2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Aug 08, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Veterinary Technology

  
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    VT 161 Applied Behavior Techniques II (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Culminating course in practical experience in canine and feline behavior. This is the third course in a three course series. The student will apply techniques learned in VT 160 and VT 161 on topics such as common behavioral problems/solutions seen in the veterinary field. The student will work independently and in small groups to socialize and train program dogs and cats.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Independent observation of canine and feline body language and communication.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to work successfully with a variety of dogs and cats with varied temperaments.
    3. Explore a variety of training and conditioning techniques.
    4. Document individual animal progress with conditioning and training.
    5. Create client education information on common dog and cat husbandry and behavior topics.
    6. Participate in Pet Adoption Week to help ensure program animals are adopted out to suitable households.
  
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    VT 162 Applied Behavior Techniques III (1 credit)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Culminating course in practical experience in canine and feline behavior. This is the third course in a three course series. The student will apply techniques learned in VT 160 and VT 161 on topics such as common behavioral problems/solutions seen in the veterinary field. The student will work independently and in small groups to socialize and train program dogs and cats.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Independent observation of canine and feline body language and communication.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to work successfully with a variety of dogs and cats with varied temperaments.
    3. Explore a variety of training and conditioning techniques.
    4. Document individual animal progress with conditioning and training.
    5. Create client education information on common dog and cat husbandry and behavior topics.
    6. Participate in Pet Adoption Week to help ensure program animals are adopted out to suitable households.
  
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    VT 166 Hematology for Veterinary Technicians (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Study of blood formation, including recognition of normal and abnormal blood cells from domestic and exotic animals, and accurate performance of Complete Blood Counts (CBC).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform laboratory skills using infection control techniques and safety requirements.
    2. Identify blood components: plasma, erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets.
    3. Differentiate normal/abnormal hematologic conditions.
    4. Explain the functions of blood.
    5. Describe normal/abnormal appearances of blood components.
    6. Differentiate the five types of leukocytes based on appearance and function.
    7. Compare blood components in a variety of species.
    8. Identify/define key aspects of immunity.
    9. Describe the process of blood component development.
    10. Describe the process of hemostasis and list components needed for coagulation.
    11. Compare and contrast regenerative vs. non-regenerative anemias.
    12. Identify hematologic parasites.
    13. Explain the important components of a blood transfusion.
    14. Demonstrate proper blood smear and staining technique.
    15. Perform and record appropriate tests that make up a Complete Blood Count – manually and by machine.
    16. Identify and differentiate leukocytes on a 100 cell differential.
    17. Use proper terminology and organization for written lab reports.
  
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    VT 215 Animal Hospital Office Procedures (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Veterinary Technology course offering a broad view of typical vet clinic office procedures. Emphasis placed on the role of a veterinary technician in various professional settings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess work situations and apply appropriate ethical and professional behaviors.
    2. Communicate effectively with diverse clientele and staff using professional and effective verbal skills and written communications.
    3. Evaluate and discuss the legalities of confidentiality, patient records and radiographs and various forms and logs.
    4. Perform inventory evaluation and place drug and equipment orders.
    5. Recognize and respond accordingly to the signs of stress and the five stages of grief.
    6. Use proper hospital management skills when drafting policies and procedures, interviewing, scheduling and processing employee evaluations.
    7. Identify the various veterinary medicine regulatory bodies and regulations that govern veterinary technicians.
    8. Recognize OSHA/WISHA guidelines for occupational safety.
    9. Research, compile, and organize data for an oral presentation for client education.
    10. Work in diverse teams to communicate technical information in an informal way to team members, and to resolve conflicts cooperatively.
  
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    VT 220 Public Health and Sanitation (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Lectures on public health as it applies to veterinary medicine and the veterinary technician. Covers epidemiology, zoonoses, environmental public health including meat and food hygiene.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain basic epidemiological concepts in the control and prevention of infectious diseases.
    2. Describe the most common zoonotic diseases in North America.
    3. Characterize the syndrome associated with each zoonotic disease.
    4. Identify the mode of transmission for each zoonotic disease.
    5. Explain the prevention and control strategies for each zoonotic disease.
  
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    VT 223 Applied Equine Techniques (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Advanced equine techniques commonly used in large animal practice, on breeding farms and in horse racing.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Compare and contrast the differences among technician roles in a companion animal practice, a racetrack practice and a breeding farm practice.
    2. Assess personal attributes and skills that are required to be employable in an equine practice.
    3. Address issues of health care, lameness, breeding, surgery, and nursing care using proper terminology.
    4. Describe the normal physiology of the estrous cycle and the methods of dealing with abnormal estrous physiology.
    5. List the physical parameters for a properly anesthetized horse.
    6. Identify recognized safety procedures to be used when working with horses.
    7. Demonstrate equine nursing skills by completing a given checklist of laboratory skills.
  
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    VT 224 Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Principles (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Lecture course covering advanced laboratory principles and techniques in hematology, urinalysis, cytology, bacteriology and parasitology.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the correct performance of lab skills using sterile technique and following all safety requirements.
    2. Distinguish between normal and abnormal parameters in blood chemistry and hematology.
    3. Identify abnormal findings in urine and fecal samples from multiple species.
    4. Discuss urinalysis techniques and findings from chemistry strips and sedimentation.
    5. Discuss common internal and external parasites.
    6. Review proper microbiological techniques to isolate bacteria and perform antibiotic susceptibilities.
    7. Distinguish and report stages of the estrous cycle; perform vaginal cytology.
    8. Research, compile, and organize data for a clinical case scenario.
  
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    VT 230 Anesthesiology (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Small animal anesthesia techniques focusing on agents, administration, and management of the anesthetized patient.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess the health status of animal prior to anesthesia.
    2. Prepare the animal patient for an anesthetic procedure.
    3. Anesthetize the animal using an injectable anesthetic and maintain anesthesia with an inhalant anesthetic.
    4. Respond to medical emergencies during anesthetic procedures.
    5. Describe the process by which general anesthetics induce anesthesia.
    6. Describe the adverse effects of injectable and inhalant anesthetics on the animal.
    7. Explain the human health risks associated with occupational exposure to inhalant anesthetics.
    9. Describe routine care and maintenance of anesthetic equipment.
    10. Explain multimodal pain management techniques.
  
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    VT 233 Veterinary Clinical Practice (14 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    This course provides practical field experience in Veterinary Clinical Practice with a weekly seminar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform routine veterinary technician tasks in a variety of veterinary medical settings
    2. Describe emerging/timely trends in the field of veterinary medicine
    3. Prepare for a job interview by composing a proper resume and by listing appropriate questions to be asked during a job interview
    4. Describe and practice appropriate methods to prevent HIV transmission
    5. Demonstrate personal responsibility by attending work sites and seminars in a timely manner, by participating in work site and classroom activities and by being professionally dressed at all times
  
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    VT 240 Animal Diseases (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Lecture course which covers the fundamentals of animal disease including etiology, nursing care and laboratory procedures which apply to the particular disease syndrome.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the most common diseases affecting domestic dogs and cats.
    2. Correlate signalment, history, and clinical signs with common disease states.
    3. Explain the basis for the use of individual diagnostic tests to identify diseases.
    4. Describe the possible treatment options for common diseases of dogs and cats.
    5. Describe preventative measures to reduce the incidence of common diseases of dogs and cats.
  
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    VT 250 Radiology for Veterinary Technicians (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    A course emphasizing radiography focusing on basic machine structure, fundamental radiographic techniques, correct animal patient restraint and handling, and achievement of technical quality. Includes a discussion of small animal, large animal, and exotic animal techniques, plus an overview of alternative imaging technologies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain how X-rays are produced by the radiographic machine.
    2. Describe how an image is formed on radiographic film.
    3. Identify the radiographic machine components and explain their role in the production of a radiograph.
    4. Take radiographic views of various animal species.
    5. Evaluate radiographs and make the necessary adjustments in technique to produce a diagnostic radiograph.
    6. Describe various ways to reduce personnel’s exposure to radiation when taking a radiograph.
    7. Explain the biologic damage radiation can cause to living tissues.
    8. Observe radiation safety rules when taking radiographs.
    9. Describe alternative imaging technologies used for diagnostic purposes in domestic animals
  
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    VT 251 Pharmacology for Veterinary Technicians (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the pharmacology of commonly used drugs in veterinary medicine. Drugs are grouped by category based on their target organ systems. The indications, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of each drug are discussed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify commonly used groups of drugs in veterinary medicine.
    2. Correctly label and package drugs dispensed in veterinary clinics.
    3. Properly store and dispose of veterinary drugs.
    4. Recognize controlled substances and describe their handling and inventory requirements.
    5. Explain the basic pharmacokinetic process that a drug undergoes in an animal’s body.
    6. Describe normal anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems in an animal’s body.
    7. Explain the mechanism of action of commonly used veterinary drugs.
    8. Recognize adverse drug reactions caused by commonly used veterinary drugs.
    9. Recognize possible drug incompatibilities when administering veterinary drugs to animals.
  
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    VT 252 Special Techniques and Projects (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Selected individual and group assignments covering all technical procedures learned in the Veterinary Technology Program.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    1. Document and demonstrate increased competency in previously learned technical hospital procedures.
    2. Demonstrate capabilities of independent analysis and/or synthesis of and performance on assigned tasks with their own time schedule.
    3. Perform a complete anesthetic procedure on a dog and/or a cat including a physical exam, correctly calculating proper medical dosages, inducing anesthesia, monitoring the animal throughout the entire anesthetic procedure, and safely recovering the patient.
    4. Demonstrate the ability to work in diverse teams, to communicate technical information in an informal way to team members and resolve conflicts cooperatively.
  
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    VT 260 Emergency and Critical Care (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Overview of common small animal emergencies and the role the veterinary technician plays in the management of these patients.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize common small animal emergency presentations.
    2. Prioritize emergency presentations in order of most immediate need.
    3. Understand the role of the veterinary technician in the management of small animal emergencies.
    4. Understand the diagnostic and treatment procedure associated with common small animal emergency presentations.
    5. Recognize changes in the physical condition of the emergency patient.
    6. Perform emergency treatment procedures under the supervision of a veterinarian.
    7. Educate clients on the proper management of the emergency patient prior to presentation.
  
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    VT 265 Clinical Techniques Laboratory (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Second year standing in the Veterinary Technology Program

    Course Description
    Advanced laboratory principles and techniques for veterinary technicians.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Perform lab skills using infection control techniques and following safety requirements.
    2. Document technical hospital procedures.
    3. Demonstrate capabilities of independent analysis and/or synthesis of and performance on assigned tasks.
    4. Demonstrate time management, responsibility, and the ability to work in diverse teams.
    5. Demonstrate proper sample collection, slide preparation, and staining techniques for a variety of samples.
    6. Distinguish between normal and abnormal parameters in blood chemistry and hematology.
    7. Perform complete blood counts and report findings for a variety of species.
    8. Identify abnormal findings in urine and fecal samples from multiple species.
    9. Perform urinalysis and fecal analysis accurately and efficiently.
    10. Identify common parasites from a variety of samples and species.
    11. Grow representative bacterial cultures from samples collected from a variety of sources.
    12. Demonstrate proper microbiological techniques to isolate bacteria and perform antibiotic susceptibilities.
    13. Distinguish and report stages of the estrous cycle, perform vaginal cytology.
    14. Perform a complete anesthetic procedure on a dog and/or a cat.
    15. Calculate proper medical dosages.
    16. Perform a variety of radiologic techniques.
    17. Demonstrate sterile gowning and gloving techniques.
    18. Demonstrate proper surgical pack preparation and handling.
    19. Successfully apply and manage bandages.
    20. Using veterinary management software complete inventory assignments, demonstrate accurate record keeping, and fill prescriptions.
  
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    VT 266 Veterinary Clinical Pathology and Parasitology (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Enrollment in the Associate Degree in Veterinary Technology.

    Course Description
    Clinical laboratory course covering the most common diagnostic laboratory tests conducted in veterinary hospitals. Procedures discussed include fecal examination, urinalysis, blood chemistry tests, cytology, infectious disease tests, and necropsy. Common animal parasites and their life cycles are covered in detail.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe the life cycles of the common internal and external parasites of domestic animals.
    2.Identify the adult, larval and egg stages of common internal and external parasites when presented with a diagnostic sample.
    3.Perform common diagnostic tests for detection of internal and external parasites, including direct fecal smear, fecal flotation, fecal sedimentation, Baermann technique and skin scraping.
    4.Describe treatment and prevention procedures to control internal and external parasites.
    5.Collect the appropriate specimens for laboratory fecal examination, urinalysis, blood chemistry analysis and in-house infectious disease diagnostic tests.
    6.Collect, prepare and evaluate fluid and tissue cytology samples.
    7.Perform a complete urinalysis.
    8.Utilize the blood chemistry analyzer to perform routine diagnostic tests.
    9.Perform in-house diagnostic tests for detection of common infectious diseases of dogs and cats.
    10.Explain the basis for the diagnostic tests performed on urine, blood, body fluids and tissues and the significance of the abnormalities detected.
    11.Perform canine vaginal cytology for estrus determination.
    12.Describe the technique for performing a postmortem examination on an animal cadaver.

World Language

  
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    ASL& 121 American Sign Language I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    A beginning course in American Sign Language using conversational methods. This includes vocabulary related to exchanging personal information, day-to-day common activities, describing family relationships, and providing basic directions. Basic grammar, finger-spelling, numbers 1–100, the fundamentals of spatial agreement, and an introduction to the deaf culture and its history are also introduced.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate receptively and expressively the ability to utilize a vocabulary of 400+ signs to construct basic conversations pertaining to the content of this course, such as: exchanging personal information, including describing basic day-to-day activities, basic family relationships and appearance, traveling to school or work, basic needs, and basic directions of a location or the surroundings.
    2. Research, read, and provide information about ASL history, key historical events and people, and topics that are within the scope of the content of this course.
    3. Interpret and verify basic directions using spatial agreement, including signer’s perspective, real-world orientation, and eye gaze.
    4. Construct basic sentences and questions, and apply NMGM (non-manual grammatical markers) appropriately while asking a yes/no or “wh” question.
    5. Demonstrate the various ways to negotiate a signing environment and how to get others’ attention, such as a wave or a light flicker. 
    6. Construct and comprehend basic sentences using classifiers to show action, size, and shape of a noun.
    7. Request and provide information regarding course content both receptively and expressively.
    8. Generate, translate, and comprehend NMS (non-manual signals) to show meaning. 
    9. Finger-spell using correct palm orientation with a slight shift with some letters to demonstrate basic flow and fluency.
    10. Identify and use the numbers 1–100 in real-life situations for basic counting and ages.
  
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    ASL& 122 American Sign Language II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 121   with at least a 2.0 grade; or 1 year high school equivalent. 

    Course Description
    In ASL& 122, students will continue developing their sign skills while building on vocabulary, enhancing number skills, learning more about classifiers, increasing fluency and incorporating non-manual grammatical markers and non-manual signals with more ease. They will be introduced to basic story telling using these new skills and techniques as well as learn more about deaf culture and grammar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize a vocabulary of 600+ signs in order to participate in and create conversations pertaining to the content of this course, such as: agreement verbs/directional verbs; talking about chores, errands, and activities; identifying and describing people and personal items; and calendar concepts.
    2. Create and demonstrate sentences or questions using cardinal numbers 1–50,000 in context, time, o’clock, money, phone numbers, years, age, miles, MPH, how often, nouns plural, and quantity. 
    3. Construct and retell basic stories using ranking and sequencing, role-shifting, topic-comment, OSV (object-subject-verb) and SVO (subject-verb-object), and rhetorical questions.
    4. Apply and demonstrate the appropriate NMGM and NMS (non-manual grammar markers and non-manual signals) while formulating various types of sentence structures, such as rhetorical questions, and using topic-comment (T-C) statements.
    5. Formulate sentences and questions demonstrating the appropriate use of plain, inflecting, and directional verbs.
    6. Examine and summarize basic information including name signs, audism, negotiating a deaf environment, asking for repetition, looking at unbiased hiring, and identifying well-known names in the deaf community such as Clayton Valli, and other topics that are within the scope of the content of this course.
    7. Practice and broaden use of classifiers while including Pronominal, Locative, Semantic, Perimeter, and Size and Shape Specifiers to show action, placement, movement and/or appearance of the noun. 
    8. Utilize various grammatical structures to include elements to tell a cohesive story, and maintain spatial agreement in order to tell a personal experience story and present to class.
    9. Create and demonstrate using a calendar, including talking about activities with others, including the day of the week, which week (up to 3 weeks in the past or future), and the activity. 
    10. Interpret and translate from ASL to written English while watching stories told by various native signers.
  
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    ASL& 123 American Sign Language III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 122 American Sign Language II (5 credits) ASL& 122 or 2 years high school American Sign Language.

    Course Description
    ASL& 123 focuses on increasing expressive and receptive skills, vocabulary development, additional grammar features, and developing storytelling techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    Participate in advanced beginner to low intermediate level conversations while utilizing a vocabulary of 1000+ signs.
    Apply the use of conjunctions, modals, role shifting, spatial awareness, and rhetorical questions while formulating sentences, questions, and stories.
    Engage in advanced beginner to low intermediate conversations and storytelling using ASL.
    Demonstrate how a sign can vary in meaning depending on the context and use of sign inflections (prosody and aspect). 
    Demonstrate how to use a variety of numbers including age, money, time, the calendar, quantity of a noun, historical information, and time (o’clock) through short scenarios. .
    Develop Deaf cultural awareness through social and relational experiences.
    Translate stories told by various Deaf individuals from ASL to English while noticing the smaller details and subtleties of non-manual-signals (NMS).
  
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    ASL& 221 American Sign Language IV (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 201 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 123 , with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 3 years high school equivalent.

    Course Description
    Emphasis is placed on receptive and expressive skill development and ASL fluency. Attention is given to the correct formation of signs, movement, rhythm, phrasing and clarity. This course includes intensive vocabulary building, a deeper understanding of ASL expressions, and proficiency in ASL grammar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate receptively and expressively the ability to utilize a vocabulary of 1000 + signs to construct and participate in intermediate level conversations.
    2. Create a variety of cohesive stories on various topics while engaging in intermediate use of the language.
    3. Engage in complex conversations using ASL.
    4. Construct and demonstrate examples of how a sign can vary in meaning depending on the context and use of sign inflections.
    5. Interact in more complex conversations related to deaf culture.
    6. Develop deeper cultural awareness through research on various topics that are within the scope of the content of this course and provide information using ASL.
    7. Translate from ASL to English while noticing the smaller details and subtleties of non-manual-signals (NMS).
  
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    ASL& 222 American Sign Language V (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ASL& 221   with at least a 2.0 grade; or 4 years high school equivalent plus placement in ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    The importance of signing with sufficient grammatical accuracy and vocabulary is emphasized. Emphasis is placed on participating effectively in formal and informal conversations on familiar and unfamiliar topics. There will be many opportunities to develop a stronger acceptance and appreciation of the diverse regional aspects of ASL and expand on personal applications of the language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize/draw upon a vocabulary of over 500 signs related to areas of food, careers, the workplace, and the home.
    2. Formulate sentences and questions using a variety of verb types and appropriate NMS and NMGM.
    3. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the grammatical aspects of topicalization and spatialization, including conditional sentences, relative clauses, rhetorical questions, classifiers, and contrastive structure.
    4. Integrate a broader understanding of role shifting and incorporate this skill into retelling an experience.
    5. Utilize a broader breadth of numbers both receptively and expressively in dialogue and narration.
    6. Produce an articulate and well-organized progression of ideas and concepts utilizing sequencing, transitions, and phrasing.
    7. Experience highly fluent ASL provided by native signers. This includes at least 5 receptive translations and 2 copy-sign assignments.
    8. Incorporate a variety of skills learned from the quarter while completing these 2 assignments: retell a children’s story that has a repetitive theme and descriptively translate a visual landscape scenario assignment.
    9. Participate in discussions of deaf culture from literature such as Seeing Language in Sign by Jane Maher and volunteer/interact within the deaf community to broaden understanding of the culture and issues.
  
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    ASL& 223 American Sign Language VI (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ASL& 222   with at least a 2.5 grade. 

    Course Description
    In ASL& 223, emphasis is placed on receptive and expressive skill development including discourse structures used in discussing a variety of topics, spontaneous conversations, and story-telling. The course will encourage vocabulary review, clear articulation of the language, continued practice of grammar structures, exposure to a variety of signing styles, and a deeper cultural awareness about interacting effectively in the Deaf community.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize/draw upon a vocabulary of over 500 signs related to areas of sports, travel, politics, theater/drama, occupations, education, and various spontaneous topics.
    2. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the grammatical aspects of topicalization, conditional sentences, relative clauses, rhetorical questions, contrastive structure, classifiers, using modified verbs (such as continuous aspect), and non-verb agreement.
    3. Produce an articulate and well-organized progression of ideas and concepts utilizing sequencing, transitions, and phrasing.
    4. Participate in discussions of deaf culture from literature such as Forbidden Signs by Douglas Baynton, and Never the Twain Shall Meet by Richard Winefield and volunteer/interact within the deaf community to broaden understanding of the culture and issues.
    5. Utilize real-world situations on a variety of topics both structured and spontaneous to demonstrate an enhanced ability to adjust sign styles depending on register.
    6. Incorporate key elements while telling a story including placement of characters or objects, movement of characters or objects, maintaining continuity, transitions, character development, and special features.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to accurately and clearly reproduce rote memorization of ASL passages provided by native signers and provide more detailed translations of ASL narratives into English narratives.
    8. Utilize a broader breadth of numbers both receptively and expressively in dialogue and real-world situations including finances, ratios, fractions, and percentages.
    9. Actively participate in the Deaf community attending events, socializing, and networking.
  
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    CHIN& 121 Chinese I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHNSE 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first year sequential course to help the student acquire the ability to speak, read, and write Chinese.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Pronounce Chinese syllables, words, phrases and simple sentences. B,D
    2.Read and write the Pinyin transcription system. A,B,C,D
    3.Use a basic vocabulary of 300 words with functional pronunciation, A,B,C,D,E
    4.Use basic Chinese sentence structure. A,B,D,E
    5.Introduce self and others, greet others, and exchange simple personal information. A,B,D,E
    6.Exchange simple statements and questions about daily activities. A,B,D,E
    7.Make and respond to simple suggestions and proposals. A,B,D,E
    8.Exchange information concerning money, time, and dates. A,B,D,E
    9.Read and write 50 Chinese characters. A,E
    10.Explain and discuss Chinese holidays and festivals in English. A,E
  
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    CHIN& 122 Chinese II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHNSE 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHIN& 121  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructors permission.

    Course Description
    The second quarter of a first year sequential course designed to help the student acquire the ability to speak, read, and write Chinese.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Use the skills learned in Chinese 101 with greater speed and accuracy. A,B,C,D,E
    2.Use a vocabulary of 800 words (cumulative) A,B,C,D,E
    3.Demonstrate improved listening and pronunciation A,B,C,D,E
    4.Understand and use standard sentence structure, including simple subordinate clauses. A,B,D,E
    5.Discuss food, travel, and study A,B,D,E
    6.Discuss location of and direction to stores, schools, buildings, and city features. A,B,D,E
    7.Read and write 120 Chinese characters (cumulative.) A,E
    8.Locate important Chinese places on a Chinese map A,E
  
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    CHIN& 123 Chinese III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHNSE 103 - CCN; Elementary Chinese III

    Prerequisite CHIN& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructors permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a first-year sequential course designed to help the students acquire the ability to speak, read, and write Chinese.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Use skills learned in Chinese 101/102 with greater speed and accuracy. A,B,C,D,E
    2.Use vocabulary of 1500 words (cumulative), including vocabulary for occupations. A,B,C,D,E
    3.Make an appointment or similar arrangement on the phone. B,D
    4.Give a short prepared presentation in Chinese. B,D,E
    5.Describe the immediate physical environment of daily life (clothing, room etc). A,B,C,D,E
    6.Describe (in Chinese or English) salient public institutions in China. A,B,D,E
    7.Read and write 200 Chinese characters (cumulative). A,E
    8.Explain (in Chinese or English) 20 salient features or figures of Chinese history. A,E
  
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    FRCH& 121 French I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly FRNCH 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a sequential beginning course in spoken and written French language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Comprehend texts with highly predictable contexts.
    2. Comprehend meaning through recognition of key words and formulaic phrases that are highly contextualized.
    3. Use own culture to derive meaning from texts that are heard, read, or viewed.
    4. Present basic information on common topics by producing words, lists, notes, and formulaic language.
    5. Produce memorized language that is appropriate to the context.
    6. Express self in the present tense in conversations on common topics using a variety of words.
    7. Imitate modeled words and ask for repetition and clarification.
  
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    FRCH& 122 French II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly FRNCH 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite FRCH& 121 with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 1 year high school French plus placement in ENGL& 101; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of FRCH& 121 stressing speaking, reading, writing and understanding the French language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Comprehend information related to basic personal and social needs and relevant to one’s immediate environment such as self and everyday life, school, community, and particular interests.
    2. Comprehend simple stories, routine correspondence, short descriptive texts or other selections within common contexts.
    3. Understand straightforward language that contains mostly familiar structures.
    4. Express own thoughts and present information and personal preferences on common topics by creating with language in simple present and past tense verb forms.
    5. Produce sentences, series of sentences, and some connected sentences.
    6. Use some culturally appropriate vocabulary, expressions and gestures.
    7. Use a variety of strategies to maintain communication including asking questions, seeking clarification and self-correcting.
  
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    FRCH& 123 French III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly FRNCH 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite FRCH& 122 with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 2 years high school French; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of FRCH& 122 stressing speaking, reading, writing and understanding the French language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Make inferences and derive meaning from context and linguistic features.
    2. Comprehend paragraph discourse such as that found in written reports, newspapers and literary works.
    3. Classify words or concepts according to word order and grammatical use.
    4. Produce narrations and descriptions in major time frames.
    5. Communicate information and express self with detail and organization on familiar and some new concrete topics using paragraphs.
    6. Share basic opinions in writing assignments and classroom discussions.
    7. Ask questions to probe beyond basic details.
    8. Use cultural knowledge appropriate to the presentational context and increasingly reflective or authentic cultural practices and perspectives.
  
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    GERM& 121 German I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GERMN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first year sequential course to give the student the ability to speak, read, write and understand the German language and culture.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Comprehend speech samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    2.Comprehend written language samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    3.Construct correct basic sentences and paragraphs
    4.Employ Nominative and Accusative case articles and modifiers in phrases, sentences, expressions and idioms
    5.Request and provide information pertaining to course content orally
    6.Request and provide information pertaining to course content in writing
    7.Distinguish and demonstrate appropriate forms of address
    8.Comprehend and apply case, gender, verb tense, person and number appropriately within the scope of the content of this course as indicated in other outcomes
  
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    GERM& 122 German II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GERMN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite GERM& 121  with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 1 year high school German plus placement in ENGL& 101 ; or instructor permission

    Course Description
    Continuation of GERM& 121 stressing speaking, reading, writing and understanding German.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Express permission, desires, preferences, abilities, necessities and obligations
    2.Give simple commands using the imperative mood forms
    3.Use verb prefixes and verb compounds in correct sentence structures
    4.Deduce meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases using a variety of strategies
    5.Comprehend and use sufficient thematic vocabulary to negotiate simple tasks and basic communication
    6.Recognize cultural differences in meals, eating habits and etiquette
    7.Construct correct sentences using dependant and independent clauses
    8.Read simple authentic, level-adapted texts and comprehend their meaning
    9.Write short paragraphs in German
    10.Participate in content related conversation
    11.Comprehend comparative structures
    12.Comprehend and apply appropriate past tenses of verbs in reading, writing, speaking and listening
    13.Distinguish the appropriate verbs “to know” in German
  
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    GERM& 123 German III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly GERMN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite GERM& 122  with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 2 years high school German plus placement in ENGL& 101 ; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of GERM& 122 stressing speaking, reading and writing

    Student Outcomes
    1.Recognize and apply the dative case in appropriate sentence structures in writing and in speech
    2.Discuss gift purchasing and giving traditions for birthdays, holidays and other social occasions
    3.Employ Genitive and Dative case articles and modifiers in phrases, sentences, expressions and idioms
    4.comprehend and apply possession in appropriate sentence structures in writing and speech
    5.Discuss and describe a variety of living environments and public spaces
    6.recognize correct case after prepositions (dative and accusative)
    7.Discuss cultural habits and use newly learned vocabulary associated with shopping
    8.Discuss meals in restaurants using proper etiquette
    9.Discuss personal grooming using pronominal verbs in reflexive and reciprocal usage
    10.Recognize and employ the simple past tense in narration, descriptions and expressing opinions in speech and in writing
  
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    JAPN& 121 Japanese I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. pronounce Japanese syllables, words, phrases, and simple sentences. B,D
    2. read and write all Hiragana characters accurately in words and short sentences. A, C, E
    3. use a basic vocabulary related to course themes with functional pronunciation. A, B, C, D, E
    4. use basic Japanese sentence structure. A, B, D, E
    5. introduce self and others, greet others with appropriate level of politeness, exchange simple personal information. A, B, D, E
    6. exchange simple statements and questions about daily activities. A, B, D, E
    7. make and respond to simple suggestions and proposals. A, B, D, E
    8. exchange information concerning money, time, and dates. A, B, D, E
    9. explain and discuss Japanese holidays and festivals (in English). A, E
    10. recognize and implement Japanese non-verbal/non-written communication. B, D
  
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    JAPN& 122 Japanese II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite JAPN& 121  with at least a 1.5 grade, or one year of high school Japanese, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The second quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student with the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. use the skills learned in Japanese 101 with greater speed and accuracy. A, B, C, D, E
    2. demonstrate improved listening and pronunciation. A, B, C, D, E
    3. read and write all Katakana and 75 Kanji characters. A, C, E
    4. read and write new words and complex sentences using Hiragana, Katakana, and some Kanji. A, C, E
    5. understand and use standard sentence structure, including simple subordinate clauses of time, place, consession, and condition.
    6. discuss food, travel, and study. A, B, D, E
    7. give location and directions to stores, schools, buildings, and city features A, B, D,E
    8. express likes, dislikes, and preferences A, B,D,E
    9. locate important sites and feature on a map of Japan
  
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    JAPN& 123 Japanese III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite JAPN& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade, or two years of high school Japanese, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. use skills learned in Japanese 101/102 with greater speed and accuracy. A, B, C, D, E
    2. give a short, prepared presentation in Japanese. B, D, E
    3. describe immediate physical environment (clothing, furniture, and daily consumables). A, B, C, D, E
    4. discuss professions and work. A, B,C, D, E
    5. use different levels of politeness in conversation. B, C, D, E
    6. write a short formal letter in Japanese. A, E
    7. use “Indirect Speech Mannerism” in a conversation B,C, D, E
    8. read and write 200 Kanji (cumulative). A, C, E
    9. compare and contrast social behavior found in Japanese culture with own culture (in English). A, B, C, D, E
  
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    KREA& 121 Korean I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first-year sequential course designed to provide to students the ability to speak, read, write, and understand the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to greet others and introduce oneself using given names.
    2. Identify the difference between Sino-Korean and native Korean numbers, and use them properly in sentences.
    3. Recognize and verbally articulate Korean terms for body parts and illnesses.
    4. Recognize and articulate basic oral Korean commands, such as sit, stand, greet and shake hands.
    5. Tell time orally, associating time with appropriate activities.
    6. Recognize and articulate Korean terms for articles of clothing and associated colors.
    7. Conjugate Korean verbs.
    8. Use at least five Korean terms to provide oral directions to a specified location.
    9. Describe traditional practices associated with Korean New Year, such as wearing traditional attire (Hanbok), visiting elders, bowing to demonstrate respect.
  
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    KREA& 122 Korean II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite KREA& 121  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A continuation of KREA& 121, with a focus on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate mastery of Korean 121 course content with increased levels of speed and accuracy.
    2. Identify when to use Sino-Korean and when to use native Korean numbers when talking about age, weight, height, social security number, driver license number and telephone number.
    3. Question classmates to determine their daily schedules.
    4. Use “don’t” and “can’t” to discuss individual interests and skills.
    5. Describe community activities as depicted in pictures.
    6. Respond to questions regarding daily activities, such as taking a taxi, buying clothes and telling time.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to use informal verb forms when speaking to friends and peers, while using formal verb forms when speaking to seniors, parents and superiors.
    8. Use Korean vocabulary to describe cashing a check, counting money.
    9. Use at least five Korean direction words to provide directions to a specified location.
    10. Describe the Korean use of lunar and solar calendars, and how this results in two Korean birthdays.
  
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    KREA& 123 Korean III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite KREA& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of KREA& 122, with a focus on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate mastery of Korean 122 course content with increased levels of speed and accuracy.
    2. Use a sketch map to give directions and find a place.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to determine a classmate’s hobbies and favorite sport through direct questioning.
    4. Ask questions about shopping using honorific forms, and convert from the honorific to the plain form.
    5. Make a reservation and order food in a restaurant using correct Korean grammar.
    6. Use previously learned vocabulary and sentence structures to describe taking a short trip.
    7. Ask for and demonstrate understanding of directions to a specific location or landmark within a city.
    8. Use Korean vocabulary to buy stamps, cards and envelopes at a post office, and to make inquiries about the cost of postage.
    9. Identify Korea’s major holidays and compare them to America’s major holidays.
  
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    RUSS& 121 Russian I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly RUSSN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first year sequential course to give the student the ability to speak, read, write and understand the Russian language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Understand speech samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    2. Understand written language samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    3. Construct correct basic sentences and paragraphs
    4. Employ nominative and prepositional nouns and adjectives in phrases, sentences, expressions and idioms
    5. Request and provide information on pertaining to course content orally
    6. Request and provide information pertaining to course content in writing
    7. Distinguish and demonstrate appropriate forms of address
    8. Understand and apply case, gender, verb tense, person and number appropriately within the scope of the content of this course as indicated in other outcomes
  
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    RUSS& 122 Russian II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly RUSSN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite RUSS& 121   with at least a 1.5 grade, or 1 year high school Russian, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of RUSS& 121  stressing speaking, reading, writing and understanding.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Understand speech samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    2. Understand written language samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    3. Construct correct basic sentences and paragraphs
    4. Employ nominative, prepositional, accusative, and genitive case in phrases, sentences, expressions and idioms
    5. Request and provide information on pertaining to course content orally
    6. Request and provide information pertaining to course content in writing
    7. Understand and apply case, gender, verb tense, person and number appropriately within the scope of the content of this course as indicated in other outcomes
  
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    RUSS& 123 Russian III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly RUSSN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite RUSS& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade, or 2 years high school Russian, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a first year sequential course to give the student the ability to speak, read, write and understand the Russian language and culture.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Understand speech samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    2. Understand written language samples and respond using course vocabulary and structures
    3. Construct correct basic sentences and paragraphs
    4. Employ nominative, prepositional, accusative, genitive, dative, and instrumental cases in phrases, sentences, expressions and idioms
    5. Request and provide information pertaining to course content orally
    6. Request and provide information pertaining to course content in writing
    7. Understand and apply case, gender, verb conjugation and voice, person and number appropriately within the scope of the content of this course as indicated in other outcomes
  
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    SPAN& 121 Spanish I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPAN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    A first-year sequential course to give the student the ability to speak, read, write and understand Spanish.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Comprehend speech samples providing information pertaining to course content
    2. Comprehend written language samples providing information pertaining to course content.
    3. Construct basic sentences and paragraphs appropriately.
    4. Vary basic information appropriately with modifiers (adjectival and adverbial).
    5. Request and provide information pertaining to course content in writing.
    6. Request and provide information pertaining to course content orally.
    7. Distinguish and demonstrate appropriate forms of address.
    8. Apply and comprehend case, person, number, gender, and tense appropriately within the scope of the content of this course as indicated in other outcomes.
  
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    SPAN& 122 Spanish II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPAN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite SPAN& 121   grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Second quarter of first-year Spanish stressing speaking, reading, writing and understanding Spanish.

    Student Outcomes
    1. show subject-verb relationship in a written and oral Spanish
    2. distinguish between verb tenses in passive and active mode
    3. deduce meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases using a variety of strategies
    5. draw upon a vocabulary of 600 words minimum.
    6. discuss meals and order food in a restaurant
    7. identify the cultural differences and connections of regional foods
    8. form questions using different verb tenses
    9. read simple, authentic, or level adapted texts and comprehend their meaning
    10. write a short narration in Spanish
    11. participate in classroom conversation
    12. make comparisons of equality and inequality.
  
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    SPAN& 123 Spanish III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPAN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite SPAN& 122   grade of 2.0 or better, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A continuation of first-year Spanish stressing speaking, writing, reading and understanding Spanish.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Differentiate between the perfect and imperfect verbal aspects in the past.
    2. Give simple commands in the appropriate mode of address.
    3. Discuss maintaining one’s health and well being.
    4. Describe a variety of living environments and public spaces.
    5. Discuss the future.
    6. Use the subjunctive mood to indicate a point in the future and to give advice.
    7. Narrate a story.
    8. State and support an opinion.
  
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    SPAN& 221 Spanish IV (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPAN 201 - CCN

    Prerequisite SPAN& 123  with at least a 1.5 grade, or 3 years high school Spanish, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Provides vocabulary building, grammar development, and practice in oral and written communication through the study of various aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. Specific cultural topics will vary at instructor’s discretion.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Participate in classroom business, such as discussing assignment instructions, scheduling activities, and asking for clarification of class topics using Spanish language.
    2.Discuss topics such as literature, history, current events and popular culture with increased sophistication in terms of Spanish vocabulary, syntax, and cultural understanding.
    3.Write substantively and creatively, using more sophisticated Spanish grammar and syntax.
    4.Create and deliver an oral presentation with increased Spanish fluency and more sophisticated Spanish vocabulary and syntax.
    5.Describe, persuade, and narrate using more sophisticated Spanish vocabulary and syntax.
    6.Interact effectively with others to complete a task or achieve a goal, such as producing a skit, creating a brochure, or planning an outing using Spanish Language.
    7.Identify and explain significant figures, events, and accomplishments of the Spanish-speaking world.
    8.Read for comprehension short works of Spanish literature and in-depth articles.
 

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