2023-2024 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Jul 20, 2024  
2023-2024 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Add to Portfolio (opens a new window)

ANTH& 216 Northwest Coast Indians (5 credits)



Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
Formerly ANTHR 260-CCN

Course Description
Exploration of the culture and lifeways of Indians of the Northwest Coast culture area, past and present.

Course Content
A. Concept of culture: what it is and how it works
B. Ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, and extreme relativism
C. Ethnographic research methods, field techniques, and ethics
D. Analysis of Northwest Coast Native American cultures which could include Kwakiutl, Tlingit, Tsimshian, Bella Coola, Bella Bella, Haida, Snoqualmie, Puyallup, Nisqually, and the Nootka
E. Northwest Coast Native American cultures, past and present
F. Social/political structure of Northwest Coast Native American cultures
G. Family, kinship, and marriage in Northwest Coast Native American cultures
H. Religion, art, and the aesthetic universe of Northwest Coast Native Americans
I. Subsistence strategies and social ecology of Northwest Coast cultures
J. Contemporary issues for native peoples of the Northwest Coast

Student Outcomes
1. Identify and discuss key concepts within cultural anthropological theory and theoretical perspectives.

2. Discuss social and political pre-history and history of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.

3. Use an ethnographic perspective to identify and discuss the social and political structure of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.

4. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American cultural perspectives on marriage, family, kinship systems, and descent.

5. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American perspectives on political systems, social control, and conflict.

6. Describe Northwest Coast Native American patterns of subsistence and the complexities of social ecology in the Pacific Northwest.

7. Discuss the importance of the potlatch to the social and political structure of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.

8. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American perspectives on religion, art, and the aesthetic universe.

9. Critically evaluate and discuss the complexities of Native American/United States legal relations and relationships.

10. Critically evaluate and discuss issues surrounding and pertaining to Native American sovereignty.

Degree Outcomes
Social Sciences: Graduates analyze and interpret social phenomenon using social science theories and methods.

Intercultural Engagement: Graduates demonstrate self-efficacy in intercultural engagement to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion through reflections and expressions of cultural humility, empathy, and social and civic engagement and action. Further, graduates examine how identities/positionalities such as races, social classes, genders, sexual orientations, disabilities, and cultures impact perceptions, actions, and the distribution of power and privilege in communities, systems, and institutions.

Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking: Graduates will evaluate, analyze, synthesize, and generate ideas; construct informed, meaningful, and justifiable conclusions; and process feelings, beliefs, biases, strengths, and weaknesses as they relate to their thinking, decisions, and creations.

Lecture Contact Hours 50
Lab Contact Hours 0
Clinical Contact Hours 0
Total Contact Hours 50

Potential Methods
A. Examinations
B. Quizzes
C. Individual written assignments / essays
D. Individual or group work in class
E. Research assignments
F. Class presentation
G. Large and small group discussions
H. Group assignments



Add to Portfolio (opens a new window)