2018-2019 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Oct 30, 2020  
2018-2019 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Prefixes


COURSE PREFIXES

PREFIX DEPARTMENT
ACCT ACCOUNTING
ASL AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
ANTH ANTHROPOLOGY
ART ART
ASTR ASTRONOMY
ATMOS ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
BIOL BIOLOGY
BUS BUSINESS
BTECA/BTECM BUSINESS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
MNGT BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
CHEM CHEMISTRY
COLLG COLLEGE SUCCESS
CMST COMMUNICATION STUDIES
CIS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CNE COMPUTER NETWORK ENGINEERING
CONST CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
CJ CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CS COMPUTER SCIENCE
DHYG DENTAL HYGIENEDDSGN
DDSGN DIGITAL DESIGN
DRMA DRAMA
ECED EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECON ECONOMICS
EDUC EDUCATION
EMT EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
ENGR ENGINEERING
ENGL ENGLISH
ENVS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
FASH FASHION MERCHANDISING
FCA FIRE COMMAND
FRCH FRENCH
GEOG GEOGRAPHY
GEOL GEOLOGY
GERM GERMAN
HIST HISTORY
HSEM HOMELAND SECURITY
HSCI HEALTH SCIENCES
HSSA HUMAN SERVICES SUBSTANCE ABUSE
HUM HUMANITIES
INFO INFORMATION STUDIES
INTS INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
ISS INTEGRATED SOCIAL SCIENCE
JAPN JAPANESE
JOURN JOURNALISM
KINS KINESIOLOGY
KREA KOREAN
MATH MATHEMATICS
MUSC MUSIC
NSCI NATURAL SCIENCE
NURS NURSING
NAC NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFIED
NUTR NUTRITION
OSH OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
OCEA OCEANOGRAPHY
PHIL PHILOSOPHY
PE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PS PHYSICAL SCIENCE
PHYS PHYSICS
POLS POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSYC PSYCHOLOGY
READ READING
RUSS RUSSIAN
SSMH SOCIAL SERVICE MENTAL HEALTH
SOC SOCIOLOGY
SPAN SPANISH
VT VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

 

 
  
  •  

    BTECA 205 Office Procedures (3 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 205

    A course designed for students who wish to learn and practice necessary skills for employment in today’s office. Students receive instruction in telephone communications, use of electronic information software, processing travel and meeting documents, time management and use of personal productivity software.
  
  •  

    BTECA 245 Cooperative Work Experience I (3 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 245

    Emphasis on relating and applying the skills and attitudes learned in college to the workplace. Students complete a 90-hour internship, working part time in an office setting related to their chosen Business Information Technology program(s). The students regularly discuss job-related issues. Professional liability insurance required for this course. See instructor for more information.
  
  •  

    BTECA 246 Cooperative Work Experience II (3 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 246

    Prereq: Completion or concurrent enrollment in BTECA 245 .

    Students work in an office setting related to their chosen Business Information Technology program(s). Emphasis continues from BTECA 245  on practicing the skills and attitudes learned in their college courses. Professional liability insurance required for this course. See instructor for more information.
  
  •  

    BTECA 248 Business Information Technology Seminar I (2 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 248

    Prereq: Enrollment in a Business Information Technology program.

    Provides student with job search strategies, including preparation of resumes, cover letters, interviewing strategies, professional appearance and telephone techniques.
  
  •  

    BTECA 249 Business Information Technology Seminar II (2 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 249

    Prereq: Enrollment in a Business Information Technology program.

    A seminar course for students in the Business Information Technology program emphasizing human relations skills to include leadership, assertiveness, handling criticism, conflict resolution, office politics and diversity in the workplace.
  
  •  

    BTECA 250 Business Communications (5 credits)


    Formerly: BUS 250

    Prereq: Grade of 2.0 or better in BTECA 115  or ENGL& 101 .

    Theory and practice in composing, evaluating and analyzing written and oral business communications. Emphasizes effective writing of business letters and reports, the psychology of business writing, methods of research and oral reports.
  
  •  

    BTECM 149 Introduction to the Medical Office (5 credits)


    Formerly BTECH 149

    An interpersonal networking course for medical office students including discussion, guest speakers and assignments related to topics such as the medical environment, medical staff, medical ethics and law and the healthcare-related job market.
  
  •  

    BTECM 150 Medical Terminology I (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 150

    Fundamentals of medical terminology, including prefixes, suffixes, root words and basic rules, upon which the student will build a medical vocabulary. Includes basic anatomy and physiology for the medical office worker.
  
  •  

    BTECM 151 Medical Terminology II (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 151

    A continuation of BTECM 150  to build on the student’s medical vocabulary by learning advanced terminology and body systems. Includes basic anatomy and physiology for the medical office worker.
  
  •  

    BTECM 244 Medical Office Simulation (3 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 244

    Prereq: Permission from a Business Information Technology Instructor.

    A capstone service learning course primarily focused on the cumulative application of skills of a medical office assistant including professional networking for future employment.
  
  •  

    BTECM 250 Medical Forms and Referral Management (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 250

    Emphasis on the production of the many forms required for insurance billing, including: CMS-1500, UB-92, referrals and referral requests. Includes documentation guidelines and completion of medical claim forms for (including, but not limited to): Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, Worker’s Compensation, Labor and Industries.
  
  •  

    BTECM 254 CPT Coding (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 254

    Basic procedural coding for medical office and hospital billing. Students will learn the American Medical Association’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding system and how to legally and ethically apply the system to various healthcare settings.
  
  •  

    BTECM 255 Diagnosis Coding (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 255

    Basic procedural coding for medical office and hospital billing. Students will learn entry-level current International Classification of Diseases, current revision and Clinical Modification coding for physician’s offices and outpatient healthcare facilities.
  
  •  

    BTECM 256 Advanced Billing and Coding (5 credits)


    Formerly: BTECH 256

    Prereq: BTECM 254  or BTECM 255  with a grade of 2.0.

    Advanced application of both diagnosis and procedural outpatient coding as well as the business of coding and billing. Students build their coding knowledge and skill through intensive coding practice and practical experience using the international classification of diseases, current revision, clinical modification, current procedural terminology, and health care common procedure coding system manuals and applying those concepts to complex coding scenarios.
  
  •  

    BTECM 257 Electronic Health Records (5 credits)


    This course will prepare students for the management of health information through the use of electronic health records. Students will complete common work tasks and practice data entry while creating a variety of electronic medical records (EMRs) in both inpatient and outpatient settings using training software. The course will also provide background on existing and evolving government-driven standards and regulations as they apply to the healthcare environment.
  
  •  

    BUS& 101 Introduction to Business (5 credits)


    GER-SS
    Basic background in general fields of business. An examination of the nature of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in a free market economy. An overview of: marketing, management, finance, production, economics, information systems and international commerce.
  
  •  

    BUS 134 Introduction to Social Media (5 credits)


    Students explore emerging social media technologies and processes and study their application in a variety of contemporary organization and business settings. Students will explore how businesses evaluate and use social media as well as how to use and author content for online tools such as blogs, microblogs, collaboration mechanisms, podcasts, RSS feeds, video, bookmarking and other emerging web technologies. The course will also study how to use these technologies to monitor conversations on the Internet, engage online communities, identify influencers and establish thought leadership.
  
  •  

    BUS 135 Introduction to Online Marketing (5 credits)


    How organizations use online marketing strategies including websites, media sharing, social media networking, search engine optimization and online advertising to market goods and services.
  
  •  

    BUS& 201 Business Law (5 credits)


    GER-SS
    Prereq: ENGL& 101  , or BTECA 115 , with a 2.0 grade or better or instructor permission.

     

     

    Introduction to the nature of law and the resolution of disputes in the court system, and overview of law typically relating to the operation of businesses from the perspectives of their owners, managers, employees, customers and suppliers; primary emphasis is on the law pertaining to various types of contracts.

  
  •  

    BUS 240 Human Relations in the Workplace (5 credits)


    This course considers how the needs of business or other formal organizations interact with individual needs, leadership styles, formal organizational policies and procedures and general cultural patterns to determine how human beings act in work situations.
  
  •  

    BUS 245 Global Business (5 credits)


    Introduction and essentials for the student interested in pursuing the study of international trade and culture.
  
  •  

    BUS 260 Project Management I: Planning (5 credits)


    Prereq: Grade of 2.0 or better in BTECA 115  or ENGL& 101 .

    Introduce project management best practices from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). Introduce project management Initiate and Plan Process Groups framework, terminology, concepts, the tools and techniques to build a project plan. Part one of a two-part series.
  
  •  

    BUS 261 Project Management II: Managing (5 credits)


    Prereq: BUS 260 .

    A continuation of the study of project management best practices from the Project Management Institute (PMI®) in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). Introduce project management Execute, Monitor/Control and Close Process Groups framework, terminology, concepts and the tools and techniques to build a project plan. Introduce the fundamentals of a project management scheduling tool. Part two of a two-part series.
  
  •  

    BUS 279 Personal Finance and Money Management (5 credits)


    Offered through Military sites only.

    A practical course in managing personal finances. Course includes budgeting, home ownership, income tax, investments, insurance, wills and trusts.

  
  •  

    CHEM& 100 Preparatory Chemistry (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Introductory course in chemistry for students intending to take CHEM& 121  and CHEM& 131 . Discussion of basic chemical concepts including atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding and chemical nomenclature.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 110 Chemical Concepts with Lab (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    The relationship of basic chemical concepts to issues in modern society will be discussed. Intended for non-science majors.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 121 Intro to Chemistry (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 100 , high school chemistry or instructor permission. MATH 096  or MATH 098  or concurrent enrollment in MATH 098  and recommended for ENGL 101  on placement tests.

    An introduction to general chemistry for health professionals or as chemical background for further studies in chemistry. Topics covered include unit conversions, atomic structures, periodic properties, chemical bonds, basic stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, equilibrium, acid/base chemistry and oxidation/reduction. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 131 Intro to Organic/Biochemistry (6 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 121  

    Continuation of CHEM& 121 . The course includes an introduction to organize functional groups and a study of carbohydrates, optical isomerism, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and metabolism. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 139 General Chemistry Prep (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: MATH 098  or placement above MATH 098.

    Designed to introduce the science major student to mathematical and chemical principles needed for a successful experience in their science studies. Includes problem solving, graphs, calculator use, atomic structure, periodic properties, inorganic nomenclature, the mole, balancing equations and stoichiometry. Non-lab course.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 161 General Chemistry with Lab I (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 139  or a year of High School chemistry and MATH& 141  (which may be taken concurrently) or instructor permission.

    The first quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers measurements, significant figures, dimensional analysis, fundamentals of atomic structure, stoichiometry, reactions, gas laws, thermochemistry and an introduction to solutions. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 162 General Chemistry with Lab II (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 161  or instructor permission.

    The second quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers bonding theory, molecular structures, states of matter, quantum theory, periodic properties, atomic structure, intermolecular forces and an introduction to the second law of thermodynamics. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 163 General Chemistry with Lab III (5 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 162  or instructor permission.

    The last quarter of a three-quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers kinetics, equilibrium, oxidation/reduction reactions, acids and bases, slightly soluble salts, entropy and free energy and electrochemistry. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 261 Organic Chemistry with Lab I (6 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 163  or instructor’s permission.

    The first quarter of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, designed for science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Structure, nomenclature, physical properties, reactions and synthesis of the main types of organic compounds. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 262 Organic Chemistry with Lab II (6 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 261  or instructor permission.

    The second quarter of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, designed for science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Further discussion of the properties and transformations of organic molecules. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CHEM& 263 Organic Chemistry with Lab III (6 credits)


    GER-NS
    Prereq: CHEM& 262  or instructor permission.

    The third quarter of a three-quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Further discussion of the properties and transformations of organic molecules, including bio-molecules. Lab included.
  
  •  

    CIS 103 Online Learning: Getting Started (2 credits)


    Prereq: Regular access to the Internet; familiarity with Web and email.

    Through an introductory online experience, the student will learn about how courses work and the personal preparation required for successful learning. Topics covered include technical preparation, navigating the course environment, relationships and how online learning differs from face-to-face instruction. The class will help students identify when and how online learning is best incorporated into their educational activities.
  
  •  

    CIS 110 Introduction to Microcomputer Business Applications (3 credits)


    An abbreviated version of CIS 121  designed specifically for non-CIS/DDSGN majors. Introduction to the fundamentals of a computer, including the information processing cycle. Survey of computer technology, computer nomenclature and the use of computers as productivity tools. Lab assignments using current microcomputer-based application programs allow the student to interact with computer technology, hardware and Internet.
  
  •  

    CIS 121 Introduction to Computer Information Systems (5 credits)


    Introduction to the fundamentals of a computer, including the information processing cycle. Survey of computer technology, computer nomenclature and the use of computers as productivity tools. Students will develop an understanding of personal computers and emphasize their use as both stand-alone and networked systems. Current microcomputer-based application programs and higher-level programming language exercises and lab assignments allow each student to interact with computer technology, hardware, Internet and concepts of common application programs.
  
  •  

    CIS 122 Introduction to Computer Programming (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 121  and MATH 096  or MATH 098  with a 2.0 or above or instructor permission.

    Introduction to the concepts of computer program analysis, design and development using modern structured programming methodologies and techniques. Involves structure charts, pseudocode and flowcharts. Common computer program techniques of documentation, testing and validation, and implementation using the systems development life cycle (SDLC) model, and lab assignments to allow the student to interact with computer technology, hardware and concepts.
  
  •  

    CIS 123 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP) (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 122  with 2.0 or higher or instructor permission.

    Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (OOP). Application of the concepts of inheritance, polymorphism, interfaces and abstract classes. Addresses classes, objects and methods utilizing top down design, model-view controller and other maintainability/ modularization/and reusability techniques. Techniques for effective program coding; testing and establishing error handling techniques.
  
  •  

    CIS 130 Productivity Software (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 110  or CIS 121  each with a grade of at least 2.0 or instructor permission.

    Learn four of the most popular software applications used for word processing, spreadsheet, database management and presentation and note taking purposes using various local and cloud-based storage.
  
  •  

    CIS 134 Computer Operating Systems (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 121  with a 2.0 grade or better or instructor permission.

    Introduction to the function and use of command line and graphical user interface (GUI)-based computer operating systems. A combination of classroom discussion and hands-on lab exercises provides practical knowledge and experience in various operating system features.
  
  •  

    CIS 136 Spreadsheet Applications (3 credits)


    Prereq: MATH 096  or higher; or instructor permission.

    This course introduces basic spreadsheet design and development. Topics will include creation and manipulation of spreadsheets, conversion to charts and graphs and creation of macros.
  
  •  

    CIS 185 Intermediate Object Oriented Programming (OOP) (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 123  and CIS 260  both with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Addresses Dot Net objects using unified modeling language; classes and applying objects within an assembly; web services concepts and Active Server Pages; complex window forms to interface within desktop applications using controls and events including menu and keyboard handling; Window forms that access data from various back end databases and program threads.
  
  •  

    CIS 210 Business Analysis (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 121   with 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    A study of the Business Analyst profession and generally accepted best practices. This course addresses analysis of the business environment, definition of stakeholder needs and recommendation for IT solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals.
  
  •  

    CIS 215 Client-Side Web Development (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 122   with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Addresses Web forms utilizing HTML; dynamic client-side Web forms that utilize JavaScript and JQuery; server-side code that can receive, process and return Extensible Markup Language (XML) data from the client-side; relevant object models and creation of multiple forms to move data; Web forms that utilize techniques such as cascading style sheets; separation of the presentation and application layers; error handling; Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and Representational State Transfer (REST).
  
  •  

    CIS 216 Server-Side Web Development (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 123   and CIS 215 , both with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    This course covers the fundamental concepts of server-side web development using ASP.NET, through practical application. Topics will include using session state, connecting web pages to a database and using error handling.
  
  •  

    CIS 260 Database Management Systems (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 122 , or concurrent, with 2.0 or above, or instructor permission.

    Concepts, theory, analysis and design of relational database management systems (RDBMS). This project-based class explores Entity Relationship modeling and database design fundamentals. Practical application includes case study analysis within the healthcare industry and comparison to other industries as applicable.
  
  •  

    CIS 261 Structured Query Language (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 122  or CIS 123 , and CIS 260 , each with 2.0 or better (may be taken concurrently); or instructor permission.

    Introduction to Structured Query Language (SQL), the industry-standard language for storing, retrieving, displaying and updating data in a relational database. Includes an introduction to extensions to standard SQL such as a procedural language extension such as Procedural Language-SQL PL/SQL or Transact-SQL (T-SQL).
  
  •  

    CIS 262 Database Administration Backup and Recovery (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 260  and CIS 261 , each with 2.0 or above, or instructor permission.

    This course addresses the key tasks and functions required of a database administrator in a production environment. Students will gain experience creating and implementing a database, managing data, expanding the size of the database, implementing basic security and data integrity measures and granting data access privileges to individual users.
  
  •  

    CIS 264 CIS Project Capstone (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 262   and CIS 269  both with 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Project-based capstone course. Students will demonstrate proficiency of prior core course outcomes by analyzing, designing, developing, implementing and evaluating a real-life data driven application project using one or more software development life cycles.
  
  •  

    CIS 265 Data Communications and Networks (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 134  with a grade of at least 2.0 or instructor permission.

    An introduction to data communication and network terminology, operating concepts, network design, hardware and software. Reviews the Open System Interconnection (OSI) model as well as other major data communication models and the various specifications and standards for data communications hardware and software. Addresses the advantages and disadvantages of various network systems and their availability, flexibility and performance. Participate in the design of a data communications network.
  
  •  

    CIS 269 Advanced SQL Programming and Tuning (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 261  with 2.0 or better; or instructor permission.

    An advanced course in Structure Query Language (SQL). Students will develop script files, stored procedures and procedural language units, as well as diagnose and tune performance problems.
  
  •  

    CIS 270 Wireless Networking (5 credits)


    Prereq: CNE 242  with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    This course introduces Radio Frequency (RF) and 802.11 technology essentials along with installing, configuring, monitoring and basic troubleshooting tasks needed to support small to medium business and enterprise wireless networks.
  
  •  

    CIS 275 Business Analytics/Intelligence (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 261  and CIS 136 , both with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor permission.

    Practical application developing business intelligence (BI) solutions, including data cleansing, Extract Transform Load (ETL), and Data Warehouse implementation. BI tools will be used for reporting (SSRS), integration (SSIS) and analysis (SSAS). Cubes and marts will be created to feed presentation layers for dashboards and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) providing needed user analytics.
  
  •  

    CIS 280 Systems Analysis and Design (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS 210  with 2.0 or above; or instructor permission.

    This course introduces students to a systematic approach to defining needs, creating specifications and designing information systems. Course discussion and hands-on case studies providing practical knowledge and experience. Waterfall and agile systems analysis and design techniques will be used to develop and document effective computer-based information systems projects. Students will also learn project management standards and create project plans using currently available project management application software.
  
  •  

    CIS 290 Supervised Internship (5 credits)


    Prereq: CIS majors only with instructor or CIS program coordinator permission.

    This course allows the student to gain relevant experience working in a local business environment. Requires 250 hours of supervised work including associated resume preparation, job interviews and internship documentation.
  
  •  

    CJ 102 Introduction to Criminal Law (5 credits)


    Basic introduction to the elements of criminal law and justice in the United States.
  
  •  

    CJ 103 Criminal Justice: Success Seminar (1 credit)


    An introduction to the elements needed to be successful in the two-year and certificate(s) programs at Pierce College. This course will prepare students for the intricacies of Pierce College and prepare them for their culminating portfolio project.
  
  •  

    CJ& 105 Corrections in America (5 credits)


    GER-SS
    (formerly CJ 140)

    A study of the theories and practices in the correctional field in the United States. Surveys programs, issues and trends relating to the corrections field, including state and federal legislation and employment prospects.
  
  •  

    CJ 112 Criminal Justice in America (5 credits)


    GER-SS
    An examination of the Criminal Justice system with specific emphasis on the theories and principles of criminology; programs, issues and trends relating to the criminal justice system; structures, functions and actors of the United States, state and federal courts; and the impact of state and federal legislation.
  
  •  

    CJ 115 Juvenile Justice System (5 credits)


    GTE
    A historical and ideological examination of the juvenile justice system in the United States: analysis of policies, practices, laws, treatments, rights, current research, partner agencies and their impact upon crime, juveniles and the community.
  
  •  

    CJ 120 Constitutional Rights (5 credits)


    GTE
    An examination of the evolution and current judicial interpretation of the first, second, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth and fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. Compare and contrast the basic principles and theoretical foundations of Constitutional Law versus Restorative Justice.
  
  •  

    CJ 128 Criminal Justice Wellness (5 credits)


    An introductory course designed to build the physical requirements for work in criminal justice agencies through the application of personal wellness plans.
  
  •  

    CJ 130 Criminal Justice Operational Skills (5 credits)


    Prereq: Instructor permission.

    Identification of practical applications for solutions to frequent criminal justice tasks and problems. Emphasizes use of information gathering, communications, problem solving and decision-making skills.
  
  •  

    CJ 131 Security Practices (5 credits)


    Prereq: Student must be enrolled in the Corrections/Protections Officer and Correctional Careers Program taught at the Fort Steilacoom campus.

    A critical examination of the written policies and practical applications relevant to security practices in local, state and federal detention centers. This class requires multiple detention center tours. Students must pass criminal history checks. This class is only taught at the Fort Steilacoom campus as part of the Corrections/Protection Officer and Correctional Careers Program.
  
  •  

    CJ 132 Correctional Practices (5 credits)


    Prereq: Successful completion of the first session of the Corrections/Protection Officer and Correctional Careers Program. Criminal History checks are required to enter into the program.

    An extension of interpersonal communications that includes conflict resolution for the corrections/protection field.
  
  •  

    CJ 144 Corrections Special Populations and Case Management (5 credits)


    An examination of specific correctional populations, their impact on the correctional systems and current correctional case management practices, theories, public policies, strategies and techniques.
  
  •  

    CJ 150 Policing in America (5 credits)


    GTE
    An examination of the history, philosophy and current practices of policing, including the social, political, organizational and legal environments where the police perform their roles in the United States.
  
  •  

    CJ 200 Crime and Justice in America: Issues (5 credits)


    GTE
    Prereq: ENGL& 101 

    This course examines issues of social justice and privilege (race, gender, class, sexual orientation, etc.) and the effect upon self, clients, systems and public policy.
  
  •  

    CJ 202 Concepts of Criminal Law (5 credits)


    GER-SS
    An analysis of the fundamental concepts of both English Common Law and current statutory criminal law and defenses. To include: scope and nature of law; classification of offense; acts and intents and elements of major criminal statutes.
  
  •  

    CJ 205 Investigative Technology (5 credits)


    An analysis of the history of crime science investigations, practical use of technical equipment and scientific methods to assist in crime detection. This includes fingerprint identification, fingerprinting, casting, sketching and crime scene photography.
  
  •  

    CJ 215 Drugs and Society (5 credits)


    GTE
    An analysis of political and social conditions, drug trafficking, laws and current treatment philosophies regarding drug use, abuse, addiction and recovery.
  
  •  

    CJ 220 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (2 credits)


    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in Criminal Justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.
  
  •  

    CJ 221 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)


    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in Criminal Justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.
  
  •  

    CJ 222 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (4 credits)


    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in Criminal Justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.
  
  •  

    CJ 223 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (5 credits)


    A critical examination of the written materials and practical applications relevant to current/critical issues in Criminal Justice and their impact on the criminal justice system and society. The specific topic(s) vary from quarter to quarter.
  
  •  

    CJ 224 Victimology and Advocacy (5 credits)


    An overview of current victim issues, laws, resources, treatments, recovery and advocacy for victims of crime and other social problems.
  
  •  

    CJ 226 Criminal Justice Response to Terrorism (5 credits)


    A course designed to familiarize students with the basics of terrorism, the history, laws and recent issues and criminal justice responses to terrorism in the 21st Century.
  
  •  

    CJ 227 Funding and Program Development for Crime Prevention (5 credits)


    A course designed to familiarize students with the basics of the grant funding process for social programs (state and federal), and how to develop a prevention idea into a program that can be funded and measured.
  
  •  

    CJ 228 Community Emergency Response Teams (2 credits)


    Basic skills needed to respond to a community’s and individual’s immediate needs in the aftermath of a disaster when emergency services are not immediately available.
  
  •  

    CJ 245 Introduction to Investigation and Evidence (5 credits)


    GTE
    Prereq: CJ 112 

    A survey of the laws governing the admission of evidence, federal rules of evidence, requirements for presenting and ensuring the reliability of various types of evidence (such as witness competence, questioning, objections, best evidence requirements for documents, exceptions, exclusions, etc.). Analysis of case decisions on the collection and presentation of evidence in criminal trials, and the application of laws to the law enforcement profession.
  
  •  

    CJ 250 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (3 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
  •  

    CJ 251 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (4 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
  •  

    CJ 252 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (5 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
  •  

    CJ 253 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (6 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
  •  

    CJ 254 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (7 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
  •  

    CJ 255 Criminal Justice Work-Based Learning (8 credits)


    Prereq: Program coordinator or instructor approval required.

    On the job experience in a criminal justice agency that allows students to apply criminal justice theories to practice.
  
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    CJ 260 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Explorer/Cadet (5 credits)


    Prereq: Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required.

    A course designed to familiarize students with operational procedures, expectations and competencies of local law enforcement agencies through participation in an approved Law Enforcement Explorer/Cadet program. Professional liability insurance required for this course. See instructor for more information.
  
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    CJ 261 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Reserve (10 credits)


    Prereq: Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required

    A course designed to familiarize students with operational procedures, expectations and competencies needed to obtain “Reserve” status through participation and successful completion of an approved Law Enforcement Reserve academy/ program. Professional liability insurance required for this course. See instructor for more information.
  
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    CJ 262 Law Enforcement Operational Skills: Officer (10 credits)


    Prereq: Must be sponsored by an accredited Law Enforcement Agency and approved by the Criminal Justice Program Coordinator. NCIC/WASIC checks required

    Practical application of knowledge, skills and abilities necessary to serve effectively as an entry level “Law Enforcement Officer.” Law Enforcement Agency sponsorship and Criminal Justice approval required. Professional liability insurance required for this course. See instructor for more information.
  
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    CJ 270 Introduction to Investigative Profiling (5 credits)


    This course is an introduction to the basics of investigative profiling. This course examines the history, main theoretical approaches and methods of investigative profiling.
  
  •  

    CJ 271 Introduction to Crime Analysis and Intelligence (5 credits)


    This introduction to the field of crime analysis covers the crime analysis profession, theory and role of analysis in policing. Additionally, survey of the techniques for the types of crime analysis - tactical, strategic, operational and administrative - is covered.
  
  •  

    CJ 272 Criminal Investigations (5 credits)


    Prereq: Successful completion of CJ 270   and CJ 271   or instructor permission.

    Through the lens of assigned criminal cases, students will explore investigative theory, sources of information, interview and interrogation techniques, false and coerced confessions, crime patterns, criminal law & procedures, the role of an investigator and report writing.
  
  •  

    CJ 273 Crime Mapping Techniques (5 credits)


    Prereq: CJ 270   and CJ 271 , or instructor permission.

    Using data and examples from the crime analysis world, this course introduces students to the fundamental skills necessary to prepare crime maps and conduct spatial analysis for crime analysis projects.
  
  •  

    CJ 274 Criminal Behavior (5 credits)


    Prereq: CJ 273  or instructor permission.

    This course is an examination of psychology of human behavior as it relates to crime. Focuses on the scientific study, psychological bases and dynamics of criminal situations and criminal behavior; major theories of criminal and aggressive behavior; cognitive, psychodynamic, behavioral, social learning, descriptive and developmental theories are discussed and compared with current classification systems. The student will be introduced to psychopathology, the sexually violent offender and serial murder through the profiles of known offenders.
  
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    CJ 275 Advanced Crime Analysis Techniques (5 credits)


    Prereq: CJ 271  and CJ 273 .

    This course encompasses concepts and technical skills across all major types of crime analysis (tactical, strategic, operations and administrative). Students will engage in a series of projects that replicate the analyses and challenges crime analysts regularly encounter.
  
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    CJ 276 Empirical Profiling (5 credits)


    Prereq: CJ 270  and CJ 274 , or instructor permission.

    Psychological principles upon which offender profiling is based will be further explored, including classification of crime scene behavior, behavioral change, and behavioral consistency; application of empirical profiling.
  
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    CJ 277 Applied Crime Analysis Research and Design Methods (5 credits)


    Prereq: CJ 271 , CJ 273 , and CJ 275 .

    This course exposes the student to the experience of developing an original crime analysis project & bringing the project to completion.
  
  •  

    CJ 280 Criminal Justice Culminating Project (1 credit)


    Prereq: Must have taken or be currently completing all core Criminal Justice courses prior to this course. Successful completion of BTECA 130  or proficiency in PowerPoint demonstrated prior to registration. Instructor permission is required.

    Students will complete and deliver to the college and industry personnel their culminating portfolio project which demonstrates student learning of all outcomes (FAK, PTO, and CAO) for all specified criminal justice degree(s) or certificate(s).
 

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