the scalar equation of a plane given sufficient information (e.g, three points, a point and a normal vector, a point and two non-parallel vectors).
    26. Determine the angle of intersection between two planes.
    27. Use the technique of level curves to sketch the graph of a function of two variables.
    28. Use appropriate computer technology to graph a function of two variables.
    29. Determine the cylindrical and spherical coordinates of a point in three dimensional space.
    30. Determine the Cartesian coordinates of cylindrical and spherical points.
    31. Identify and/or sketch a solid defined by inequalities or equations in cylindrical or spherical coordinates.
    32. Identify the graphs of standard equations (e.g, sphere, paraboloid, cylindrical surfaces, helix).
    33. Sketch the graph of a vector valued function.
    34. Integrate and differentiate vector valued functions.
    35. Determine tangent lines to space curves.
    36. Determine the arc length of a space curve or polar curve.
    37. Determine the area enclosed by a polar curve.


    Applications to physics component
    38. Determine the position, velocity, and acceleration of an object moving along a given trajectory.
    39. Use Newton’s Second Law of Motion to determine the force acting on an object moving radially.
    40. Use Newton’s Second Law of Motion to determine the trajectory of a projectile fired at a given angle and with a given initial velocity.
    41. Solve basic problems in astronomy via the calculus of vector curves (e.g, Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion).


    General Content
    42. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    43. Write clear, coherent, and correct mathematical proofs at a basic level, including construction of counter examples and proof by contradiction.
    44. Link graphical, numeric, and symbolic approaches when interpreting situations and analyzing problems.
  
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    MATH& 163 Calculus 3 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH& 152  with a grade of 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Sequences and series, multi-variable functions and their graphs, vector algebra and vector functions, partial differentiation.

    Student Outcomes
    Sequences and Series
    1. Generate the terms of a sequence from an explicit or recursive equation.
    2. Determine the formulas for simple sequences (geometric, arithmetic, power).
    3. Determine the limit of a sequence, if it exists.
    4. Determine the convergence of simple series (e.g., harmonic series) by comparing to improper integrals.
    5. Explore the convergence of series and sequences using technology.
    6. Determine the convergence of a geometric series and find its sum if it exists.
    7. Determine the radius of convergence of a power series using the ratio test.
    8. Represent appropriate functions via geometric series and Taylor series.
    9. Differentiate and integrate power series.

    Vectors
    10. Determine the distance between points in three dimensional space.
    11. Determine the equation of a sphere centered at a given point and of a given radius.
    12. Determine the magnitude of a vector.
    13. Perform basic computations with vectors numerically and graphically.
    14. Compute the dot product of two vectors.
    15. Determine the angle between two vectors.
    16. Compute the projection of one vector onto another.
    17. Compute the cross product of two vectors.
    18. Determine the area of the parallelogram spanned by two vectors via the magnitude of the cross product.

    Vector Functions and Space Curves
    19. Determine the parametric equation of a line given sufficient information (e.g., a point and a parallel vector, two points).
    20. Determine the scalar equation of a plane given sufficient information (e.g., three points, a point and a normal vector, a point and two non-parallel vectors).
    21. Sketch the graph of a vector valued function (parameterized curve).
    22. Identify the graphs of standard space curves (e.g., line, parabola, circle, helix).
    23. Integrate and differentiate vector valued functions.
    24. Determine tangent lines to space curves.
    25. Determine the arc length of a space curve.

    Functions of Several Variables and 3D Surfaces
    26. Evaluate functions of several variables numerically, graphically, and symbolically.
    27. Use the technique of level curves to sketch the graph of a function of two variables.
    28. Graph functions of several variables utilizing technology as appropriate.
    29. Identify the graphs of standard surfaces (e.g., sphere, paraboloid, ellipsoid, cylindrical surfaces).
    30. Compute limits of functions of several variables.
    31. Determine the domain and continuity of a function of several variables.

    Partial Derivatives
    32. Utilize the definition of the partial derivative of a function of several variables to solve rate of change problems.
    33. Compute partial derivatives symbolically utilizing the basic techniques from single variable calculus.
    34. Determine implicit and parametric equations for the tangent plane to a surface that is defined by the graph of a function.
    35. Compute partial derivatives via the chain rule and through implicit differentiation.
    36. Apply directional derivatives to solve rate of change problems in arbitrary directions. Determine the direction of maximal and minimal change of a function of several variables.
    37. Apply techniques of partial derivatives to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    General Content
    38. Solve application problems in the sciences, including determining position, velocity, and acceleration of an object moving along a given trajectory.
    39. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    40. Link graphical, numeric, and symbolic approaches when interpreting situations and analyzing problems.
  
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    MATH& 264 Calculus 4 (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Completion of MATH& 163  with a grade of 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Multivariable optimization, multiple integrals, vector fields, line and surface integrals, divergence and curl, Stokes’ Theorem, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorem.

    Student Outcomes
    Coordinate Systems
    1. Determine the arc length of a polar curve.
    2. Determine the area enclosed by a polar curve.
    3. Convert a point in three dimensional space from Cartesian coordinates to cylindrical and spherical coordinates and vice versa.
    4. Identify and/or sketch a solid defined by inequalities or equations in cylindrical or spherical coordinates.

    Applications of Partial Derivatives
    5. Utilize the definition of the partial derivative of a function of several variables to solve rate of change problems.
    6. Compute partial derivatives symbolically utilizing the basic techniques from single variable calculus.
    7. Locate and test extrema using the Second Derivative Test.
    8. Utilize Lagrange multipliers to optimize functions of several variables given one or more constraints.
    9. Apply techniques of partial derivatives to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    Multiple Integrals
    10. Construct the double integral of a function of two variables as the limit of a Riemann sum.
    11. Compute double integrals of functions of two variables over rectangular regions by identifying the relevant solid and computing its volume.
    12. Compute multiple integrals over general regions whose boundaries are parameterized by curves or surfaces, utilizing the basic techniques from single variable calculus.
    13. Compute double and triple integrals in polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.
    14. Compute the surface area of a parameterized surface via a double integral.
    15. Describe and construct basic transformations and compute their Jacobians.
    16. Apply the Change of Variables theorem to compute multiple integrals.
    17. Apply techniques of multiple integrals to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    Vector Calculus
    18. Draw vector fields in two and three dimensions.
    19. Qualitatively determine characteristics of vector fields, including periodic orbits and singularities.
    20. Compute the line integral of a function and of a vector field along a parametrized curve.
    21. Determine the work done by a force field in moving a mass-less particle along a parameterized trajectory.
    22. Determine whether a vector field is conservative or not and construct a potential if one exists.
    23. Apply the Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals.
    24. Apply Green’s theorem to line integrals around closed paths.
    25. Compute the curl of a vector field and describe its implications.
    26. Construct and compute surface integrals of vector fields.
    27. Determine the net rate of flow of a fluid through a parameterized membrane.
    28. Use Stokes’ theorem to compute surface and triple integrals.
    29. Compute the divergence of a vector field and apply the divergence theorem to compute surface and triple integrals.
    30. Apply techniques of vector analysis to solve problems in the sciences and engineering.

    General Content
    31. Write clear, correct, and complete solutions to mathematical problems utilizing proper mathematical notation and appropriate language.
    32. Utilize computer algebra and graphical systems to solve problems, visualize abstract concepts, and model physical problems, as appropriate.

Mathematics Corequisite

  
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    MATHC 098 Intermediate Algebra for Precalculus Corequisite 2 credits



    Prerequisite MATH 077  or placement.

    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH 98 class for students who have not met the MATH 98 prerequisites.  Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH 98, such as arithmetic with real numbers, order of operations, algebraic expressions, slope-intercept form of a linear equation, solving equations, graphing, exponents and radicals and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply operations, arithmetic properties, and laws of exponents to simplify and evaluate algebraic expressions; and the properties of equality to solve linear, polynomial, rational and radical equations.
    Graph linear, polynomial, rational and radical functions.
    Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply, and retain mathematical learning.
  
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    MATHC 107 Math in Society Corequisite 2 credits



    Prerequisite MATH 077  or by placement.

    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH& 107 class for students who have not met the MATH& 107 prerequisites.  Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH& 107, such as numeracy, proportional reasoning, equations/formulas, graphs and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    Use numeracy, proportional reasoning and equations/formulas to solve financial, statistical and other complex problems.
    Use graphs to interpret, predict and analyze data and models.
    Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply, and retain mathematical learning.
  
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    MATHC 111 College Math for Early Childhood Edu Corequisite 2 credits



    Prerequisite MATH 077  or placement.

    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH 111 class for students who have not met the MATH 111 prerequisites.  Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH 111, such as numeracy, proportional reasoning, equations/formulas, graphs and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use numeracy and proportional reasoning for learning methods of teaching and using number systems, statistics, probability, patterns and sequences.
    2. Use expressions/equations/formulas and graphs in algebraic expressions and functions.
    3. Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply, and retain mathematical learning.
  
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    MATHC 131 Math for Elem Educ 1 Corequisite 2



    Prerequisite MATH 077  or placement.

    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH& 131 class for students who have not met the MATH& 131 prerequisites. Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH& 131, such as numeracy, proportional reasoning, equations/formulas, graphs and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    Use numeracy and proportional reasoning for learning methods of teaching about number systems and mathematical communication.
    Use expressions/equations/formulas and graphs to learn methods of teaching about algebraic expressions and functions.
    Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply, and retain mathematical learning.
  
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    MATHC 141 Precalculus I Corequisite 2 credits



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement into MATH 098 , completion of MATH 060  or MATH 096  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH& 141 class for students who have not met the MATH& 141 prerequisites. Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH& 141, such as order of operations, algebraic expressions, solving equations and inequalities, graphing, functions, linear functions and graphs, graphing calculators, and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply mathematical operations to simplify, evaluate and solve linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and square root functions.
    2. Use equations, tables, and graphs to represent relationships between variables and model real-world scenarios.
    3. Use technology to visualize, evaluate and solve linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and square root functions.
    4. Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply and retain mathematical learning.
  
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    MATHC 146 Introduction to Statistics Lab (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH& 146 class for students who have not met the MATH& 146 prerequisites. Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH& 146, such as numeracy, proportional reasoning, equations/formulas, inequalities, graphs and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to compare the magnitude of real numbers when testing hypotheses.
    2. Use proportions to analyze real-world data.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate a variety of statistical equations and formulas.
    4. Utilize inequalities to create histograms, analyze probabilities, and test hypotheses.
    5. Use graphing skills to display data in an appropriate form.
    6. Utilize study skills to comprehend, retain, and apply class content.
    7. Employ time management techniques, test-taking strategies, a growth mindset, and resourcefulness to achieve academic success.
    8. Apply reading strategies such as Reading Apprenticeship to analyze contextualized problems in Statistics.
    9. Engage with peers and the course instructor to build relationships and develop community.
  
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    MATHC 147 Business Precalculus Corequisite (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This is a support class that is attached to a corequisite MATH 147 class for students who have not met the MATH 147 prerequisites. Topics to be covered are those prerequisite skills necessary to learn the content of MATH 147, such as order of operations, algebraic expressions, solving equations and inequalities, graphing, functions, linear functions and graphs, graphing calculators, and skills for academic success.

    Student Outcomes
    Apply mathematical operations to simplify, evaluate and solve linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and square root functions.
    Use equations, tables, and graphs to represent relationships between variables and model real-world scenarios. 
    Use technology to visualize, evaluate and solve linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, absolute value, and square root functions.
    Employ strategies and study skills to comprehend, apply and retain mathematical learning.

Music

  
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    MUSC 100 Introduction to Rock and Roll (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 100

    Course Description
    Rock and roll as a language of music from a listener’s perspective. Listening skills are exercised and become the vehicle through which specific music concepts are examined. Some social, biographical, and historical data covered.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and aurally recognize rock and roll compositions known to represent specific rock and roll styles.
    2. Trace relevant aspects of the sociological, historical, and economic development of America between 1950-1999.
    3. Assess the development of America between 1950-1999 and determine its effect on the evolution of rock music.
    4. Identify the elements of rock music.
    5. Give examples of the nonmusical features of rock music that make such music an expressive art form and contribute to elements of style.
    6. Through an aural analysis identify the instrumentation of select rock recordings
    7. Recall specific biographical and historical information of select rock personalities.
    8. Based on a musical, historical and sociological study of the evolution of rock, predict future events in its developmental course.
  
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    MUSC 102 American Popular Music (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 105

    Course Description
    Study of American music including: popular song, blues, jazz, country and rock styles. Historical and social elements that impacted their development. Current popular music trends will be studied as extensions of or responses to past styles.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and aurally recognize specific music styles and compositions that represent the popular music genre.
    2. Examine the sources of popular music: European American, African American, and Latin American.
    3. Identify and evaluate the socioeconomic, political, historical, and cultural events that affected the creation and development of popular music in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.
    4. Trace the advancements of music technology and the evolution of the entertainment business and their influences on popular music.
    5. Recall and compare various elements of 19th and early 20th century American popular song including minstrel shows, vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley, dance music, and ragtime.
    6. Define and aurally distinguish between the different styles, songs, and artists of the Classic, Country, Delta, and Chicago blues traditions.
    7. Relate social and musical elements of the Jazz Age and Swing Era to specific historical events.
    8. Trace the origins of country music, and its emergence into popular culture.
    9. Identify the origins of early rock and interpret their influence on the development of future musical styles.
    10. Recall, analyze, and compare specific musical styles, artists, and songs from the Rock and Roll decades from 1950-to the present.
  
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    MUSC 103 Introduction to Jazz (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 103

    Course Description
    Introduces jazz and it’s variations: ragtime, blues, dixieland, boogie, swing, bebop, funk & fusion. Relevant cultural data pertaining to jazz is covered. Develops recognition skills through listening. Previous music experience is not necessary.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and aurally recognize compositions known to represent specific styles of jazz.
    2. Trace relevant aspects of the sociological, historical, and economic development of those cultures involved in the production of jazz between 1800-to the present.
    3. Assess the development of the American culture between 1800 and the present and determine its effect on the evolution of jazz.
    4. Analyze and aurally identify music concepts found within specific jazz music examples.
    5. Give examples of the nonmusical features of jazz contribute to elements of style.
    6. Identify the style of select jazz recordings through aural analysis.
    7. Recall specific biographical and historical information of select jazz personalities.
    8. Predict future developments in jazz based on a musical., historical, and sociologically study of its evolution.
  
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    MUSC 106 World Music (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Examines select cultures from different areas around the world. Explores music concepts and engages social issues including: diversity, cultural differences and societal motivations for writing, performing and preserving music.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify methodologies for looking at the music of other cultures (ethnomusicology).
    2. Examine traditional cultures in a changing world.
    3. Compare and contrast the music of other cultures before and after the influence of Western popular music.
    4. Examine the different kinds of musical instruments and teaching methods from around the world.
    5. Give examples of the nonmusical features of cultures that influence and inform musical traditions.
    6. Through an aural analysis identify the different features of music from around the world.
    7. Enumerate cultural differences and similarities between other cultures and our own in order to provoke further understanding of ethnicity, and diversity.
    8. Relate the methodologies of ethnomusicology to our own musical world.
  
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    MUSC 107 Audio Production I: Beginning (2.5 credits)



    Formerly MUSIC 107

    Course Description
    An introductory, hands-on course that covers the basics of midi sequencing, sound reinforcement, microphone construction and application, signal processing equipment, and analog multi-track recording.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create “midi” sequencing tracks.
    2. Combine “midi” sequencing tracks with analog and digital recordings.
    3. Identify the fundamental components and explain the operation of a basic sound reinforcement system.
    4. Recall basic information regarding the construction and application of select microphones
    5. Identify and define the purpose of select signal processing equipment used in multi-track recording.
    6. Produce an analog multi-track recording.
    7. Recite the basics of digital audio recording.
  
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    MUSC 108 Audio Production II: Intermediate (2.5 credits)



    Formerly MUSIC 108

    Prerequisite MUSC 107  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    An intermediate, hands-on course that covers midi sequencing, sound reinforcement, microphone construction and application, signal processing equipment, and analog multi-track recording.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create “midi” sequencing tracks.
    2. Track a recording session using mixers, microphone preamplifiers, analog signal processors, and headphone monitoring
    3. Combine “midi” sequencing tracks with pre-existing material and add a “voice over” using a microphone
    4. Design the schematics and assemble a complete sound system
    5. Set up a combo for tracking based on the microphone data covered in Audio I
    6. Route and process 8 or more audio tracks while using signal processing equipment
    7. Record multiple tracks using microphones, mixers, signal processing and headphone monitoring
    8. Describe Pulse Code Modulation Theory and the importance of sample rate, bit rate, error correction in Red Book Standards
  
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    MUSC 109 Audio Production III: Advanced (2.5 credits)



    Formerly MUSIC 109

    Prerequisite MUSC 107  and MUSC 108  with at least a 1.5 grade in both classes.

    Course Description
    An advanced, hands-on course that covers midi sequencing, code synchronization, sound reinforcement, microphone construction and application, signal processing equipment, analog multi-track recording and digital multi-track recording.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create “midi” sequencing tracks using code synchronization
    2. Track a recording session using complex audio routing and signal matching
    3. Create a full production using code synchronization, analog audio, digital audio, and sound effects
    4. Design a sound system for a major live music production that involves the use of mixing channels, microphones, audio snakes, audio splitters, signal processing, and live recording devices
    5. Apply stereo, ambient, and sampling microphone techniques in assigned recording projects
    6. Record a minimum of 16 tracks of audio using ADAT and mix-down to stereo DAT
    7. Finish a CD master from DAT using Pro-Tools software and hardware
  
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    MUSC 126 Beginning Class Guitar (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 126

    Course Description
    A performance course designed for the beginning guitarist. No prior experience expected. Students must furnish their own guitar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read treble clef notes, tablature, chord graphs, and identify them on the fretboard.
    2. Strum the chords to beginning music literature while maintaining a constant tempo.
    3. Interpret elements of basic music theory (e.g., time signatures, chord graphs, strum bars, tempo markings).
    4. Perform 15 basic guitar chords and 10 altered guitar chords.
    5. Perform 15 assigned riffs on the guitar.
    6. Define musical terms, and identify melodic and harmonic intervals.
    7. Play chromatic scale positions 1 through 10 at 120M.M.
  
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    MUSC 127 Intermediate Class Guitar (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 127

    Prerequisite MUSC 126  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    A performance course designed for the intermediate guitarist. MUSC 126 or the equivalent required. Students must furnish their own guitar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read treble clef notes, tablature, chord graphs, and identify them on the fret-board.
    2. Strum and play melodies to intermediate guitar repertoire.
    3. Interpret elements of intermediate music theory (e.g., time signatures, chord graphs, strum and picking patterns, dynamics).
    4. Perform moveable chord forms with root notes on the fifth and sixth strings.
    5. Perform intermediate chord progressions, riffs, and melodies on the guitar.
    6. Play five moveable scale positions 1 through 10 at 200 M.M. (e.g., chromatic, major, minor, pentatonic, and blues).
    7. Demonstrate intermediate guitar techniques (e.g., hammer on, pull off, tremolo, vibrato, double-time strumming, alternating root to fifth bass lines, bending strings down, down and up picking, slides, harmonics, finger-style).
  
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    MUSC 144 Concert Choir (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 144A

    Course Description
    Non-auditioned choir for both beginning and experienced singers. Rehearses and performs choral literature. Quarterly concerts required. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate and analyze quality vocal pedagogy and technique.
    2. Demonstrate and analyze choral music literature theoretically and aurally.
    3. Learn and perform a varying assortment of choral repertory.
    4. Work effectively as part of a team (ensemble) in rehearsal, performance and travel.
    5. Sing in a variety of languages with proper diction and enunciation
    6. Demonstrate a professional attitude toward practice, using self-motivation and self-evaluation, as it pertains to the appropriate performance of selected music.
    7. Demonstrate professional performance etiquette.
    8. Listen and analyze live and recorded performances of choral literature
  
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    MUSC 147 Chamber Choir (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Audition and/or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An smaller auditioned choir intended for more experienced singers. Rehearses and performs advanced choral literature. Quarterly concerts and occasional touring are required. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and apply quality vocal pedagogy and technique.
    2. Analyze choral music literature theoretically and aurally.
    3. Perform a varying assortment of choral repertory.
    4. Work effectively as part of a small ensemble in rehearsal, performance and travel.
    5. Sing in a variety of languages with proper diction and enunciation.
    6. Display a professional attitude toward practice, using self-motivation and self-evaluation, as it pertains to the appropriate performance of selected music.
    7. Demonstrate professional performance etiquette.
  
  •  

    MUSC 150 College Band (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 150A

    Course Description
    A large performance group open to all students with experience reading and performing instrumental band literature. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert
  
  •  

    MUSC 154 College Orchestra (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 154A

    Course Description
    A large performance group open to all students with experience reading and performing orchestra literature. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.

    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style and balance.

    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.

    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert
  
  •  

    MUSC 157 Jazz Band (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 157A

    Course Description
    A jazz ensemble intended to provide the experienced instrumentalist an opportunity to rehearse and perform selected jazz literature. Non-major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance on music selected for quarterly concerts.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 160 Private Instruction: Arranging (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 130A

    Prerequisite MUSC& 143  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing beginning levels of arranging. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the parameters of, and produce, a musical arrangement.
    2. Identify and research areas of musical relevance to that arrangement.
    3. Show incremental and measurable progress towards the completion of the arrangement.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 161 Private Instruction: Improvisation (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in improvisation. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals
  
  •  

    MUSC 162 Private Instruction: Brass (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in brass. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 163 Private Instruction: Woodwinds (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 133A

    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in woodwinds. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 164 Private Instruction: Percussion (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in percussion. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.)pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.)dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.)timbre;
    d.)balance;
    e.)comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 165 Private Instruction: Voice (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in voice. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 166 Private Instruction: Orchestral Strings (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in orchestral strings. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 167 Private Instruction: Keyboard (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in keyboard. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 168 Private Instruction: Plectrum Strings (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in plectrum. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 170 Brass Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 170A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small brass ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 171 Woodwind Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 171A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small woodwind ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 172 Percussion Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 172A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    A small performance group open to all students with experience in reading and performing percussion ensemble literature. Outside performances required. Student self-initiative is a vital component of success in this class.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 173 String Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 173A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small instrument ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 174 Vocal Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 174A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small vocal ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 181 Beginning Class Piano (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 120

    Course Description
    Basic introduction to playing piano by establishing good reading habits, rhythmic competency and learning the basic fundamentals of music theory.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read notes on the grand staff and identify them on the keyboard.
    2. Play easy pieces in the C, G, and F positions.
    3. Interpret elements of basic music theory including time signatures, notation, tempo markings, and chords.
    4. Define musical terms, and identify melodic and harmonic intervals.
    5. Build and play three major scales and their chord progressions (I-IV-V7).
    6. Perform two solo recital pieces for fellow students.
    7. Identify simple musical forms.
  
  •  

    MUSC 182 Intermediate Class Piano (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 121

    Prerequisite MUSC 181  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A continuation of MUSC 181 by establishing better reading habits and rhythmic orientation. Building a stronger technical background and learning more fundamentals of music theory.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play the a-minor, d-minor, and e-minor harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, and the i, iv, and V7 chords.
    2. Play a D-major scale, arpeggios, and the I, IV, and V7 chords.
    3. Identify the 6/8 time signature.
    4. Analyze and identify the major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads in root position, and in 1st and 2nd inversions.
    5. Perform four solo pieces in a recital for fellow students.
    6. Play with proper position.
  
  •  

    MUSC 183 Advanced Class Piano (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 122

    Prerequisite MUSC 182  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    To increase music reading ability and keyboard technical skills. Prepare students for the piano proficiency test required for a music degree in a four-year institution.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play the Bb-major, Eb-major, and Ab-major scales, arpeggios, and chords.
    2. Play the g-minor, c-minor, and f-minor scales, arpeggios, and chords.
    3. Demonstrate sight-reading skills.
    4. Perform four solo pieces in a recital for fellow students.
    5. Memorize two piano pieces for performance.
    6. Harmonize a melody from a lead sheet, using triads and inversions.
    7. Identify and construct seventh chords and their inversions.
    8. Interpret music in performance.
  
  •  

    MUSC 205 Music for Teachers (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A general introduction to music as applied to the developmental foundation of learning in young children. Explores theories, techniques, cultural influences, and curriculum design.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Analyze and aurally identify the musical concepts found within developmentally appropriate songs for children birth through grade 3.

    2.Simulate the teacher’s role in planning and leading group music times for children birth through grade 3 which incorporate designated types of songs, musical props, song-illustrations, movement activities, leadership, and presentation skills.

    3. Plan developmentally appropriate movement activities for young children based on the stages of physical development and the elements and principles of dance.

    4. Create and use musical instruments appropriate for the multicultural classroom for young children and identify the properties of sound inherent in each.

    5.Assess the impact and benefit of music and movement experiences upon individual children with ability differences in order to plan appropriate and supportive curriculum.

    6.Articulate methods of music instruction which support the culture of individual families in the program, and cultural groups within the community.

    7.Create developmentally appropriate music curricular plans incorporating specific thematic, age, music, movement, and materials requirements.

    8. Apply basic music knowledge, elements, and skills used in music such as melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, form, tempo, chords, tonal systems, dynamics, beat, and expression in order to plan and implement a cohesive music curriculum for young children.
  
  •  

    MUSC 244 Concert Choir (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 244A

    Course Description
    Non-auditioned choir for both beginning and experienced singers. Rehearses and performs choral literature. Quarterly concerts required. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate and analyze quality vocal pedagogy and technique.
    2. Demonstrate and analyze choral music literature theoretically and aurally.
    3. Learn and perform a varying assortment of choral repertory.
    4. Work effectively as part of a team (ensemble) in rehearsal, performance and travel.
    5. Sing in a variety of languages with proper diction and enunciation
    6. Demonstrate a professional attitude toward practice, using self-motivation and self-evaluation, as it pertains to the appropriate performance of selected music.
    7. Demonstrate professional performance etiquette.
    8. Listen and analyze live and recorded performances of choral literature
  
  •  

    MUSC 247 Chamber Choir (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Audition and/or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An smaller auditioned choir intended for more experienced singers. Rehearses and performs advanced choral literature. Quarterly concerts and occasional touring are required. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and apply quality vocal pedagogy and technique.
    2. Analyze choral music literature theoretically and aurally.
    3. Perform a varying assortment of choral repertory.
    4. Work effectively as part of a small ensemble in rehearsal, performance and travel.
    5. Sing in a variety of languages with proper diction and enunciation.
    6. Display a professional attitude toward practice, using self-motivation and self-evaluation, as it pertains to the appropriate performance of selected music.
    7. Demonstrate professional performance etiquette.
  
  •  

    MUSC 250 College Band (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 250A

    Course Description
    A large performance group open to all students with experience reading and performing instrumental band literature. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert
  
  •  

    MUSC 254 College Orchestra (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 254A

    Course Description
    A large performance group open to all students with experience reading and performing orchestra literature. Non-music major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.

    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style and balance.

    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.

    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert
  
  •  

    MUSC 257 Jazz Band (2 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 257A

    Course Description
    A jazz ensemble intended to provide the experienced instrumentalist an opportunity to rehearse and perform selected jazz literature. Non-major participation encouraged. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. Demonstrate appropriate timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance on music selected for quarterly concerts.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 260 Private Instruction: Arranging (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MUSC& 143  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing beginning levels of arranging. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the parameters of, and produce, a musical arrangement.
    2. Identify and research areas of musical relevance to that arrangement.
    3. Show incremental and measurable progress towards the completion of the arrangement.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 261 Private Instruction: Improvisation (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in improvisation. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals
  
  •  

    MUSC 262 Private Instruction: Brass (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in brass. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 263 Private Instruction: Woodwind (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in woodwinds.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 264 Private Instruction: Percussion (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in percussion. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 265 Private Instruction: Voice (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in voice. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 266 Private Instruction: Orchestral Strings (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in orchestral strings. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 267 Private Instruction: Keyboard (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in keyboard. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 268 Private Instruction: Plectrum Strings (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An individual instruction course geared towards advancing all levels of student music performance in plectrum. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate through performance measurable improvement in some, if not all, of the following areas:
    a.) pitch, rhythm, tempo, articulation, and intonation precision;
    b.) dynamic, phrase, and stylistic expression;
    c.) timbre;
    d.) balance;
    e.) comping and solo improvisation techniques.

    2. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the pursuit of selected goals.
  
  •  

    MUSC 270 Brass Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 270A

    Prerequisite Instructor Permission Required.

    Course Description
    Small brass ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 271 Woodwind Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 271A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small woodwind ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    4. Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
  •  

    MUSC 272 Percussion Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 272A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Small percussion ensemble for students who assmble a group. A coach will be proviced. Outside performances encouraged in connection with larger Pierce College ensembles. Course is repeatable for additional credit up to 3 times in the degree.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
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    MUSC 273 String Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 273A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    A small performance group open to all students with experience in reading and performing string ensemble literature (i.e., string quartet). Outside performances required. Student self-initiative is a vital component of success in this class.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
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    MUSC 274 Vocal Ensemble (1 credit)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 274A

    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    A small performance group open to all students with experience in reading and performing vocal ensemble literature (i.e., madrigals). Outside performances required. Student self-initiative is a vital component of success in this class.

    Student Outcomes
    1. At the community college level, perform selected music at designated quarterly concerts.
    2. At the community college level and on music selected for quarterly concerts, demonstrate appropriate ability in the areas of timbre, rhythmic accuracy, intonation, expression, style, and balance.
    3. Work effectively as a part of a team.
    Demonstrate a professional attitude towards practice, self-motivation, and self-evaluation as it pertains to the appropriate performance of music selected for each quarterly concert.
  
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    MUSC& 105 Music Appreciation (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 101-CCN

    Course Description
    Introduces students to Euorpean art music from: Medieval through the Twentieth Century. Relevant cultural, biographical, and historical data are covered relating to art music and its performance. No previous music experience necessary.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and aurally recognize compositions known to represent specific styles of classical music.
    2. Trace relevant aspects of the sociological, historical, and economic development of those cultures involved in the production of classical music between 600-2000.
    3. Assess the development of specific cultures between 600-2000 and determine their effect on the evolution of classical music.
    4. Analyze and aurally identify music concepts found within specific music examples.
    5. Give examples of the nonmusical features of classical music that contribute to elements of the style.
    6. Identify the genre and style of select classical music recordings through aural analysis.
    7. Recall specific biographical and historical information of select classical music personalities.
    8. Predict, based on a musical, historical, and sociological study of the evolution of classical music, future events in its developmental course.
  
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    MUSC& 141 Music Theory I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 110 - CCN

    Course Description
    Music literacy and aural skills including: key and time signatures, intervals, triad construction, counterpoint and voice leading. Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 181 is strongly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play, sing, notate, and compose pitches on the staff and keyboard.
    2. Play, sing, analyze, notate, spell, discuss, and compose intervals.
    3. Play, sing, analyze, notate, spell, discuss, and compose major and minor scales and degrees.
    4. Analyze, spell, discuss, and compose the circle of fifths.
    5. Analyze, discuss, and relate key signatures to their parallel and relative keys.
    6. Aurally recognize scale degrees, intervals, chords (major, minor, augmented and diminished) and scales (major, and the 3 varieties of minor).
    7. Take dictation of simple melodies and rhythms.
    8. Analyze, notate, spell, discuss and compose chords and their inversions.
    9. Analyze, notate, and discuss figured bass symbols.
  
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    MUSC& 142 Music Theory II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 112 - CCN

    Prerequisite MUSC& 141  with at least a 1.5 grade or equivalent.

    Course Description
    Intended to follow Music Theory I in sequence, this course includes triads, chord progressions, figured bass, four-part writing, melodic construction, and aural skills. Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 182 or the is strongly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE AUTHENTIC CADENCES.
    2. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE PLAGAL CADENCES.
    3. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE MELODIES INVOLVING ELEMENTS OF PHRASE, PERIOD, REPETITION, AND SEQUENCE.
    4. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE MUSIC DEMONSTRATING FEATURES OF TRANSPOSITION.
    5. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE TRIADS IN INVERSION.
    6. TAKE DICTATION IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF EAR-TRAINING: MELODIC DICTATION, ERROR DETECTION IN MELODIES, SCALE DEGREES, INTERVALS, CHORDS AND CHORD PROGRESSIONS, SCALES, RHYTHMIC DICTATION.
    7. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE SUPERTONIC AND LEADING TONE TRIADS.
    8. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE MUSIC USING CORRECT FIGURED BASS SYMBOLS.
    9. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE MUSIC USING CORRECT FIGURED BASS SYMBOLS.
    10. PLAY, SING, ANALYZE, DICTATE, NOTATE, SPELL, DISCUSS, AND/OR COMPOSE CHORD VOICINGS AND INVERSIONS.
    11. DEMONSTRATE THE IMPORTANCE OF PRACTICE AND STUDY IN THE ACQUISITION OF MUSC&142 STUDENT OUTCOMES
  
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    MUSC& 143 Music Theory III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 114 - CCN

    Prerequisite MUSC& 142  with at least a 1.5 grade or the equivalent.

    Course Description
    Intended to follow Music Theory II, this course includes more advanced principles regarding chords, chord progressions, figured-bass, melodic construction, part-writing, and aural skills. Concurrent enrollment in MUSC 183 is strongly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose music using non-harmonic tones.
    2. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose dominant seventh and supertonic seventh chords.
    3. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose melodies involving elements of extension and double phrase.
    4. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose cadences.
    5. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose harmonic sequences.
    6. Take dictation in the following areas of ear-training: melodic dictation, error detection in melodies, scale degrees, intervals, chords and chord progressions, scales, rhythmic dictation.
    7. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss, and/or compose music that features secondary dominant chords and elementary modulation.
    8. Demonstrate the importance of practice and study in the acquisition of MUSC&143 student outcomes.
  
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    MUSC& 241 Music Theory IV (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 210 - CCN

    Prerequisite MUSC& 143  with at least a 1.5 grade or equivalent.

    Course Description
    Intended to follow Music Theory III, includes advanced study of harmony, including chromatic harmony, formal analysis and related aural skills. Piano skills equal to or above the intermediate level (MUSC 182) are highly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose secondary dominant modulations and related concepts.
    2. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose dominant chord relationships which use secondary leading tone chords, diminished and half-diminished chords and modulations which incorporate such chords.
    3. Analyze and compose music in binary, ternary and rounded binary form.
    4. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose less common chord progressions and extended part-writing procedures.
    5. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose differences between vocal and early instrumental writing.
    6. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose seventh chords and their use in four-part chorale writing.
    7. Take dictation in the following areas of ear-training: melodic dictation, error detection in melodies, identify scale degrees, identify intervals, identify chord progressions, four-part harmonic dictation, harmonic rhythm, non-harmonic tones, rhythm dictation, and error detection in rhythms.
    8. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose harmonic and select non-harmonic principles contributing to music style.
    9. Demonstrate the importance of practice and study in the acquisition of MUSC&241 student outcomes.
  
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    MUSC& 242 Music Theory V (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 212 - CCN

    Prerequisite MUSC& 241  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    Intended to follow Music Theory IV, this course continues the study of advanced chromatic harmony, more advanced formal analysis and related aural skills. Piano skills equal to or above intermediate level piano (MUS182) are highly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose diatonic seventh chords.
    2. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose borrowed chords.
    3. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose augmented sixth chords.
    4. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose augmented sixth chords used in modulations.
    5. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose chords with extensions.
    6. Demonstrate the importance of practice and study in the acquisition of MUSC&242 student outcomes.
    7. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose harmonic and select non-harmonic principles contributing to style in music.
    8. take dictation in the following areas of ear-training: melodic dictation, error detection in melodies, identify scale degrees, identify intervals, identify chord progressions, four-part harmonic dictation, harmonic rhythm, non-harmonic tones, rhythm dictation, and error detection in rhythms.
  
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    MUSC& 243 Music Theory VI (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly MUSIC 214 - CCN

    Prerequisite MUSC& 242  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    Includes the study of 20th century harmony including pandiatonic, atonal, serial and other systems of composoition and analysis. Includes aural skills. Piano skills equal to or above the intermediate level (MUSC 182) are highly recommended.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose the fundamental principles of instrumental writing.
    2. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose Impressionistic harmonic principles (i.e., whole-tone and pentatonic scales.
    3. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose medieval modes.
    4. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose quartal and quintal harmony.
    5. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose select aspects of 20th-century music after Debussy.
    6. Play, sing, analyze, dictate, notate, spell, discuss and/or compose select concepts studied throughout the year.
    7. Demonstrate the importance of practice and study in the acquisition of MUSC&243 student outcomes.
    8. Show how harmonic and select non-harmonic principles contributing to style in music.
    9. Take dictation in the following areas of ear-training: melodic dictation, error detection in melodies, identify scale degrees, identify intervals, identify chord progressions, four-part harmonic dictation, harmonic rhythm, non-harmonic tones, rhythm dictation, and error detection in rhythms.

Natural Science

  
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    NSCI 150 Nature (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The emphasis of the course is to identify the major life forms found in a specific area or region including native and introduced species, and their adaptations to the environment. The course focuses on the observation of nature for both scientific and recreational purposes. Includes lab and field studies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and contrast the properties of life vs. non-life.
    2. Identify the means to determine the differences between the three domains and various kingdoms of life.
    3. Define and identify the terms ecosystem, biome, niche, habitat, trophic pyramid, food web, succession, evolution, natural selection, and other terms / words specific to the instructor’s course design emphasizing ecological awareness.
    4. Define the fundamental characteristics of trophic levels, food pyramids, and food webs.
    5. Identify common species of organisms via physical and written identification means.
    6. Demonstrate an increased awareness of environmental interactions and specific life forms.
    7. Define and identify the scientific method, emphasizing the difference between objective and subjective study and test-based understanding.
    8. Recognize and evaluate the impact of exotic or introduced species upon endemic species.
    9. Apply a basic understanding of genetics to environmental issues as genetically modified and recombined life forms.
    10. Determine the taxonomic categories of life forms.
    11. List and categorize the characteristics of the various ecosystems which make up a biome in order to identify the ecosystems and biomes of the studied area or region.
  
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    NSCI 160 Environmental Biology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Interrelationship of humans, animals, plants, soil, water and air. Application to contemporary environmental problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify contagious diseases that plague life on earth, and how they can be “eliminated”.
    2. Identify the term “poverty”, its complications and causes, and the various ways to eliminate it.
    3. Define the thoughts behind and the underlying hypothesis of Gaia.
    4. Be able to relay, through layperson understandings, introductory chemistry functions/terms (ex. atom, bonds, macromolecules, water properties).
    5. Demonstrate awareness of the environment, biomes, and ecosystems the students inhabit on this vast planet (in the biosphere sense), and the niche they fill as responsible inhabitants.
    6. Demonstrate increased awareness of ecological principles and their importance to current human affairs.
    7. Correctly use basic techniques for detecting the individuality of an ecosystem as a basis of perceiving environmental changes.
    8. Define the two laws of thermodynamics and apply them to the fundamental operation of food webs and communities and approaches in solving an ecological crisis.
    9. Define the fundamental structures and functions of a food web, food pyramid, and trophic levels.
    10. Differentiate between environmentally editorialized and scientifically objective printed and verbal stands through the media.
    11. Identify and contrast between the major ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest (land, sea, freshwater, and brackish water).
    12. Identify and contrast between the major biomes of the Pacific Northwest and Earth.
    13. Trace the natural cycles of planet Earth in the earth’s three abiotic components: hydrosphere, lithosphere, and atmosphere, with applications to human involvement.
    14. Explain the process of population / fertility control, growth, and extinction, and apply these processes to approach the current, past, and future potential population problems of the various biota of Earth (Humans included).
    15. Discuss key issues concerning social problems and potential solutions with water, land, agricultural, economic, and air management topics via environmental concerns.
    16. Identify and define pollution via its causes, its’ effects (primary and secondary) in current, past, and future concerns/repercussions with both earth’s abiotic, and biotic areas.
    17. Identify the potential causes and repercussions of global warming.
    18. Identify key government and social environmental causes/groups which influence environmental concerns.
    19. Describe who Rachel Carson is and expand upon her importance to the field of environmental science.
    20. Identify means of recycling, waste management, and environmental responsibility issues pertaining to clean up techniques.
    21. Identify personal habitats “artificial” to the earth (home, school, work), and their local ecosystems that they and the human built structures (housing highways, autos, etc.) influenced through both positive and negative means.
    22. Differentiate between the terms: endemic, introduced and native, pertaining to flora and fauna, and the effects of introduced organisms to an ecosystem.
    23. Describe and identify differences between the domains and kingdoms of life on earth.
    24. Differentiate between the terms developed and undeveloped nations/countries.
    25. Describe the structure and function of DNA. Use this understanding to explain the use of genetically modified foods on the earth, what they are, and what repercussions of their use may have.
  
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    NSCI 300 Inquiry Based Science for Teachers (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    An overview of the main concepts in natural science for early childhood teachers including topics in earth/space science, life science, physical science, and engineering design. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use the Crosscutting Concepts as an organizational framework for connecting core ideas across the earth and space sciences, the life sciences, physical sciences, and engineering design.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of life science, physical sciences, and earth sciences needed to support the scientific exploration of children from birth through grade three.
    3. Apply knowledge of processes, skills, technologies, and resources to explore and understand science content and phenomena.
    4. Conduct investigations to answer scientific questions or solve engineering problems using the scientific method in earth sciences, life sciences, physical science, and engineering.
    5. Describe the relationship between engineering and science in order to plan and implement a comprehensive science curriculum.
    6. Explain the interactions between culture and science, identify the contributions of diverse individuals to the development of science and technology, and describe how science and technology have affected individuals, cultures, and societies throughout human history.
    7. Create an inquiry-based lesson plan for children from birth through grade three using the content knowledge learned in this course and the Washington State Early Learning and Development Guidelines or the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Nursing

  
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    NURS 141 Foundations of Nursing (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    Course Description
    Concepts and theories basic on the art and science of the nursing role with an emphasis on health promotion across the lifespan. Includes program’s philosophy of nursing, nursing history, patient needs, safety, communication, and teaching/learning with an emphasis on critical thinking.

    Student Outcomes
    1) Define nursing theory and processes used to identify normal health in individuals across the lifespan.
    2) Create a plan of care
    3) Describe the difference in nursing roles in a variety of professional health care environments
    4) Describe nursing concepts in accordance with acceptable nursing standard
    5) Identify and describe strategies for learning about the outcomes of care in the clinical practice setting
    6) Identify and explain nursing principles of safe practice
    7) State the advances of modern technology, such as electronic health records, and their impact on the healthcare environment
  
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    NURS 142 Foundations of Nursing Skills Lab (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    Course Description
    Nursing skills needed to assist individuals in meeting basic human needs. Includes a focus on assessments of patients across the lifespan, formulating nursing diagnoses, and documentation related to selected alterations discussed in Foundations of Nursing, with an emphasis on common nursing psychomotor skills.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate a full head-to-toe assessment on an adult patient using patient-centered care
    2. List examples of how team functioning impacts safety and quality of care
    3. Perform foundational nursing care and clinical skills/procedures for adult patients within acceptable nursing standards
    4. Define the process for quality improvement in the patient care setting
    5. Identify effective use of strategies to reduce risk of harm to self or others
    6. Recognize technology and information management tools to support safe processes of care including protecting patient health information
    7. Observe functions within an electronic health record to communicate, manage, support decision making, and document care received by patients
 

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