2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Oct 07, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Prefixes


COURSE PREFIXES

PREFIX DEPARTMENT
ACCT ACCOUNTING
ASL AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
ANTH ANTHROPOLOGY
ART ART
ASTR ASTRONOMY
ATMOS ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
BIOL BIOLOGY
BUS BUSINESS
BTECA/BTECM BUSINESS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
MNGT BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
CHEM CHEMISTRY
COLLG COLLEGE SUCCESS
CMST COMMUNICATION STUDIES
CIS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CNE COMPUTER NETWORK ENGINEERING
CONST CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
CJ CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CS COMPUTER SCIENCE
DHYG DENTAL HYGIENE
DDSGN DIGITAL DESIGN
DRMA DRAMA
ECED EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECON ECONOMICS
EDUC EDUCATION
EMT EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
ENGR ENGINEERING
ENGL ENGLISH
ENVS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
FASH FASHION MERCHANDISING
FCA FIRE COMMAND
FRCH FRENCH
GEOG GEOGRAPHY
GEOL GEOLOGY
GERM GERMAN
HIST HISTORY
HSEM HOMELAND SECURITY
HSCI HEALTH SCIENCES
HSSA HUMAN SERVICES SUBSTANCE ABUSE
HUM HUMANITIES
INFO INFORMATION STUDIES
INTS INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
ISS INTEGRATED SOCIAL SCIENCE
JAPN JAPANESE
JOURN JOURNALISM
KINS KINESIOLOGY
KREA KOREAN
MATH MATHEMATICS
MUSC MUSIC
NSCI NATURAL SCIENCE
NURS NURSING
NAC NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFIED
NUTR NUTRITION
OSH OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
OCEA OCEANOGRAPHY
PHIL PHILOSOPHY
PE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PS PHYSICAL SCIENCE
PHYS PHYSICS
POLS POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSYC PSYCHOLOGY
READ READING
RUSS RUSSIAN
SSMH SOCIAL SERVICE MENTAL HEALTH
SOC SOCIOLOGY
SPAN SPANISH
VT VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

 

 
  
  •  

    ABE 010 Beginning ABE Literacy Reading 1 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn phonics and language patterns, interpreting signs, symbols and labels, and alphabetizing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R1.1 Decode and recognize everyday words and word groups in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules (decoding letter-sound correspondence, isolating and saying first and last sounds, recognizing simple rhyming word patterns), using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R1.2 Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels, digraphs and blends), and simple, everyday content knowledge and common vocabulary in simple sentences.
    R1.3 Locate important items of information in texts.
    R1.4 Monitor accuracy of decoding and word recognition and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text; making a list of new words, or using a picture dictionary.
    R1.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    2. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 011 Beginning ABE Literacy Writing 1 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure and paragraph structure.

    Student Outcomes
    1.
    W1.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W1.2 Follow a highly structured, externally developed plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs in very simple structures such as lists or responses to prompts for everyday information.
    W1.3 Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses), numbers (dates, phone #s, addresses, prices, etc) and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience. Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary to produce several sentences on a familiar topic.
    W1.4 Make a few simple content changes based on review and feedback from others.
    W1.5 Make a few simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization

    2. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 012 Beginning ABE Literacy - Math 1 (1 to 6 credits



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn identification, ordering, adding, and subtracting of whole numbers.

    Student Outcomes
    1.
    M1.1 Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (2s, 5s, 10s); mathematical relationships – more, less, larger, smaller, left, right, heavier, longer.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, months, weeks, days, minutes, hours), and concepts of geometric shape, length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (checksheets, picture graphs,) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.
    M1.2 Recall and use a few simple mathematical procedures such as very basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), orally counting by 2s, 5s and 10s, addition and subtraction and beginning multiplication.
    M1.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M1.4 Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, describe patterns, and/or use basic computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M1.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.
    2. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 013 Beginning ABE Literacy - Reading/Writing 1 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W1.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W1.2 Follow a highly structured, externally developed plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs in very simple structures such as lists or responses to prompts for everyday information.
    W1.3 Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses), numbers (dates, phone numbers, addresses, prices, etc) and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience. Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary to produce several sentences on a familiar topic.
    W1.4 Make a few simple content changes based on review and feedback from others.
    W1.5 Make a few simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.
    2. Reading
    R1.1 Decode and recognize everyday words and word groups in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules (decoding letter-sound correspondence, isolating and saying firs and las sounds, recognizing simple rhyming words patterns), using picture ads, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R1.2 Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowles, digraphs and blends), and simple, everyday content knowledge and common vocabulary in simple sentences.
    R1.3 Locate important items of information in texts.
    R1.4 Monitor accuracy of decoding and word recognition and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text; making a list of new words, or using a picture dictionary.
    R1.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    3. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 014 Beginning ABE Literacy - Integrated 1 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W1.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W1.2 Follow a highly structured, externally developed plan (or text model) to organize information about self and/or related to immediate needs in very simple structures such as lists or responses to prompts for everyday information.
    W1.3 Write all letters of the alphabet and numbers and appropriately use simple, everyday, highly familiar words (personal names, signatures, addresses), numbers (dates, phone #s, addresses, prices, etc) and simple phrases to convey information with minimal attention to audience. Appropriately use everyday, familiar vocabulary to produce several sentences on a familiar topic.
    W1.4 Make a few simple content changes based on review and feedback from others.
    W1.5 Make a few simple edits of handwriting, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

    2. Reading
    R1.1 Decode and recognize everyday words and word groups in short, simple texts by breaking words into parts, tapping out/sounding out syllables, applying pronunciation rules (decoding letter-sound correspondence, isolating and saying first and last sounds, recognizing simple rhyming word patterns), using picture aids, and recalling oral vocabulary and sight words.
    R1.2 Demonstrate familiarity with concepts of print, letter shapes, letter names and sounds (individual consonants and vowels, digraphs and blends), and simple, everyday content knowledge and common vocabulary in simple sentences.
    R1.3 Locate important items of information in texts.
    R1.4 Monitor accuracy of decoding and word recognition and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, copying and rephrasing text; making a list of new words, or using a picture dictionary.
    R1.5 Recall prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    3. Mathematics
    M1.1 Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (2s, 5s, 10s); mathematical relationships – more, less, larger, smaller, left, right, heavier, longer.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, months, weeks, days, minutes, hours), and concepts of geometric shape, length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (checksheets, picture graphs,) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.
    M1.2 Recall and use a few simple mathematical procedures such as very basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), orally counting by 2s, 5s and 10s, addition and subtraction and beginning multiplication.
    M1.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M1.4 Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, describe patterns, and/or use basic computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M1.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.
    4. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 020 ABE Beginning Basic Education - Reading 2 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn phonics and language patterns, identifying a paragraph’s main ideas, cause and effect relationships, alphabetizing, reading and interpreting signs, symbols and abbreviations, and following instructions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R2.1 Decode and recognize everyday and some unfamiliar words in short text by drawing on content knowledge, oral vocabulary and sight words, breaking words into parts for the purpose of aiding decoding and comprehension, applying pronunciation rules, and adjusting reading pace.
    R2.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R2.3 Locate important items of information in simplified text using some simple strategies.
    R2.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, recalling, copying and rephrasing text; or using a simplified dictionary.
    R2.5 Apply prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    2. Goal Setting
    G2.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 021 ABE Beginning Basic Education - Writing (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W2.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W2.2 Follow a highly structured plan to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W2.3 Appropriately use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a single paragraph to convey an idea with supporting details and examples.
    W2.4 Demonstrate beginning attention to revision strategies including rereading and revising based on review and feedback from others.
    W2.5 Make basic edits of grammar (verb tenses, subject/verb agreement), simple and compound sentences, capitalization, spelling and punctuation (end periods, some commas).
    2. Goal Setting
    G2.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 022 ABE Beginning Basic Education - Math 2 (1 to 6 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn whole numbers, rounding, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, estimating, and real life math problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Mathematics
    M2.1 Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4) and percents (50%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (5s, 10s, 25s), and very simple proportions (2:1, 1:2).
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, quarts, gallons), geometric shapes, and concepts of length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (checksheets, picture graphs, unambiguous bar graphs, line plots) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.
    M2.2 Begin to evaluate reasonableness of solutions. Add and subtract whole numbers through three digits, and multiply and divide three digit numbers by one digit numbers. Recall and use mathematical procedures such as basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), and measuring length and weight using tools calibrated with whole numbers (rulers, manipulatives).
    M2.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M2.4 Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M2.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.
    2. Goal Setting
    G2.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 023 ABE Beginning Basic Education - Reading/Writing 2 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W2.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W2.2 Follow a highly structured plan to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W2.3 Appropriately use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a single paragraph to convey an idea with supporting details and examples.
    W2.4 Demonstrate beginning attention to revision strategies including rereading and revising based on review and feedback from others.
    W2.5 Make basic edits of grammar (verb tenses, subject/verb agreement), simple and compound sentences, capitalization, spelling and punctuation (end periods, some commas).
    2. Reading
    R2.1 Decode and recognize everyday and some unfamiliar words in short text by drawing on content knowledge, oral vocabulary and sigh words, breaking words into parts for the purpose of aiding decoding and comprehension, applying pronunciation rules, and adjusting reading pace.
    R2.2 demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R2.3 Locate important items of information in simplified text using some simple strategies.
    R2.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading , restating, recalling, copying and rephrasing text; or using a simplified dictionary.
    R2.5 Apply prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    3. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 024 ABE Beginning Basic Education - Integrated 2 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review beginning grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W2.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W2.2 Follow a highly structured plan to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W2.3 Appropriately use familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a single paragraph to convey an idea with supporting details and examples.
    W2.4 Demonstrate beginning attention to revision strategies including rereading and revising based on review and feedback from others.
    W2.5 Make basic edits of grammar (verb tenses, subject/verb agreement), simple and compound sentences, capitalization, spelling and punctuation (end periods, some commas).
    2. Reading
    R2.1 Decode and recognize everyday and some unfamiliar words in short text by drawing on content knowledge, oral vocabulary and sight words, breaking words into parts for the purpose of aiding decoding and comprehension, applying pronunciation rules, and adjusting reading pace.
    R2.2 Demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R2.3 Locate important items of information in simplified text using some simple strategies.
    R2.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using various strategies, such as rereading, restating, recalling, copying and rephrasing text; or using a simplified dictionary.
    R2.5 Apply prior knowledge to assist in selecting texts and in understanding the information they contain.
    3. Mathematics
    M2.1 Read, write, and interpret very simple types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers (three digit numbers), common monetary values, and benchmark fractions (1/2, 1/4) and percents (50%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: very simple patterns, commonly-used denominations/groupings (5s, 10s, 25s), and very simple proportions (2:1, 1:2).
    Space/Shape/Measurement: high frequency standard units of measurement (pounds, feet, quarts, gallons), geometric shapes, and concepts of length and width.
    Data/Statistics: very simple ways to interpret and represent data (checksheets, picture graphs, unambiguous bar graphs, line plots) emphasizing frequency of occurrence.
    M2.2 Begin to evaluate reasonableness of solutions. Add and subtract whole numbers through three digits, and multiply and divide three digit numbers by one digit numbers. Recall and use mathematical procedures such as basic estimating, counting, sorting, ordering, grouping, adding on (using counting or a calculator), and measuring length and weight using tools calibrated with whole numbers (rulers, manipulatives).
    M2.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M2.4 Extract discrete information from simple and concrete data and graphs, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M2.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in role plays, with pictures, or by entries on a simple chart.
    4. Goal Setting
    G2.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 030 ABE Low Intermediate Basic Education - Reading 3 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn vocabulary, comprehension, and the development of reading skills for personal pleasure and for workforce literacy.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R3.1 Decode and recognize most everyday and some unfamiliar and specialized words and abbreviations in short to medium-length text by drawing on content knowledge and oral vocabulary, breaking words into parts, applying pronunciation rules, and adjusting reading pace.
    R3.2 Demonstrate familiarity with common, high-interest content knowledge and related vocabulary.
    R3.3 Locate important information in short to medium-length text using some simple strategies.
    R3.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a range of simple strategies, such as posing and answering questions, recalling, restating, rephrasing, explaining the content of the text or using simple examples.
    R3.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    2. Goal Setting
    G3.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 031 ABE Low Intermediate Basic Education - Writing 3 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review intermediate grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph development.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W3.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W3.2 Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (to convey personal experience, meet a specific need, or respond to recent learning), and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W3.3 Appropriately use mostly familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a paragraph to convey ideas with several supporting details/examples reflecting some attention to audience.
    W3.4 Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness by re-reading and revising during the writing process and making revisions to a first and final draft based on review and feedback from others. Demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W3.5 Make several simple edits of grammar (such as simple tense agreement), spelling, and punctuation (such as periods, capital letters, and some commas), sentence structure (such as compound and some complex sentences), language usage, and text structure using tools such as spelling word lists and simple editing checklists.
    2. Goal Setting
    G3.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 032 ABE Low Intermediate Basic Education - Math 3 (1 to 6 credits



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn whole numbers, decimals, percents, fractions, and real-life and workplace application of these operations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Mathematics
    M3.1 Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers, monetary values and prices, benchmark fractions (3/4, 1/10), decimals (.25, .50, .75, .10) and percents (25%, 75%, 10%, 100%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: simple patterns, probability and proportions (1:4, 4:1); simple decimal/fraction conversions and equivalents.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: commonly used standard units of measurement, common geometric shapes, and the concept of “area”.
    Data/Statistics: simple ways to interpret and represent data (tables, bar graphs with and without gridlines, line graphs and pie graphs).
    M3.2 Recall and use mathematic procedures such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, benchmark decimals and fractions (with or without use of calculator), grouping, comparing 2 numbers, and basic estimating; and measure length, weight, and areas of standard and non-standard shapes using tools calibrated with whole numbers and benchmark fraction and decimal equivalents (rulers, manipulatives).
    M3.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M3.4 Define, select, and organize simple data, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M3.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in pictures, or in writing.
    2. Goal Setting
    G3.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 033 ABE Low Intermediate Basic Education-Reading/Writing 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review intermediate grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W3.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W3.2 Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (to convey personal experience, meet a specific need, or respond to recent learning), and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W3.3 Appropriately use mostly familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a paragraph to convey an ideas with several supporting details/examples reflecting some attention to audience.
    W3.4 Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness by re-reading and revising during the writing process and making revisions to a first and final draft based on review and feedback from others. Demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W3.5 Make several simple edits of grammar (such as simple tense agreement), spelling, and punctuation (such as periods, capital letters, and some commas), sentence structure (such as compound and come complex sentences), language usage, and text structure using tools such as spelling word lists and simple editing checklists.
    2. Reading
    R3.1 Decode and recognize most everyday and some unfamiliar and specialized words, and abbreviations in short to medium-length text by drawing on content knowledge and oral vocabulary.
    R3.2 demonstrate familiarity with simple, everyday content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R3.3 Locate important information in short to medium-length text using some simple strategies.
    R3.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a range of simple strategies, such as posing and answering questions, recalling, restating, rephrasing, explaining the content of the text of using simple examples.
    R3.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    3. Goal Setting
    G1.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 034 ABE Low Intermediate Basic Education - Integrated 3 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review intermediate grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W3.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W3.2 Use simple planning strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (to convey personal experience, meet a specific need, or respond to recent learning), and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W3.3 Appropriately use mostly familiar vocabulary (based on personal experience and learning) and basic text structure of simple steps/instructions/commands or a paragraph to convey ideas with several supporting details/examples reflecting some attention to audience.
    W3.4 Use simple revision strategies to monitor effectiveness by re-reading and revising during the writing process and making revisions to a first and final draft based on review and feedback from others. Demonstrate beginning attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice, and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W3.5 Make several simple edits of grammar (such as simple tense agreement), spelling, and punctuation (such as periods, capital letters, and some commas), sentence structure (such as compound and some complex sentences), language usage, and text structure using tools such as spelling word lists and simple editing checklists.
    2. Reading
    R3.1 Decode and recognize most everyday and some unfamiliar and specialized words and abbreviations in short to medium-length text by drawing on content knowledge and oral vocabulary, breaking words into parts, applying pronunciation rules, and adjusting reading pace.
    R3.2 Demonstrate familiarity with common, high-interest content knowledge and related vocabulary.
    R3.3 Locate important information in short to medium-length text using some simple strategies.
    R3.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a range of simple strategies, such as posing and answering questions, recalling, restating, rephrasing, explaining the content of the text or using simple examples.
    R3.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    3. Mathematics
    M3.1 Read, write, and interpret some common types of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: whole numbers, monetary values and prices, benchmark fractions (3/4, 1/10), decimals (.25, .50, .75, .10) and percents (25%, 75%, 10%, 100%).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: simple patterns, probability and proportions (1:4, 4:1); simple decimal/fraction conversions and equivalents.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: commonly used standard units of measurement, common geometric shapes, and the concept of “area”.
    Data/Statistics: simple ways to interpret and represent data (tables, bar graphs with and without gridlines, line graphs and pie graphs).
    M3.2 Recall and use mathematic procedures such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division on whole numbers, benchmark decimals and fractions (with or without use of calculator), grouping, comparing 2 numbers, and basic estimating; and measure length, weight, and areas of standard and non-standard shapes using tools calibrated with whole numbers and benchmark fraction and decimal equivalents (rulers, manipulatives).
    M3.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M3.4 Define, select, and organize simple data, and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use computational procedures effectively to solve a problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M3.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, in pictures, or in writing.
    4. Goal Setting
    G3.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 040 ABE High Intermediate Basic Education - Reading 4 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced vocabulary and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam .

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R4.1 Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words and abbreviations using word analysis or inference.
    R4.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R4.3 Locate important information, read for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R4.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace.
    R4.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.

    R4.6 Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization.
    2. Goal Setting
    G4.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 041 ABE High Intermediate Basic Education - Writing 4 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, and paragraph development in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam .

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W4.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W4.2 Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (such as writing to inform, to get things done, to express feelings and ideas or to persuade others) and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W4.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary and a limited variety of simple and complex sentence structures in multiple coherent steps or a few well-constructed and linked paragraphs to convey ideas, with several supporting facts/details/examples reflecting judgment regarding appropriate language and level of formality for the intended audience.
    W4.4 Use several simple revision strategies to monitor one’s own writing, make revisions based on review and feedback from others, and produce rough and final drafts. Demonstrate some attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W4.5 Make many edits of grammar (verb tense forms), spelling, sentence structure (simple/compound/complex with appropriate capitalization and punctuation), language usage and text structure, often with the help of tools such as simplified dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers.
    2. Goal Setting
    G4.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 042 ABE High Intermediate Basic Education - Math 4 (1 to 6 credits



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review fractions, decimals, percents, beginning algebra, measurement, and basic geometry math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Mathematics
    M4.1 Read, write, and interpret a variety of common mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: monetary values, extensions of benchmark fractions (1/8, 1/3, 1/5, etc), decimals, and percents (15%, 30%, etc.).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: patterns and simple formulas (such as d=rt, a=lw); Space/Shape/Measurement: standard units of measurement including fractional units and benchmark angle measurements (90 degrees, 360 degrees, etc), geometric shapes including shapes containing a combination of common shapes, concept of pi, and concept of converting between units of measurement.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret and represent data (tables and graphs with scaling, basic statistical concepts such as range, mode, mean, and median).
    M4.2 Recall and use a good store of mathematical procedures such as estimation, rounding, multiplication and division (with and without use of a calculator), adding and subtracting, multiplying and dividing common fractional amounts and decimals, measure length, weight, area and circumference using tools calibrated to varying degrees of precision and converting units of measurement as appropriate.
    M4.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M4.4 Define, select and organize a variety of common mathematical data and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use appropriate procedures effectively to solve a problem and verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M4.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, with visual representations, in writing, by entries in a table or appropriate graph, or with basic statistics (range, mode, mean, median).
    4. Goal Setting
    G4.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 043 ABE High Intermediate Basic Education - Reading/Writing 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W4.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W4.2 Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (such as writing to inform, to get things done, to express feelings and ideas or to persuade others and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W4.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary and a limited variety of simple and complex sentence structures in multiple coherent steps or a few well-constructed and liked paragraphs to convey ideas, with several supporting facts/details/examples reflecting judgment regarding appropriate language and level of formality for the intended audience.
    W4.4 Use several simple revision strategies to monitor one’s own writing, make revisions based on review and feedback from others, and produce rough and final drafts. Demonstrate some attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W4.5 Make many edits of grammar (verb tense forms), spelling, sentence structure (simple/compound/complex with appropriate capitalization and punctuation), language usage and text structure, often with the help of tools such as simplified dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers.
    2. Reading
    R4.1 Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words and abbreviations using word analysis or inference.
    R4.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R4.3 Locate important information, read for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R4.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace.
    R4.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    3. Goal Setting
    G4.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 044 ABE High Intermediate Basic Education - Integrated 4 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W4.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W4.2 Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose (such as writing to inform, to get things done, to express feelings and ideas or to persuade others) and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W4.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary and a limited variety of simple and complex sentence structures in multiple coherent steps or a few well-constructed and linked paragraphs to convey ideas, with several supporting facts/details/examples reflecting judgment regarding appropriate language and level of formality for the intended audience.
    W4.4 Use several simple revision strategies to monitor one’s own writing, make revisions based on review and feedback from others, and produce rough and final drafts. Demonstrate some attention to clarity, descriptiveness, personal voice and appropriateness of text for the intended audience.
    W4.5 Make many edits of grammar (verb tense forms), spelling, sentence structure (simple/compound/complex with appropriate capitalization and punctuation), language usage and text structure, often with the help of tools such as simplified dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers.
    2. Reading
    R4.1 Recognize unfamiliar and some specialized words and abbreviations using word analysis or inference.
    R4.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary.
    R4.3 Locate important information, read for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R4.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace.
    R4.5 Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in texts.
    R4.6 Organize information using some strategies, such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing and simple categorization.
    3. Mathematics
    M4.1 Read, write, and interpret a variety of common mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: monetary values, extensions of benchmark fractions (1/8, 1/3, 1/5, etc), decimals, and percents (15%, 30%, etc.).
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: patterns and simple formulas (such as d=rt, a=lw); Space/Shape/Measurement: standard units of measurement including fractional units and benchmark angle measurements (90 degrees, 360 degrees, etc), geometric shapes including shapes containing a combination of common shapes, concept of pi, and concept of converting between units of measurement.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret and represent data (tables and graphs with scaling, basic statistical concepts such as range, mode, mean, and median).
    M4.2 Recall and use a good store of mathematical procedures such as estimation, rounding, multiplication and division (with and without use of a calculator), adding and subtracting, multiplying and dividing common fractional amounts and decimals, measure length, weight, area and circumference using tools calibrated to varying degrees of precision and converting units of measurement as appropriate.
    M4.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M4.4 Define, select and organize a variety of common mathematical data and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use appropriate procedures effectively to solve a problem and verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M4.5 Communicate the solution to the problem orally, with visual representations, in writing, by entries in a table or appropriate graph, or with basic statistics (range, mode, mean, median).
    4. Goal Setting
    G4.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 050 ABE Low Adult Secondary Education - Reading 5 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced reading comprehension skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam or college entry exam.

    Student Outcomes
    R5.1 Recognize and interpret abbreviations and specialized vocabulary.
    R5.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with paragraph structure and document organization.
    R5.3 Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R5.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.
    R5.5 Evaluate prior knowledge against new information in texts to enhance understanding of the information.
    R5.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast.

    2. Goal Setting
    G5.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 051 ABE Low Adult Secondary Education - Writing 5 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    W5.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W5.2 Select from and use a good store of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W5.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms, and a variety of sentence structures, in medium-length, coherently-linked, and detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W5.4 Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions (such as for clarity, organization, and descriptiveness) and to solve a few more global problems posed by the writing text (such as changes in voice or tone to take into account the needs of the audience or re-sequencing of larger pieces of text based on feedback from others).
    W5.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and grammar guides.
    2. Goal Setting
    G5.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 052 ABE Low Adult Secondary Education - Math 5 (1 to 6 credits



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Mathematics
    M5.1 Read, write, and interpret a wide variety of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: money/expenses/prices, percentages, decimals and fractions.
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: patterns and formulas (such as a=pr2).
    Space/Shape/Measurement: units of measurement including fractional units, geometrical shapes including shapes containing a combination of common shapes, and concept of volume.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret, represent and draw implications from data (graphs, tables, and simple forms of statistical analysis).
    M5.2 Recall and use multi-step mathematical procedures (such as keeping accounts) that involve whole numbers as well as fractions, decimals, and/or percents, and measure volume using tools with different calibrations.
    M5.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M5.4 Define, select, organize, and integrate mathematical information of different types in carrying out procedures, describing patterns, and/or measuring with appropriate tools to solve the problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M5.5 Create appropriate visual or graphic representations such as charts, tables, graphs, etc. and clearly communicate the solution process and results orally or in writing to a variety of audiences.
    2. Goal Setting
    G5.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 053 ABE Low Adult Secondary Education - Reading/Writing (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W5.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W5.2 Select from and use a good store of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W5.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms, and a variety of sentence structures, in medium-length, coherently-linked, and detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audience.
    W5.4 Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions (such as for clarity, organization, and descriptiveness) and to solve a few more global problems posed by the writing text (such as changes in voice or tone to take into account the needs of the audience or re-sequencing of larger pieces of text based on feedback from others).
    W5.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and grammar guides.
    2. Reading
    R5.1 Recognize and interpret abbreviations and specialized vocabulary.
    R5.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with paragraph structure and document organization.
    R5.3 Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R5.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension by using a wide range of strategies
    R5.5 Evaluate prior knowledge against new information in texts to enhance understanding of the information.
    R5.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast.3. Goal Setting
    G5.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 054 ABE Low Adult Secondary Education - Integrated 5 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    W5.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W5.2 Select from and use a good store of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; outline, restate, summarize and categorize ideas and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W5.3 Appropriately use both everyday and specialized vocabulary including abstract nouns and idioms, and a variety of sentence structures, in medium-length, coherently-linked, and detailed text with appropriate tone, language, and level of formality and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W5.4 Use a variety of strategies to analyze and make simple revisions (such as for clarity, organization, and descriptiveness) and to solve a few more global problems posed by the writing text (such as changes in voice or tone to take into account the needs of the audience or re-sequencing of larger pieces of text based on feedback from others).
    W5.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to edit for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure and use appropriate tools such as dictionaries and grammar guides.
    2. Reading
    R5.1 Recognize and interpret abbreviations and specialized vocabulary.
    R5.2 Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with paragraph structure and document organization.
    R5.3 Locate important information, read identified sections for detail and determine missing information using a wide range of strategies.
    R5.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies.
    R5.5 Evaluate prior knowledge against new information in texts to enhance understanding of the information.
    R5.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a range of strategies such as classification, categorization, and comparison/contrast.
    3. Mathematics
    M5.1 Read, write, and interpret a wide variety of mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: money/expenses/prices, percentages, decimals and fractions.
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: patterns and formulas (such as a=pr2).
    Space/Shape/Measurement: units of measurement including fractional units, geometrical shapes including shapes containing a combination of common shapes, and concept of volume.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret, represent and draw implications from data (graphs, tables, and simple forms of statistical analysis).
    M5.2 Recall and use multi-step mathematical procedures (such as keeping accounts) that involve whole numbers as well as fractions, decimals, and/or percents, and measure volume using tools with different calibrations.
    M5.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution.
    M5.4 Define, select, organize, and integrate mathematical information of different types in carrying out procedures, describing patterns, and/or measuring with appropriate tools to solve the problem and to verify that the solution is reasonable.
    M5.5 Create appropriate visual or graphic representations such as charts, tables, graphs, etc. and clearly communicate the solution process and results orally or in writing to a variety of audiences.
    4. Goal Setting
    G5.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 060 ABE High Adult Secondary Education - Reading 6 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced reading comprehension skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Reading
    R6.1 Recognize and interpret terms, signs, symbols, acronyms, and abbreviations.
    R6.2 Demonstrate familiarity with extensive specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with the organization of long, complex prose and complex documents.
    R6.3 Locate both directly stated and implied important information, using a wide range of strategies to guide reading of long texts.
    R6.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as brainstorming and question formulation techniques.
    R6.5 Integrate prior knowledge with new information in texts to develop deep understanding of the information.
    R6.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a wide range of strategies, such as applying relevant information to multiple scenarios, summarizing, and drawing “big picture” conclusions and generalizations from detailed reading.
    2. Goal Setting
    G6.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 061 ABE High Adult Secondary Education - Writing 6 (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W6.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W6.2 Select from and use a wide range of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; reproduce, synthesize and draw sound conclusions from complex or extensive ideas; and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W6.3 Appropriately use extensive everyday and specialized vocabulary (including idiom, colloquialisms and cultural references as appropriate) and a variety of sentence structures (including those reflecting logical relations), in medium-length, well-sequenced, and detailed text with appropriate voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W6.4 Choose from a variety of strategies to make multiple simple and global revisions during the writing process. Effectively seek out, describe, and work through more global problems posed by the writing task (such as the need to re-sequence text for clarity, to add more details to make a logical argument or to change the tone or style to accommodate the audience).
    W6.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to make comprehensive edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure. Use appropriate editing tools as necessary.
    2. Goal Setting
    G6.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 062 ABE High Adult Secondary Education - Math 6 (1 to 6 credits



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Mathematics
    M6.1 Read, write, and interpret a wide variety of (often) complex mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: money/expenses/pricing.
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: formulas for a variety of calculations.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: architectural symbols/ models and scale modeling.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret, represent, identify trends in or draw inferences from data (complex tables and graphs; advanced forms of statistical analysis; graphing equations and generating equations from data and/or line graphs; using concept of slope).
    M6.2 Research, select and apply sophisticated, multi-step mathematical concepts and procedures (such as scale modeling, cost analysis, earnings/deductions analysis).
    M6.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution
    M6.4 Independently research, select, organize and integrate mathematical information of different types in carrying out procedures, describing patterns, and/or measuring with appropriate tools, to solve the problem and to verify that the solution in reasonable.
    M6.5 Create appropriate visual or graphic representations such as charts, tables, graphs, etc. and clearly communicate the solution process and results orally or in writing to a variety of audiences.
    2. Goal Setting
    G6.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 063 ABE High Adult Secondary Education - Reading/Writing 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development and reading comprehension in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W6.1 Determine the purpose and the audience for communicating in writing.
    W6.2 Select from and use a wide range of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; reproduce, synthesize and draw sound conclusions from complex or extensive ideas; and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W6.3 Appropriately use extensive everyday and specialized vocabulary (including idiom, colloquialisms and cultural references as appropriate) and a variety of sentence structures (including those reflecting logical relations), in medium-length, well-sequenced, and detailed text with appropriate voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W6.4 Choose from a variety of strategies to make multiple simple and global revisions during the writing process. Effectively seek out, describe, and work through more global problems posed by the writing task (such as the need to re-sequence text for clarity, to add more details to make a logical argument, or to change the tone or style to accommodate the audience).
    W6.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to make comprehensive edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure. Use appropri9ate editing tools as necessary.
    2. Reading
    R6.1 Recognize and interpret terms, signs, symbols, acronyms, and abbreviations.
    R6.2 Demonstrate familiarity with extensive specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with the organization of long, complex prose and complex documents.
    R6.3 Locate both directly stated and implied important information, using a wide range of strategies to guide reading of long texts.
    R6.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as brainstorming and question formulation techniques.
    R6.5 Integrate prior knowledge with new information in texts to develop deep understanding of the information
    R6.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a wide range of strategies, such as applying relevant information to multiple scenarios, summarizing, and drawing “big picture” conclusions and generalizations from detailed reading.
    3. Goal Setting
    G6.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
  •  

    ABE 064 ABE High Adult Secondary Education - Integrated 6 (1 to 15 credits)



    Course Description
    Designed for students to learn and/or review advanced grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure, paragraph development, reading comprehension and math skills in preparation for passing of the GED exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Writing
    W6.1 Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing.
    W6.2 Select from and use a wide range of tools and strategies for overall planning and organization; reproduce, synthesize and draw sound conclusions from complex or extensive ideas; and produce a legible and comprehensible draft.
    W6.3 Appropriately use extensive everyday and specialized vocabulary (including idiom, colloquialisms and cultural references as appropriate) and a variety of sentence structures (including those reflecting logical relations), in medium-length, well-sequenced, and detailed text with appropriate voice, tone, rhetorical forms, and style and in modes of organization suitable for a variety of audiences.
    W6.4 Choose from a variety of strategies to make multiple simple and global revisions during the writing process. Effectively seek out, describe, and work through more global problems posed by the writing task (such as the need to re-sequence text for clarity, to add more details to make a logical argument, or to change the tone or style to accommodate the audience).
    W6.5 Undertake multiple re-readings of text in order to make comprehensive edits for grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure. Use appropriate editing tools as necessary.


    2. Reading
    R6.1 Recognize and interpret terms, signs, symbols, acronyms, and abbreviations.
    R6.2 Demonstrate familiarity with extensive specialized content knowledge and vocabulary and with the organization of long, complex prose and complex documents.
    R6.3 Locate both directly stated and implied important information, using a wide range of strategies to guide reading of long texts.
    R6.4 Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as brainstorming and question formulation techniques.
    R6.5 Integrate prior knowledge with new information in texts to develop deep understanding of the information.
    R6.6 Organize and analyze information and reflect upon its meaning using a wide range of strategies, such as applying relevant information to multiple scenarios, summarizing, and drawing “big picture” conclusions and generalizations from detailed reading.
    3. Mathematics
    M6.1 Read, write, and interpret a wide variety of (often) complex mathematical information such as
    Numbers and number sense: money/expenses/pricing.
    Patterns/Functions/Relationships: formulas for a variety of calculations.
    Space/Shape/Measurement: architectural symbols/ models and scale modeling.
    Data/Statistics: ways to interpret, represent, identify trends in or draw inferences from data (complex tables and graphs; advanced forms of statistical analysis; graphing equations and generating equations from data and/or line graphs; using concept of slope).
    M6.2 Research, select and apply sophisticated, multi-step mathematical concepts and procedures (such as scale modeling, cost analysis, earnings/deductions analysis).
    M6.3 Evaluate the degree of precision needed for the solution
    M6.4 Independently research, select, organize and integrate mathematical information of different types in carrying out procedures, describing patterns, and/or measuring with appropriate tools, to solve the problem and to verify that the solution in reasonable.
    M6.5 Create appropriate visual or graphic representations such as charts, tables, graphs, etc. and clearly communicate the solution process and results orally or in writing to a variety of audiences.
    4. Goal Setting
    G6.1 Monitor progress on educational goals as they relate to their roles as students, workers, citizens, and family members.
  
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    ABE 090 ABE Foundations for Success (1 to 2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is designed to enhance pre-college student success. It emphasizes self-management, barrier removal, effective study skills and goal setting. Student outcomes were developed using the Four Components of the Community College Student Role, identified in the Guide to Transitions in Curriculum and approved by the Council for Basic Skills in October, 2013.

    Student Outcomes
    STUDENT OUTCOMES:
    Component 1 – Academic Habits
    A. Students will assess their preferred learning style, identify effective
    study strategies and choose strategies to implement immediate academic
    success.
    B. Students will employ the Cornell Note-Taking method during lectures and
    determine usefulness of method in other classes.
    C. Students will create flash cards and discuss effectiveness of using flash
    cards in studying.
    D. Students will understand the importance of review in studying and preparing
    for exams.
    E. Students will distinguish successful test preparation strategies that occur
    before, during and after a test.
    F. Students will demonstrate process of elimination strategy during a multiple
    choice test, and number/answer estimation during a math test.
    G. Students will examine test anxiety and strategize ways to prepare
    cognitively, physically and logistically in order to minimize anxiety.

    Component 2 – Exhibiting Cultural Know-How

    A. Students will examine their internal physiological response to stress and
    practice communication skills for engaging in meaningful conversation.

    Component 3 – Balancing Multiple Roles and Time Demands

    A. Students will examine Pierce College’s mission, vision and values and
    identify strong personal values.
    B. Students will articulate a goal that is specific, measurable, attainable,
    relevant and time-bound.
    C. Students will evaluate their use of time, what their needs are and how their
    needs are being met.
    D. Students will identify ways to prioritize time and energy to pursue goals.
    E. Students will examine and describe personal strengths to increase confidence
    and motivation.
    F. Students will understand the effect of behaviors and thoughts on the brain
    and the development of unconscious habits.
    G. Students will identify negative self-talk and implement positive self-talk
    to improve attitude, self-image and performance.

    Component 4 – Help-Seeking Behavior

    A. Students will identify unmet needs and seek assistance using college and
    community resources.
    B. Students will demonstrate problem solving skills to address barriers to
    success.

    Sub-outcomes for all writing activities:

    A. Students will determine purpose and use prior knowledge when generating
    ideas for writing activities.
    B. Students will convey ideas in writing using proper syntax, grammar, and
    sentence structure.
  
  •  

    ABE 095 Workplace Fundamentals (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A motivational and supportive employability training course focused on the development of educational training, and/or work plans for achieving long-term employment goals. Focus on development of attitude and self-management skills appropriate to educational settings and the work place.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Evaluate work interests, values, skills and aptitudes related to a vocational choice. (A,B,C)
    2. Analyze life experiences in order to identify skills transferable to the workplace. (A,C,E,F)
    3. Research general and local career opportunities. (A,B,E)
    4. Identify barriers to success and strategies for successful completion of goals. (A,B,C,E)
    5. Develop an action plan for short- and long-term employment goals. (A,B,C,E)
    6. Use job search strategies by preparing a draft application, resume, and cover letter. (A,E,F)
    7. Identify behavior guidelines for the interview process and participate in a mock interview. (A,D,E,G)
    8. Model appropriate work behaviors and practices. (A,C,D,G)
    9. List effective communication techniques in workplace and educational settings. (C,D,E)
    10. Apply self-care and life skills to personal growth and development. (A,C,G)
  
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    ABE 098 Transitions to College (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to assist Basic Skills students in preparing to transition to college programs. Students develop a personal plan, complete the initial steps toward college entrance, and develop skills for success.

  
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    ABE 099 I-BEST Academic Support ABE (1 to 20 credits)



    Course Description
    A low intermediate-level ABE course for second language students who are currently working or preparing to work in a specific job area and are enrolled in an I-BEST program. The course integrates reading, writing, listening, speaking, and math skills with the linguistic requirements of the job. The content of this course varies each time it is offered. It may include English language skills for specific content areas such as certification for childcare workers, English language skills for health services, etc.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Read with understanding in order to perform competently in a chosen career pathway.
    a) Recognize unfamiliar and specialized words, acronyms, and abbreviations related to a chosen career pathway.
    b) Demonstrate familiarity with everyday and some specialized content knowledge and career specific vocabulary in order to comprehend authentic career pathway materials.
    c) Locate important information in career-specific texts using a wide range of strategies.
    d) Monitor and enhance comprehension using a wide range of strategies, such as posing and answering questions, trial and error, and adjusting reading pace in order to comprehend behaviorally career specific reports, evaluations, and rules and safety procedures.
    e) Use strategies such as recall, restatement, simple sequencing, simple categorization, and conversion into charts, lists, and notes in order to organize career specific text information.
    f) Actively apply prior knowledge to assist in understanding information in corrections and protection officer related documents and procedures.

    2. Convey ideas in writing in order to perform competently in a chosen career pathway.
    a) Determine the purpose and audience for communicating in writing in order to perform the required job duties.
    b) Use multiple planning and pre-writing strategies to identify and organize a limited number of ideas to support a single purpose and produce legible, grammatically correct, and comprehensible job career documents.
    c) Appropriately use both everyday and specialized job specific vocabulary and well-constructed and linked paragraphs to accomplish career specific written communication documents.
    d) Use several simple revision strategies to monitor writing, to make revisions based on review and feedback from others, and to produce required career specific documents.
    e) Make edits of grammar, spelling, sentence structure, language usage, and text structure with the help of tools such as vocabulary lists, dictionaries, grammar checklists, and graphic organizers to produce accurate records and reports.

    3. Speak so others can understand in order to perform competently in an identified career pathway.
    a. Recall and use sufficient career specific vocabulary, grammar, sentence types, and registers in order to communicate effectively in the workplace.
    b. Select from a range of strategies (such as elaborating with some detail and examples; determining most important/right amount of information and content to convey) to select, organize, and relay key information related to a chosen career.
    c. Apply a range of strategies (including attention to appropriate register, repetition of information, adjustments in pace, tone, volume, eye contact, and body language based on listener’s response and needs) to monitor and enhance effectiveness of communication with customers, community members, and co-workers.

    4. Listen actively in order to perform competently in a chosen career pathway.
    a. Adapt response to varied speakers and contexts when language is not adjusted for English language learners in order to understand and respond appropriately to extended career-related explanations and narratives, detailed instructions, and complex conversations.
    b. Effectively use a wide range of strategies to repair gaps in understanding and give feedback in order to understand procedures and concepts that affect career specific practices.
    c. Apply linguistic, socio-cultural, and other background knowledge and strategies (such as comparing, integrating, and categorizing information for others) to understand fully the literal and implied intent of the speaker and to respond appropriately.

    5. Use math to solve problems and communicate in order to function competently in an identified career pathway.
    a. Recall and use mathematical procedures appropriately in order to provide accurate information on charts and reports.
    b. Define, select, and organize a variety of common mathematical data and measure with appropriate tools, describe patterns, and/or use appropriate procedures effectively to monitor, chart, and report.
    c. Communicate solutions to problems orally, with visual representations, in writing, by entries in a table or appropriate graph, chart, or with basic statistics.

    6. Develop an Educational/Career Plan in order to secure the desired Corrections or Protection Officer job.
    a. Set career and educational goals as they relate to roles in an identified career pathway and report progress on these goals and revise and update them on a regular basis.

    7. Technology:
    a. Knowledge and Concepts:
    Describe what s/he is able to do with technology using appropriate technological vocabulary.
    Acquire and use the internet vocabulary, such as search engines, web sites, and URLs.
    Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the connection of computers through the internet.
    Begin to apply critical thinking principles, such as separating fact from opinion, drawing conclusions, and
    predicting outcomes to sources retrieved from a computer.
    b. Resource Gatherings:
    Begin to recognize and seek assistance for common technical problems, such as a frozen screen, virus
    warning, and other warnings.
    Perform basic search of the internet with teacher/peer assistance.
    c. Applied Proficiency:
    Use word processing to compose and revise a document, such as business letter or report, with minimal
    errors.
    Use multiple common software, such as spreadsheets, graphics, and multimedia programs.
    Use basic functions of the internet, such as the location bar, back and forward buttons, and bookmarks.
    1. Use functions of email (compose, send, forward, delete, save) to increase written fluency.
  
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    ACCT 101 Survey of Accounting (5 credits)



    Formerly ACCNT 101

    Course Description
    Fundamental theories and concepts of accounting. Emphasizes applications of accounting information to various career programs such as Management and Computer Information Systems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define accounting and its role in the business world.
    2. Analyze, journalize, and post transactions using a double-entry accounting system in a sole proprietorship.
    3. Perform basic accounting tasks such as adjusting and closing entries in accordance with prevalent accounting practice and GAAP(Generally Accepted Accounting Principles).
    4. Generate end-of-period worksheets and statements.
    5. Explain professional ethics in accounting and demonstrate ethical behavior as accounting and bookkeeping tasks are performed.
  
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    ACCT 131 QuickBooks (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ACCT 101  or ACCT& 201  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    A foundational course in processing business transactions using QuickBooks software. Course covers creating and working with company files, transaction processing and banking.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Navigate QuickBooks files
    2. Customize QuickBooks files for individual businesses
    3. Process daily business transactions in QuickBooks
    4. Create financial reports for businesses using QuickBooks functions
  
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    ACCT 136 Excel for Accounting (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ACCT& 201  or ACCT 101  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Learn how to use Excel to record journal entries, financial statements, inventory costing, bank reconciliations, and payroll registers. Data analysis tools will be introduced to perform budgeting and cost analysis.

    Student Outcomes
    Use Excel tools to complete the accounting cycle.
    Calculate inventory cost under different methods by using analysis tools in Excel such as data bars and pivot tables.
    Prepare data that is used in establishing and verifying backup documentation for audit trails.
    Use built-in functions of Excel to determine depreciation, depletion, amortization, and impairment expense for Balance Sheet accounts.
    Design Excel spreadsheets, tables, and graphs to effectively communicate accounting records.
    Use Excel to conduct budgeting and cost analyses using vertical and horizontal analyses on financial statements.
  
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    ACCT 150 Introduction to Accounting and Bookkeeping I (5 credits)



    Prerequisite MATH 096  or MATH 098  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Introduction to basic accounting concepts and procedures. Recording transactions and applying the accounting cycle to prepare financial statements for the sole proprietor for service enterprises.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of accounting and bookkeeping career opportunities.
    2. Define accounting terminology and concepts for sole proprietorships.
    3. Make use of accounting procedures used by sole proprietorships when recording business transactions.
    4. Classify and record transactions in accordance with standard accounting procedures and / or GAAP.
    5. Perform basic accounting tasks such as adjusting and closing entries in accordance with prevalent accounting practice and GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles).
    6. Prepare basic financial statements.
    7. Interpret elements of basic financial statements for sole proprietorships and partnerships.
    8. Define professional ethics in accounting and demonstrate ethical behavior as accounting and bookkeeping tasks are performed.
  
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    ACCT 151 Introduction to Accounting and Bookkeeping II (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ACCT& 201   with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    A continuation of the study accounting concepts and procedures. Accounting procedures for merchandising businesses and partnerships. Basics of accounting for corporations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define accounting terminology and concepts for partnerships and corporations.
    2. Apply accounting procedures used by partnerships and corporations when recording business transactions.
    3. Record and adjust transactions and prepare financial statements for merchandising entities.
    4. Analyze elements of income statements, balance sheets, and statements of retained earnings for corporations.
    5. Demonstrate ethical behavior as accounting and bookkeeping tasks are performed.
  
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    ACCT 179 Federal Income Tax Preparation (5 credits)



    Formerly ACCNT 179

    Course Description
    Federal income tax law and preparation with primary emphasis on individual income tax.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate understanding of the purpose and theory of Federal tax law.
    2. Explain concepts of basic tax planning for individuals
    3. Identify elements of taxable income.
    4. Analyze adjustments to gross income.
    5. Differentiate between categories of allowed deductions.
    6. Describe tax credits available to individual taxpayers.
  
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    ACCT 180 Accounting with Sage 50 (5 credits)



    Formerly ACCNT 180

    Prerequisite CIS 121  or CIS 130  with at least a 2.0 grade, and ACCT 101  or ACCT& 201  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Students will learn about managing and processing financial data in a computerized accounting system using Sage50 software.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the functions of an accounting information system in a business.
    2. Analyze and describe the transactions processing cycles for service, merchandising, and business.
    3. Given various situations, select appropriate procedures for assuring the integrity of the accounting data in a computerized accounting information system.
    4. Demonstrate appropriate procedures to store, back up, and restore data in a computerized accounting information system.
    6. Process service and merchandising business transactions through a commercial computerized integrated accounting program.
  
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    ACCT 275 Payroll and Business Taxes (5 credits)



    Formerly ACCNT 275

    Prerequisite ACCT 101  or ACCT& 201  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Payroll preparations, payroll tax laws, accounting procedures and supplemental records. Preparation of required returns for federal and state payroll and business taxes (including manual and computerized payroll problems).

    Student Outcomes
    1. Determine taxable wages.
    2. Calculate payroll taxes.
    3. Demonstrate understanding of and apply laws applicable to the area of payroll.
    4. Create bookkeeping entries associated with payroll activity.
    5. Describe supplementary records required for payroll activity.
    6. Prepare federal, state and local payroll tax filings.
    7. Determine taxable business activity for state and local reporting.
    8. Compile tax reports for state and local taxing authorities.
  
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    ACCT 276 Nonprofit Management and Reporting (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ACCT& 201  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    This course provides the fundamentals of financial management and reporting requirements for not-for-profit organizations and the rules and regulations covering them.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the development and purpose of the nonprofit sector.
    2. Summarize the regulatory and reporting requirements for nonprofit entities.
    3. Describe funding and financial management issues specific to nonprofits.
    4. Identify quality control and risk management factors in nonprofit entities.
  
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    ACCT 287 Income Tax Practicum (3 credits)



    Formerly ACCNT 287

    Prerequisite ACCT 179  with at least a 1.5 grade.

    Course Description
    Training in the preparation of the basic income tax forms and preparation of actual tax returns under the auspices of an approved mentorship program such as the AARP Tax-Aide program.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze client documents to determine proper classification of reportable items.
    2. Evaluate the appropriateness of gross income exclusions on individual tax returns.
    3. Identify allowed tax deductions and credits.
    4. Calculate tax owed on individual tax returns.
  
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    ACCT& 201 Principles of Accounting I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BUS 210 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 096  or MATH 098  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    First accounting course required for students transferring to a four-year school to pursue a bachelor’s degree in business administration. Covers basic accounting concepts and procedures with a focus on financial statement preparation.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explain the language of business and explore the role of accounting in business decision making.
    2.Explain the historic and regulatory framework of accounting.
    3.Differentiate between three main business entities: sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporation entities and the accounting implications for each.
    4.Prepare the Balance Sheet, Income Statement, and Statement of Owners’ Equity and explain how they are connected.
    5.Differentiate between the cash and accrual bases of accounting.
    6.Analyze and record business transactions including adjusting entries for merchandising and service entities.
    7.Communicate the characteristics of an effective system of internal control for cash receipts and payments.
  
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    ACCT& 202 Principles of Accounting II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BUS 220 - CCN

    Prerequisite ACCT& 201  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Second accounting course typically required of students transferring to a four-year school to obtain a bachelors degree in business administration. Covers partnerships, bonds, corporations, cash flow statements, and financial statement analysis.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify issues associated with accounting for short-term investments and receivables.
    2.Analyze the various inventory methods and identify both income and tax effects
    3.Classify the costs of long-term and intangible assets, and allocate these costs using depreciation/depletion/amortization
    4.Explain accounting for current and contingent liabilities.
    5.Evaluate transactions affecting stockholders’ equity and assess their impact on the financial statements.
    6.Categorize bond and equity investments and assess their implications for corporate financing.
    7.Discuss the importance of developing professional judgment, with an emphasis on how
    it informs accounting for long-term assets and liabilities.
    8.Prepare the Statement of Cash Flows and analyze its relationship with the Income
    Statement and Balance Sheet.
    9.Evaluate corporate annual reports using financial statement analysis.
  
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    ACCT& 203 Principles of Accounting III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BUS 230 - CCN

    Prerequisite ACCT& 201  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    An introduction into the field of managerial accounting. Survey of process and job order costs, budgeting, cash planning, capital budgeting, present value, and other topics.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify fixed and variable and mixed costs and how their behaviors differ and develop understanding of methodology for estimating costs.
    2. Differentiate between product costs and period costs manufacturing.
    3. Demonstrate short-run decision-making techniques such as Cost-Volume-Profit analysis and incremental analysis.
    4. Explain how traditional income statements and contribution margin income statements differ.
    5. Compare and contrast process and job costing and explain their applicability to service and manufacturing businesses.
    6. Construct a master budget for a service business.
    7. Explain standard costing and variance analysis.
    8. Differentiate between absorption costing and variable costing systems.
  
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    ANTH 107 Archaeology of Ancient Civilization (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 106

    Course Description
    We explore the nature and dynamics of the world’s earliest civilizations. We learn how and why complex societies arose, how they differ from simpler societies, what everyday life was like in them, and the strategies elites used to maintain power.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain current and past theoretical perspectives on the rise of complexity.
    2. Distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific approaches to understanding ancient civilizations.
    3. Explain how and why complex societies differ from simpler societies.
    4. Identify, analyze, and discuss the archaeological evidence regarding increasing complexity in different regions of the world.
    5. Analyze and compare the processes leading to increasing complexity in different regions of the world.
    6. Identify, analyze, and discuss the archaeological evidence that tells us how specific ancient civilizations were organized socially, politically, and economically.
    7. Discuss and explain dimensions and dynamics of power and resistance in complex societies.
    8. Explain current and past theoretical perspectives on the collapse of ancient civilizations.
    9. Identify, evaluate, and use appropriate reliable sources for college level research.
  
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    ANTH 167 Cross-Cultural Studies - Life and Culture (2 to 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 167

    Course Description
    Students participating in study abroad programs examine the host country’s cultural values, social institutions, and significant contemporary issues. Students discuss differences between U.S. American and host country’s cultures.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Distinguish between ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, and extreme relativism
    2.Explain the significance of ethnographic research
    3.Discuss the significance of professional standards for anthropological research
    4.Apply the ethnographic perspective in personal interactions
    5.Record observations, personal thoughts, and feelings
    6.Compare cross-cultural differences
  
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    ANTH 240 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspectives (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 240

    Course Description
    An introduction to the anthropology of gender using a global and comparative approach to explore the diversity of women’s experiences and perspectives in relation to their bodies; to men, children, and other women; and to their culture and society.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify, define, and discuss theoretical perspectives on the anthropology of gender.
    2. Distinguish between Western feminism and feminist anthropology.
    3. Compare and discuss global cross-cultural constructions of fertility and reproduction.
    4. Identify, analyze, and compare patterns of love, marriage, and romance from a global cross-cultural perspective.
    5. Define and distinguish between concepts of sex, gender, and sexual orientation.
    6. Examine and discuss the cultural construction of gender from a global cross-cultural perspective.
    7. Discuss gender stratification from a global cross-cultural perspective.
    8. Discuss and compare examples of gendered violence from a global cross-cultural perspective.
    9. Examine and discuss the impact of colonialism and globalization on social, political, and economic situation of women from a global cross-cultural perspective.
  
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    ANTH& 100 Survey of Anthropology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 110-CCN

    Course Description
    A survey of biological anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology and linguistic anthropology.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and define the four major sub-disciplines of anthropology.
    2. Define and apply key elements of the anthropological approach: holism, comparativism, cultural relativism and the culture concept.
    3. Identify and define anthropological research methodology and research techniques.
    4. Identify and discuss the basic principles of biological evolution and evolutionary theory.
    5. Discuss the hominid fossil record.
    6. Identify and discuss principles of archaeological methods and interpretation.
    7. Describe the development of human society and culture over time.
    8. Identify and discuss social organization, identity, and lifeways in cross-cultural perspective.
    9. Describe the complex inter-dependency of language, thought, and culture.
    10. Describe the basic principles of sociolinguistics.
  
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    ANTH& 104 World Prehistory (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 105 - CCN

    Course Description
    An archaeological interpretation of the lifeways of our human ancestors from 3 million years ago to the development of written records.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the elements of a scientific approach to understanding the past.
    2. Use methods and theories of scientific archaeology and palaeoanthropology to construct the prehistoric past.
    3. Identify, discuss, and explain past hominin lifeways, based on fossil and archaeological evidence.
    4. Discuss the impact of climate change on human adaptation.
    5. Identify and explain trends in cultural and technological change over time.
    6. Identify and critically evaluate archaeological interpretations of human geographical expansion into Australia, the Pacific Islands, and the Americas.
    7. Identify and explain regional patterns of adaptation in the Mesolithic.
    8. Explain what domestication, cultivation, and agriculture are and how they are identified in the archaeological record.
    9. Discuss the emergence and evolution of food production in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas.
    10. Define socio-cultural complexity and identify key archaeological correlates.
  
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    ANTH& 106 American Mosaic (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 104 - CCN

    Course Description
    We investigate the nature and dynamics of diversity in the United States today using anthropological approaches and methods. We examine multiple aspects of social identity including ethnicity, “race,” socioeconomic class, gender, and sexuality.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate the anthropological concept of culture.
    2. Identify, analyze, and articulate the construction of individual identity, personal perspective, and personal biases.
    3. Identify, analyze, and discuss the dynamics of institutional and attitudinal discrimination in the U.S.
    4. Identify, define, and discuss ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, and extreme relativism.
    5. Analyze and discuss the multicultural context of the U.S.
    6. Explain the situational aspect of ethnicity.
    7. Distinguish between racial classification and the explanatory approach to human variation.
    8. Distinguish between the concepts of sex, gender, and sexual orientation.
    9. Identify and analyze the complexities of socioeconomic class in the United States.
    10. Identify the diversity of family and household forms in the United States.
    11. Explain how anthropologists learn about culture.
  
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    ANTH& 204 Archaeology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 230-CCN

    Course Description
    Introduction to archaeological method and theory.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and discuss the major changes in archaeology in the past 200 years.
    2. Explain and discuss the nature, aims, and processes of scientific archaeological research.
    3. Apply metric measurement systems to discuss, document, and analyze archaeological data.
    4. Explain appropriate use of sampling strategies in archaeological research.
    5. Identify, discuss, explain and give examples of natural and cultural site formation processes.
    6. Identify, explain, and discuss the appropriate application of various methods for locating archaeological sites.
    7. Identify and explain relative and absolute dating methods and their appropriate application.
    8. Explain and apply principles of stratigraphy, seriation, and stylistic dating in archaeological analysis.
    9. Explain and demonstrate the significance of distributions, associations, and relative amounts for archaeological interpretation.
    10. Identify, classify, and/or analyze artifacts, artifact types (e.g., ceramics, chipped stone) and their attributes using or identifying appropriate analytical techniques (e.g., sourcing, microwear, chemical studies).
    11. Identify, explain, and apply appropriate analytical techniques for the interpretation of seasonality, environmental reconstruction, subsistence systems, and diet.
    12. Discuss and identify appropriate techniques and research questions for the archaeological study of societies of different scales and levels of complexity.
    13. Identify, discuss, and apply appropriate anthropological theory in the interpretation of the dynamics, organization, and interactions among past societies based on archaeological data.
    14. Identify and discuss current cross-cultural, legal, and political issues that impact the practice of archaeology.
  
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    ANTH& 205 Biological Anthropology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 210-CCN

    Course Description
    We examine human biological variation taking into account the complex interaction of biology, physiology, environment, and culture. Major topics include evolution, genetics, non-human primates, the hominin fossil record, and modern human variation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define evolution from a scientific perspective.
    2. Describe the historic contributions made by scientists in the understanding of evolutionary theory (e.g., Linnaeus, Lyell, Malthus, Lamarck, Darwin).
    3. Describe primate classification and taxonomy.
    4. Explain and apply the principles of genetic inheritance.
    5. Analyze population changes in relation to the primary forces of evolution.
    6. Analyze human biological variation using evolutionary theory.
    7. Identify and explain the significance of morphological changes in the paleontological record.
    8. Critically evaluate the concept of race from an anthropological perspective.
  
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    ANTH& 206 Cultural Anthropology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 220-CCN

    Course Description
    We examine human behavior and belief across cultures. We learn how anthropologists work; how culture is created; how and why economic, social, and political systems differ across cultures; and the impacts of colonialism and globalization.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain how cultural anthropology fits into the overall discipline of anthropology.
    2. Explain what culture is, how it is acquired, and how it works.
    3. Distinguish and illustrate the concepts of ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, and extreme relativism.
    4. Apply an ethnographic perspective to compare and discuss subsistence and economic systems across cultures.
    5. Apply an ethnographic perspective to compare and discuss marriage, family, kinship systems, and descent across cultures.
    6. Apply an ethnographic perspective to compare and discuss political systems and social control across cultures.
    7. Apply an ethnographic perspective to compare and discuss social differentiation across cultures.
    8. Explain and illustrate religion / worldview from an anthropological perspective.
    9. Identify and discuss the impacts of and responses to colonialism, modernization, and globalization.
    10. Discuss global citizenship and contemporary issues from an anthropological perspective.
  
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    ANTH& 210 Indians of North America (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 250-CCN

    Course Description
    We explore the lifeways and cultures of North American Indians from prehistory until the present. Culture areas could include the Northeast, Southeast, Southwest, Plains, Arctic, Subarctic, Plateau, Great Basin, California, and the Northwest Coast.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define and explain important anthropological concepts such as culture, multiculturalism, cultural relativism and ethnocentrism.
    2. Identify anthropological research methodology techniques, and contributions to the study of the native peoples of North America.
    3. Identify and discuss stereotypes of North American Indians.
    4. Identify and discuss the major culture areas of native North America.
    5. Discuss the strengths and limitations of the concept of culture areas.
    6. Identify and explain how archaeology has contributed to understanding of the native cultures of North America.
    7. Discuss how archaeology is viewed and used by native peoples today.
    8. Describe the range and complex interdependency of beliefs, institutions, and practices of native peoples, both in general and within a culture area.
    9. Identify and discuss the impact of Euroamerican contact on the native peoples.
    10. Identify and discuss the impact and contributions of native cultures on historical and contemporary North American culture and society.
    11. Describe and discuss contemporary political, legal, and social issues facing native peoples.
  
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    ANTH& 216 Northwest Coast Indians (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 260-CCN

    Course Description
    Exploration of the culture and lifeways of Indians of the Northwest Coast culture area, past and present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and discuss key concepts within cultural anthropological theory and theoretical perspectives.
    2. Discuss social and political pre-history and history of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.
    3. Use an ethnographic perspective to identify and discuss the social and political structure of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.
    4. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American cultural perspectives on marriage, family, kinship systems, and descent.
    5. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American perspectives on political systems, social control, and conflict.
    6. Describe Northwest Coast Native American patterns of subsistence and the complexities of social ecology in the Pacific Northwest.
    7. Discuss the importance of the potlatch to the social and political structure of Northwest Coast Native American cultures.
    8. Identify and discuss Northwest Coast Native American perspectives on religion, art, and the aesthetic universe.
    9. Critically evaluate and discuss the complexities of Native American/United States legal relations and relationships.
    10. Critically evaluate and discuss issues surrounding and pertaining to Native American sovereignty.
  
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    ANTH& 236 Forensic Anthropology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ANTHR 215 - CCN

    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize students with the forensic analysis of human remains. Theoretical and hands-on analyses of human remains within a medicolegal context.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Successfully identify the bones and teeth of the human skeleton.
    2. Explain taphonomic indicators.
    3. Demonstrate proper procedures for the recovery of human remains.
    4. Describe the techniques and tools utilized in the analyses of human remains.
    5. Apply forensic techniques in the identification and interpretation of human remains.
    6. Interpret and describe pathology and trauma on decedent.
    7. Integrate an ethical approach and cultural respect when conducting forensic analyses.
  
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    ART 101 Design, Beginning (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio laboratory course which presents the elements of design as sources for artistic invention. Lectures, demonstrations and studio work deal with line, edge, shape, area, texture and value as vital elements in creative design.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Paint a composition using black and white while seeking to have both black and white shapes play the
    role of both the figure and ground.
    2. Apply the concepts of continuous and discontinuous visual connections.
    3. Utilize abstract, non-representational shapes to assist in seeing the building blocks of composition.
    4. Utilize full value change to aid in identifying variety and to build a compositional hierarchy.
    5. Identify the concepts of value keys and value contrasts.
    6. Demonstrate the concepts of open and closed shapes using value and texture.
    7. Analyze examples of composition content from various cultures.
    8. Paint a monochromatic composition which replicates the shapes and values of the achromatic design.
    9. Employ warm and cool color mixing and use in a composition.
    10.Examine basic color theory including primary and secondary color schemes
  
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    ART 102 Design, Intermediate (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ART 101  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A studio laboratory course which presents the elements of design as sources for artistic invention. Studio work deals with line, edge, shape, area, texture and value. Particular emphasis will be placed on color as an element of creative design.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use a dominant grid structure.
    2. Use a dominant circle structure and a triad scheme.
    3. Use a dominant diamond structure and a double complementary color scheme.
    4. Study the compositional value structure of a masterwork.
    5. Demonstrate spatial placement by using opaque color mixing to simulate transparency of overlapping planes.
    6. Examine examples of composition content from various cultures.
  
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    ART 105 Introduction to Art (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ART 100

    Course Description
    A general introduction to the visual arts, designed to develop within the student an insight and comprehension of the actual works of art. Topics include perception, aesthetics, creativity, elements of design, principles of design, role of the media, and a general chronological survey of the visual arts.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual thinking and art criticism.
    2.Recognize variations of media in drawings, painting, prints and sculpture and the relationship between media characteristics, idea, and artwork.
    3.Define the role of significant visual elements and principles of design in a work of art.
    4.Identify major art styles and their characteristics.
    5.Recognize the contributions of individuals and the various cross cultural influences in the history of art.
  
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    ART 107 Beginning Digital Photography (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Basic knowledge of computers and manually controlled digital camera required.

    Course Description
    Photography for the beginning student, covering aesthetic considerations and basic equipment operation and processing related to a digital camera.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Apply rudimentary observation and aesthetic skills to the creation of a photographic image
    2.Analyze how photography and, more recently, digital imaging has impacted artistic and social history
    3.Use a digital camera to express a creative and personal vision
    4.Develop basic technical skills to explore and alter digital images
    5.Critically analyze photographic images
    6.Safely handle tools and/or chemical materials
    7. Become familiar with vocabulary specific to photography and the visual arts
  
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    ART 111 Drawing Beginning (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An entry level drawing course that provides a framework for a variety of themes, materials, and techniques. This is an exploratory course that focuses on the observation and representation of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional surface.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create original drawings which demonstrate the ability to interpret the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional picture plane.
    2. Increased visual awareness and acquisition of basic observational and representational skills.
    3. Recognize and demonstrate compositional integrity through objective analysis and synthesis of the formal elements of art (line, shape, value, texture, form and space).
    4. Exhibit dedication and professional growth through a variety of creative applications of: line weight and variation, proportion, comparative measurement, and perspective.
    5. Demonstrate ability to use light logic and chiaroscuro to create the illusion of three-dimensional volume and form.
    6. A portfolio that exhibits technical, conceptual, and creative growth.
    7. Greater awareness and appreciation of historical and contemporary approaches to drawing
  
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    ART 112 Drawing Intermediate (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ART 111  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This intermediate course is an extension of the fundamentals of representational drawing. This course is designed to allow the serious student to develop skills as a draftsman and broaden capabilities for personal expression.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create original drawings which demonstrate the ability to interpret the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional picture plane.
    2. Recognize and demonstrate compositional integrity through objective analysis and synthesis of the formal elements of art.
    3. Expand knowledge about various drawing methods such as contour, gesture, hatching, and accent lines to record shapes and build value in complex compositional space.
    4. Analyze and explore more alternative and experimental uses of mixed media to develop stronger connections between form, content, and conceptual expression.
    5. Recognize and articulate objective critical analysis of peers’ work in progress during small group critiques.
    6. Reinforce drawing concepts and skill through practice observational sketches in drawing journal.
    7. Research and interpret concepts and styles from the history of art for original translations reflective of individual’s artistic voice.
    8. Demonstrate ability to render chiaroscuro form through subtractive modeling of transitions in tone.
    9. Exploit spatial relationships of figure and ground in composition to create extraordinary passages and abstractions of positive and negative space.
    10. Develop disciplined focus and scholarly inquiry in classroom research, discussion, and critiques.
  
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    ART 113 Drawing Advanced (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ART 112  or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course builds upon the foundation of contemporary and classical approaches to drawing and is an extension of the fundamentals of representational drawing. This course is designed to allow the serious student to develop skills as a draftsman and broaden capabilities for personal expression.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create original drawings which demonstrate the student's capacity to perceive, comprehend and interpret the three-dimensional world using various media techniques.
    2. Synthesize the formal art elements and principles with the observed world to create unity and harmony in varying compositional formats. 
    3. Expand upon the foundations of representational strategies that give direction to emotional and psychological content.
    4. Demonstrate ability to use light logic to create the illusions of mass and motion. Model drawings to create chiaroscuro in various light conditions.
    5. Develop disciplined focus and scholarly inquiry in classroom discussions, critiques and portfolio presentation.
    6. Exhibit dedication and professional growth through a variety of creative applications expressing personal style and voice.
  
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    ART 115 3-Dimensional Design (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A non-computer hands on sculpture studio lab course that introduces the student to various approaches to constructing three-dimensional forms.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Use principles of unity, variety, balance, and scale, lines, plane, mass, volume and texture to create and critique 3-dimensional designs.
    2.Demonstrate knowledge of basic techniques and tools to create 3-dimensional designs
    3.Demonstrate knowledge of safe practices for handling tools and materials in the studio
    4.Demonstrate awareness and appreciation of history of 3-dimensional design to create and critique projects
  
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    ART 145 History of Art - Contemporary (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A concise history of contemporary painting, sculpture, drawings, printmaking, photography, and mixed media from modern foundations through post-modern styles and related issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual thinking and art criticism.

    2. Define the role of basic visual elements and principles of design and iconography work of art.

    3. Recognize basic variations of media in painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography and mixed media.
    4. Identify major styles and their characteristics that evolved in the modern world in the mid 19th century through the 20th century.

    5. Recognize the contributions of individuals and the various cross cultural influences
    and characteristics of the art of the mid 19th century through the 20th century
  
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    ART 150 Printmaking Beginning (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio course covering the processes of printmaking. Students will learn how to make prints from compositions. Methods used will include the Intaglio and Relief  processes. Students will leave with a knowledge of hand-pulled printmaking practices.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Implement the technique of using line and value in order to describe form and content.
    2. Identify paper type and sides, plus tear, and registering methods.
    3. Demonstrate proper preparation of paper and/or plates (print matrix) for printing process.
    4. Identify and use safe materials and methods.
    5. Demonstrate understanding of history, materials, and artists’ contributions to the tradition of fine art printmaking.
  
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    ART 201 Painting, Beginning (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio course exploring the fundamental concepts and techniques of painting with acrylic media. Assignments will be approached primarily through investigation of content, composition, color theory, paint mixing and application.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine and explore acrylic painting techniques. (Individual exercises and techniques).
    2. Recognize and apply fundamental design concepts to the organization of compositional space.
    3. Develop small scale exercises exploring color, value, and texture studies.
    4. Research and incorporate historical and contemporary art styles and approaches into personal
    expression.
    5. Analyze, interpret, and evaluate one’s own work and the work of others.
    6. Employ safe and ecologically sound painting and disposal practices.
    7. Present a portfolio of work that demonstrates technical and creative gains.
  
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    ART 202 Painting, Intermediate (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ART 201  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An Intermediate course expanding on the principles of representational painting, compositional, and technique. Students will develop increased formal, technical and expressive skills. Emphasis will be given to problem solving and personal expression.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate advances in technical skills and compositional planning, insight, and resolution.
    2. Define and apply the specialized vocabulary and standard nomenclature used in painting.
    3. Develop small scale exercises exploring different painting approaches, such as, Scumbling, Impasto,
    Alla Prima, and Glazing.
    4. Demonstrate a greater understanding and appreciation of how color, value, and compositional design
    relate to content.
    5. Consider and incorporate knowledge of historical and contemporary art theories and approaches in
    relation to personal expression.
    6. Perceive, analyze and interpret the elements that make paintings successful.
    7. Employ safe and ecologically sound painting and disposal practices.
    8. Present a portfolio of works demonstrating mastery of course objectives and originality of personal
    expression.
  
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    ART 203 Painting, Advanced (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ART 201  and ART 202  with at least a 1.5 grade in each of these classes or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    An advanced course expanding on the principles of representational painting, compositional, and technique. Students will develop increased formal, technical and expressive skills. Emphasis will be given to problem solving and personal expression.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate advanced in technical skills and compositional planning, insight and resolution.
    2. Define and apply the specialized vocabulary and standard nomenclature used in painting.
    3. Develop small scale exercises exploring different painting approaches, such as Scumbling, Impasto, Alla Prima, and Glazing.
    4. Demonstrate a greater understanding and appreciation of how color, value, and compositional design relate to content.
    5. Consider and incorporate knowledge of historical and contemporary art theories and approaches in relation to personal expression.
    6. Perceive, analyze and interpret the elements that make paintings successful.
    7. Employ safe and ecologically sound painting and disposal practices.
    8. Present a portfolio of works demonstrating mastery of course objectives and originality of personal expression.
  
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    ART 204 Watercolor, Beginning (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio course that will explore the elements of watercolor techniques. Students will express themselves using methods applicable to transparent and opaque watercolor approache and also gain a historical overview of watercolor.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Students will gain experience with and acquire competency in sketching and painting techniques.
    2.Students will learn to generate, plan and organize creative individual projects and see them through to completion.
    3.Students will learn to interpret and express both still life and natural forms both creatively and illustratively.
    4.Students will be able to use a variety of textural techniques, design concepts and mixed-media combinations.
    5.Students will develop greater imaginative and visualization skills.
    6.Students will expand their knowledge of the historical and theoretical backgrounds of painting.
    7.Students will develop awareness of correct product handling, safety and ecology in painting.
    8.Students will heighten appreciation of their natural and human aesthetic environment and the importance of it’s role in the world.
  
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    ART 211 Beginning Sculpture (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio lab course that introduces students to materials, processes, and tools for the creation and consideration of sculptural design, with an emphasis on the use of non-hazardous and sustainable materials.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use principles of mass, volume and texture, balance and scale, figure and ground to create and critique sculptural designs
    2.Demonstrate knowledge of basic tools and techniques, including mold making, to create sculptural designs.
    3.Demonstrate awareness of non-hazardous and sustainable materials for the creation of sculptural designs
    4.Demonstrate knowledge of safe practices for handling tools and materials in the studio
    5.Demonstrate awareness and appreciation of history of sculptural design to create and critique sculptural designs
  
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    ART 215 Art for Teachers (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introduction to the visual arts as applied to the development of young children birth through grade 3. Explores theory, technique, and curriculum design to offer a variety of developmentally appropriate media to children and curriculum creation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the value and breadth of creative processes human beings use.
    2. Plan art curriculum for children birth through grade 3 who are culturally, linguistically and ability diverse and communicate classroom applications of art education and philosophy.
    3. Recognize and describe stages of art development in young children birth through third grade and articulate connections between art development to other disciplines, developmental domains, classroom curriculum, and classroom environmental design.
    4. Use professional and safe art tools, equipment, and materials in order to prepare classroom environments for creative and multicultural art experiences, and identify resources for procurement.
    5. Identify and describe three elements and three principles of design, which could be used in conversation with children in an art center.
    6. Simulate the teacher’s role in providing positive, specific verbal and nonverbal feedback to children regarding their artwork using the vocabulary of art.
    7. Research and present information about an artist and his/her works of art, including style characteristics, style name, culture, content, and intent, to provide a basis for displaying diverse artistic works in the classroom.
    8. Utilize various media appropriate in early learning programs such as crayons, pencils, markers, paints, clay, doughs, chalk, adhesives, fabric, yarn/string to determine its function and application.
    9. Discuss the ethical and cultural implications of using food as art in centers for children.
  
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    ART 243 History of Art - Ancient World Through the Middle Ages (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A concise chronological history of paintings, sculpture, drawings, and architecture from the dawn of recorded art to the gothic movement and related issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual analysis, art criticism, and critical vocabulary.
    2. Define the role of basic visual elements and principles of design, architecture, and iconography within a cultural and social context.
    3. Identify basic types of media and styles prevalent in architecture, painting, sculpture, drawing, and mixed media.
    4. Identify major approaches and their characteristics that evolved from the dawn of humanity to the end of the gothic period. .
  
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    ART 244 History of Art- Renaissance Through Rococo (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A concise chronological history of paintings, sculpture, drawings, printmaking, and architecture form the early Renaissance of the 15th century to the Neoclassical style of the middle mark of the 19th century and related issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual analysis, art criticism, and critical vocabulary.
    2. Define the role of basic visual elements and principles of design, architecture, and iconography within a cultural and social context.
    3. Identification of basic types of media and styles prevalent in architecture, painting, sculpture, drawing, and mixed media.
    4. Identify major styles and their characteristics that evolved in the dawn of the15th century Renaissance through the middle mark of the 19th century.
    5. Identify and explain the contributions of individuals and the various cross cultural influences.
    6. Examine and analyze gender issues and the role of non-western aesthetic traditions.
  
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    ART 245 History of Art - The Modern World (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A concise history of architecture, painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, and mixed media from modern foundations through post-modern styles and related issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual thinking and art criticism.
    2. Define the role of basic visual elements and principles of design vocabulary and iconography in works of art.
    3. Identification of basic types of media and styles prevalent in architecture, painting, sculpture, drawing, and mixed media.
    4. Identify the major styles of art and their characteristics from the mid 19th century through the 21st century.
    5. Identify and explain the contributions of individuals and the various cross cultural influences of art.
  
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    ART 260 Art in Motion: Real and Recorded (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities with Performance; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A studio course that will introduce concepts of time-based artwork using a variety of processes and media. Students explore concepts of sequence, interactivity, process and documentation through video, audio and performance as an art.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the terminology and processes that connect all time-based modes of creating art through evidence in created projects and written assignments.
    2. Produce art that engages time as an element within a historical and theoretical framework.
    3. Demonstrate their aptitude for responding to a class project from ideation through process and production to fruition by showing the progression of a work through sketches, experiments, and demonstrations to it’s final version.
    4. Properly use the tools and technology related to time-based art presented through class projects.
    5. Observe and utilize the nuances of conceptual choices and their outcomes as they relate to a given situation by producing work that contains content that is aware and intentional.
    6. Demonstrate an ability to consider and find an appropriate level of finish and presentation for a particular set of ideas and modes of working.
    7. Engage in a constructive critical discourse and theory about time-based work of art through verbal and written critiques.
    8. Exhibit the value of the importance of context in time-based artwork in relation to art history and a contemporary practice by producing work that is situated appropriately in an art historically aware and contemporary setting.
    9. Demonstrate the ability to speak about time-based art in an articulate and critical manner using vocabulary appropriate to the medium as shown in sketchbooks, journals, exercises, research and critiques .
  
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    ART& 100 Art Appreciation (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ART 110 - CCN

    Course Description
    A general introduction to a chronological look at the development of Western art from cave painting to the end of the 20th Century. This class is for the non-art major and there are no prerequisites.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply fundamental methods of visual thinking.
    2. Develop critical thinking skills with an emphasis on vocabulary as used in describing the visual arts.
    3. Describe media and its relationship to subject, content, and function.
    4. Recognize style characteristics, style name, culture, content, and intent.
    5. Identify the contributions of individual and various cross cultural visual influences.
  
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    ASL& 121 American Sign Language I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    A beginning course in American Sign Language using conversational methods. This includes vocabulary related to exchanging personal information, day-to-day common activities, describing family relationships, and providing basic directions. Basic grammar, finger-spelling, numbers 1–100, the fundamentals of spatial agreement, and an introduction to the deaf culture and its history are also introduced.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate receptively and expressively the ability to utilize a vocabulary of 400+ signs to construct basic conversations pertaining to the content of this course, such as: exchanging personal information, including describing basic day-to-day activities, basic family relationships and appearance, traveling to school or work, basic needs, and basic directions of a location or the surroundings.
    2. Research, read, and provide information about ASL history, key historical events and people, and topics that are within the scope of the content of this course.
    3. Interpret and verify basic directions using spatial agreement, including signer’s perspective, real-world orientation, and eye gaze.
    4. Construct basic sentences and questions, and apply NMGM (non-manual grammatical markers) appropriately while asking a yes/no or “wh” question.
    5. Demonstrate the various ways to negotiate a signing environment and how to get others’ attention, such as a wave or a light flicker. 
    6. Construct and comprehend basic sentences using classifiers to show action, size, and shape of a noun.
    7. Request and provide information regarding course content both receptively and expressively.
    8. Generate, translate, and comprehend NMS (non-manual signals) to show meaning. 
    9. Finger-spell using correct palm orientation with a slight shift with some letters to demonstrate basic flow and fluency.
    10. Identify and use the numbers 1–100 in real-life situations for basic counting and ages.
  
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    ASL& 122 American Sign Language II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 121   with at least a 2.0 grade; or 1 year high school equivalent. 

    Course Description
    In ASL& 122, students will continue developing their sign skills while building on vocabulary, enhancing number skills, learning more about classifiers, increasing fluency and incorporating non-manual grammatical markers and non-manual signals with more ease. They will be introduced to basic story telling using these new skills and techniques as well as learn more about deaf culture and grammar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize a vocabulary of 600+ signs in order to participate in and create conversations pertaining to the content of this course, such as: agreement verbs/directional verbs; talking about chores, errands, and activities; identifying and describing people and personal items; and calendar concepts.
    2. Create and demonstrate sentences or questions using cardinal numbers 1–50,000 in context, time, o’clock, money, phone numbers, years, age, miles, MPH, how often, nouns plural, and quantity. 
    3. Construct and retell basic stories using ranking and sequencing, role-shifting, topic-comment, OSV (object-subject-verb) and SVO (subject-verb-object), and rhetorical questions.
    4. Apply and demonstrate the appropriate NMGM and NMS (non-manual grammar markers and non-manual signals) while formulating various types of sentence structures, such as rhetorical questions, and using topic-comment (T-C) statements.
    5. Formulate sentences and questions demonstrating the appropriate use of plain, inflecting, and directional verbs.
    6. Examine and summarize basic information including name signs, audism, negotiating a deaf environment, asking for repetition, looking at unbiased hiring, and identifying well-known names in the deaf community such as Clayton Valli, and other topics that are within the scope of the content of this course.
    7. Practice and broaden use of classifiers while including Pronominal, Locative, Semantic, Perimeter, and Size and Shape Specifiers to show action, placement, movement and/or appearance of the noun. 
    8. Utilize various grammatical structures to include elements to tell a cohesive story, and maintain spatial agreement in order to tell a personal experience story and present to class.
    9. Create and demonstrate using a calendar, including talking about activities with others, including the day of the week, which week (up to 3 weeks in the past or future), and the activity. 
    10. Interpret and translate from ASL to written English while watching stories told by various native signers.
  
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    ASL& 123 American Sign Language III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 122 American Sign Language II (5 credits) ASL& 122 or 2 years high school American Sign Language.

    Course Description
    ASL& 123 focuses on increasing expressive and receptive skills, vocabulary development, additional grammar features, and developing storytelling techniques.

    Student Outcomes
    Participate in advanced beginner to low intermediate level conversations while utilizing a vocabulary of 1000+ signs.
    Apply the use of conjunctions, modals, role shifting, spatial awareness, and rhetorical questions while formulating sentences, questions, and stories.
    Engage in advanced beginner to low intermediate conversations and storytelling using ASL.
    Demonstrate how a sign can vary in meaning depending on the context and use of sign inflections (prosody and aspect). 
    Demonstrate how to use a variety of numbers including age, money, time, the calendar, quantity of a noun, historical information, and time (o’clock) through short scenarios. .
    Develop Deaf cultural awareness through social and relational experiences.
    Translate stories told by various Deaf individuals from ASL to English while noticing the smaller details and subtleties of non-manual-signals (NMS).
  
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    ASL& 221 American Sign Language IV (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SIGN 201 - CCN

    Prerequisite ASL& 123 , with a grade of 2.0 or better; or 3 years high school equivalent.

    Course Description
    Emphasis is placed on receptive and expressive skill development and ASL fluency. Attention is given to the correct formation of signs, movement, rhythm, phrasing and clarity. This course includes intensive vocabulary building, a deeper understanding of ASL expressions, and proficiency in ASL grammar.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate receptively and expressively the ability to utilize a vocabulary of 1000 + signs to construct and participate in intermediate level conversations.
    2. Create a variety of cohesive stories on various topics while engaging in intermediate use of the language.
    3. Engage in complex conversations using ASL.
    4. Construct and demonstrate examples of how a sign can vary in meaning depending on the context and use of sign inflections.
    5. Interact in more complex conversations related to deaf culture.
    6. Develop deeper cultural awareness through research on various topics that are within the scope of the content of this course and provide information using ASL.
    7. Translate from ASL to English while noticing the smaller details and subtleties of non-manual-signals (NMS).
  
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    ASL& 222 American Sign Language V (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ASL& 221   with at least a 2.0 grade; or 4 years high school equivalent plus placement in ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    The importance of signing with sufficient grammatical accuracy and vocabulary is emphasized. Emphasis is placed on participating effectively in formal and informal conversations on familiar and unfamiliar topics. There will be many opportunities to develop a stronger acceptance and appreciation of the diverse regional aspects of ASL and expand on personal applications of the language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize/draw upon a vocabulary of over 500 signs related to areas of food, careers, the workplace, and the home.
    2. Formulate sentences and questions using a variety of verb types and appropriate NMS and NMGM.
    3. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the grammatical aspects of topicalization and spatialization, including conditional sentences, relative clauses, rhetorical questions, classifiers, and contrastive structure.
    4. Integrate a broader understanding of role shifting and incorporate this skill into retelling an experience.
    5. Utilize a broader breadth of numbers both receptively and expressively in dialogue and narration.
    6. Produce an articulate and well-organized progression of ideas and concepts utilizing sequencing, transitions, and phrasing.
    7. Experience highly fluent ASL provided by native signers. This includes at least 5 receptive translations and 2 copy-sign assignments.
    8. Incorporate a variety of skills learned from the quarter while completing these 2 assignments: retell a children’s story that has a repetitive theme and descriptively translate a visual landscape scenario assignment.
    9. Participate in discussions of deaf culture from literature such as Seeing Language in Sign by Jane Maher and volunteer/interact within the deaf community to broaden understanding of the culture and issues.
  
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    ASL& 223 American Sign Language VI (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ASL& 222   with at least a 2.5 grade. 

    Course Description
    In ASL& 223, emphasis is placed on receptive and expressive skill development including discourse structures used in discussing a variety of topics, spontaneous conversations, and story-telling. The course will encourage vocabulary review, clear articulation of the language, continued practice of grammar structures, exposure to a variety of signing styles, and a deeper cultural awareness about interacting effectively in the Deaf community.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Utilize/draw upon a vocabulary of over 500 signs related to areas of sports, travel, politics, theater/drama, occupations, education, and various spontaneous topics.
    2. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the grammatical aspects of topicalization, conditional sentences, relative clauses, rhetorical questions, contrastive structure, classifiers, using modified verbs (such as continuous aspect), and non-verb agreement.
    3. Produce an articulate and well-organized progression of ideas and concepts utilizing sequencing, transitions, and phrasing.
    4. Participate in discussions of deaf culture from literature such as Forbidden Signs by Douglas Baynton, and Never the Twain Shall Meet by Richard Winefield and volunteer/interact within the deaf community to broaden understanding of the culture and issues.
    5. Utilize real-world situations on a variety of topics both structured and spontaneous to demonstrate an enhanced ability to adjust sign styles depending on register.
    6. Incorporate key elements while telling a story including placement of characters or objects, movement of characters or objects, maintaining continuity, transitions, character development, and special features.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to accurately and clearly reproduce rote memorization of ASL passages provided by native signers and provide more detailed translations of ASL narratives into English narratives.
    8. Utilize a broader breadth of numbers both receptively and expressively in dialogue and real-world situations including finances, ratios, fractions, and percentages.
    9. Actively participate in the Deaf community attending events, socializing, and networking.
  
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    ASTR 105 Life in the Universe (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ASTR 115

    Course Description
    An introductory course for non-science majors that examines the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology. General principles of astronomy, chemistry, biology, geology; as applied toward the search for life on other planetary bodies. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the history of astronomy and scientific process that led to our current understanding of our place in the universe
    2. Analyze critically light curves and spectra of astronomical objects to determine physical properties
    3. Describe the basic chemistry of life on Earth
    4. Describe and apply ways in which we can find the relative and absolute ages of fossils/rocks/events in Earth’s history
    5. Rank geological and biological events in Earth’s history in chronological order and describe the basic relationship between Earth’s systems and life through geologic time, including the origin and life on earth
    6. Define life in the context of the search for life elsewhere
    7. Identify factors that make Earth habitable and how that habitability has changed over time
    8. Compare the conditions under which extremophiles on Earth live with conditions found on other planetary bodies
    9. Analyze the cost-benefit of different types of astrobiology spacecraft missions
    10. Assess the habitability of a world
    11. Explain the main methods of detecting extrasolar planets and how each method is biased
    12. Apply the Drake equation to the search for communicating, extra-terrestrial civilizations
    13. Develop knowledge of data sources in the fields of astronomy, biology, geology, chemistry, and physics
    14. Break problems into smaller, more specific pieces as part of the decision making process
    15. Integrate and analyze quantitative and qualitative information and ideas in several contexts (e.g. examine the physical conditions found on Mars and examine those conditions through the eyes of a chemist, repeat the exercise as seen though the eyes of a biologist, and repeat the exercise as seen through the eyes of a geologist)
  
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    ASTR& 100 Survey of Astronomy (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ASTR 100 - CCN

    Course Description
    An introduction to the history of astronomy and to scientific inquiry including basic concepts in observational astronomy, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the origin of the universe. This is a non-lab course.

    Student Outcomes
    Articulate the process of scientific inquiry and discovery as it applies to astronomy.
    Describe the historical context in which our understanding of the universe has evolved.
    Compare the relative size and scope of astronomical objects and timescales.
    Differentiate the processes that govern the evolution of the universe and life within it.
  
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    ASTR& 110 The Solar System (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ASTR 150 - CCN)

    Course Description
    Methods and goals of scientific inquiry developed within the study of solar system including the planets, Sun, moons, asteroids, and comets. Includes historical perspective, theories, laboratory exercises, and direct observations. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    Articulate the process of scientific inquiry and discovery as it applies to solar systems.
    Describe the historical context in which our understanding of solar systems has evolved.
    Compare the relative size and scope of astronomical objects and timescales in solar systems.
    Differentiate the processes that govern the evolution of solar systems and the potential for life within them.
    Analyze quantitative data, evaluate qualitative information, and integrate experience, reason and information to examine assumptions and draw scientific conclusions within multiple contexts.
    Evaluate and selectively use appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate data on various topics related to solar systems.
  
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    ASTR& 115 Stars, Galaxies & Cosmos (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ASTR 140-CCN

    Course Description
    Methods and goals of scientific inquiry developed within the study of outer space including the life and death of stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies, and cosmology including the Big Bang. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    Articulate the process of scientific inquiry and discovery as it applies to the stars, galaxies and cosmos.
    Describe the historical context in which our understanding of the stars, galaxies and cosmos has evolved.
    Compare the relative size and scope of astronomical objects and timescales in the universe.
    Differentiate the processes that govern the evolution of the universe and life within it.
    Analyze quantitative data, evaluate qualitative information, and integrate experience, reason and information to examine assumptions and draw scientific conclusions within multiple contexts.
    Evaluate and selectively use appropriate tools and sources in order to access and manipulate data on various topics in astronomy.
  
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    ATMOS 101 Introduction to Weather (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A study of Earth’s atmosphere and major controls of weather and climate; including solar radiation, temperature, pressure, wind, clouds, precipitation, severe weather, pollution, and climate change. For non-science and science majors. Includes Lab.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe the major elements and controls of weather and climate.
    2.Recognize Earth as a system and describe the four major “spheres” of planet Earth and the major thermal spheres of the atmosphere.
    3.Analyze the gaseous composition of the atmosphere.
    4.Describe the basic motions of Earth and the relationship to the seasons and the length of daylight.
    5.Distinguish between the basic mechanisms of energy transfer and give examples of each.
    6.Diagram the movement of water and energy through the hydrologic cycle.
    7.Calculate relative humidity and dew point from weather instruments and weather tables.
    8.Discuss the formation of fog, dew, clouds, and major forms of precipitation.
    9.Visually identify the major cloud types and associated weather conditions.
    10.Explain air pressure and the general weather conditions associated with high and low pressure.
    11.Discuss the possible causes of climate change and differentiate between the major air pollution components and their effects on the environment and human health.
    12.Interpret middle latitude weather patterns in relation to air masses, fronts, and cyclonic storms.
    13.Relate the development of severe weather to hazard risk, including hurricanes, tornadoes, and thunderstorms. Apply scientific classification and intensity scales to these storms.
    14.Summarize the major tools of weather forecasting and the potentials and limitations of forecasts.
    15.Critical Thinking: Using Ideas and Information. Integrate and analyze information and ideas to form conclusions and understand effects (e.g. use observation of current weather conditions to make forecasts).
    16.Effective Communication: Recognize and use a variety of methods and styles to convey ideas and information (e.g. record and interpret weather data from instruments and field observations).
    17. Evaluate Sources. Evaluate and use meteorological data sources to interpret weather maps, construct isopleth maps, analyze satellite imagery, and utilize various weather graphics. Accesse and interpret meteorological and climatological data from the Internet.
    18. Appraises .Appraises information in order to explain and diagram the major components of the global circulation system (e.g. pressure systems, prevailing wind belts, and major ocean currents)
  
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    BIOL& 100 Survey of Biology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Emphasis on the study of cells, genetics, ecology, diversity of life, and physiology in order to establish a foundation of understanding and respect of life. This course includes a lab.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Discriminate between subjective and scientifically objective standards in all media while applying the Scientific Method.
    2.Describe the structure of an atom, and how these form ionic, covalent and hydrogen bonds; list the four macromolecular classes, their function and monomeric units, and diagram the hydrolysis and dehydration synthesis of macromolecules.
    3.Describe diffusion, osmosis, and active transport.
    4.Define energy and how it relates to biological systems, and discuss the importance to life and the interrelationship between cellular respiration and photosynthesis.
    5.Identify the differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells.
    6.Describe an overview of the process and outcomes of DNA replication, transcription and translation.
    7.Describe similarities and differences in modes of cellular reproduction.
    8.Compare and contrast the three domains of life in the context of evolutionary theory.
    9.Describe the fundamental structures, functions and interrelationships within ecosystems.
    10.Describe the impact of one’s personal behavior on local and global ecosystems.
    11.Identify key components and applications of genetics.
  
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    BIOL& 160 General Biology w/Lab (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite MATH 096  with at least a  2.0 grade or eligible for MATH 098  AND eligible for ENGL& 101 . Completed CHEM& 100  or CHEM& 139  with at least a 2.0 grade or concurrently enrolled in CHEM& 121  or CHEM& 161  or beyond.

    Course Description
    The science of life. Scientific methodology, evolution, ecological perspectives, cells, biotechnology, genetics, diversity of life, metabolism and reproduction. Lab included. For students preparing for allied health professions and for science majors.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Summarize and apply the scientific method, including experimental and control groups.
    2. Describe the structure and function of atoms, isotopes, ions and molecules; define the monomer and arrangements into polymers of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, ATP, and describe their roles in biological chemistry.
    3. Describe the process of DNA replication and protein synthesis.
    4. Define the cell and cell theory; describe and explain the ultra-structure of a typical cell; identify cell organelles and describe their functions.
    5. Summarize the mechanisms of cellular transport and membrane function.
    6. Summarize the mechanisms and relevance of photosynthesis and cellular respiration and identify where these processes occur in the cell.
    7. Define cell cycle; explain how mitosis differs from meiosis; discuss what role mitotic and meiotic cell division play in the life of an organism.
    8. Explain Mendel’s law of segregation and independent assortment; list some traits which are transmitted/inherited through the current understanding of genetics.
    9. Evaluate theory of natural selection; explain mechanisms of evolution.
    10. Define taxonomy, binomial nomenclature, species and population; describe the current domain taxonomy system.
    11. Describe a typical ecosystem.
    12. Evaluate the impact of human beings on the environment.
    13. Demonstrate standard safety practices in an environment lab, related to personal protective equipment, glassware handling, and disposal of laboratory materials.
    14. Using living material, prepare a wet-mount slide and examine it under the microscope.
    15. Demonstrate proper hands-on use and care of a compound light microscope.
    16. Exploration of biological science application to STEM and healthcare.
  
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    BIOL& 170 Human Biology: Anatomy & Physiology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BIOL 118

    Course Description
    A comprehensive study of the human body, its structure, and its function. A non-lab course appropriate for non-science majors or for students beginning study in life sciences.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply correct anatomical terms to body regions and directional reference
    2. Describe, recognize, label or diagram the arrangement of the atom with its subatomic particles
    3. Explain the connection of chemical properties resulting from bonding to behavior of molecules in cellular systems in terms of ions, polarity and solubility
    4. Describe the significance of pH to enzymes and other proteins
    5. Recognize and describe general characteristics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and describe food sources of these macromolecules
    6. Recognize and describe nucleic acids and ATP
    7. List, describe, diagram and/or locate organelles and other cytoplasmic inclusions of importance to human cells, and their function.
    8. Describe cellular transport mechanisms
    9. List, describe, and recognize the major function of and criteria for the classification of the four basic tissue types: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous
    10. Label, list, describe or recognize the various layers of the skin and discuss their homeostatic interaction with each other and other body systems
    11. Identify the major components of the skeletal system and describe the interaction of these components with other body systems
    12. Label, list or identify the major bones of the skeleton
    13. Explain joint function and basic joint movements
    14. Compare the types of muscle tissue by gross and microscopic structure, location, and function
    15. Describe the physiology of contraction of skeletal muscle briefly and how it integrates with other body systems
    16. Label, list or identify the major muscles of the human musculature system
    17. Identify, describe and summarize the major components of the nervous system and describe the interaction of these components with other body systems
    18. Diagram and describe the process of neural transmission
    19. Describe the physiology and related anatomy of the senses of taste, smell, balance, vision, and hearing
    20. Label the endocrine organs; describe the principal mechanisms the endocrine system uses to maintain homeostasis with regard to growth, reproduction and metabolism, blood mineral and glucose levels, and water levels
    21. Name, summarize, describe the function and differentiate the cellular and non-cellular components of blood
    22. Describe heart structure and function including pumping mechanism and blood pathway
    23. Compare and contrast artery, vein and capillary anatomy and physiology with reference to function, pulse, cardiovascular disease and major organ supply and drainage
    24. Summarize components and function of the lymphatic system, emphasizing its relationship to immunity, and circulatory function
    25. Label, describe, and contrast the various organs of the respiratory, digestive, reproductive and urinary systems with regard to function, structure and effect on other systems
    26. Explain the importance of fluid, electrolytes, and pH balance to maintaining homeostasis with the systems and the body as a whole
  
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    BIOL& 175 Human Biology w/Lab: Anatomy & Physiology (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BIOL 120

    Course Description
    A comprehensive study of the human body, its structure and its function.  A laboratory course appropriate for non-science majors or for students beginning study in life sciences.

    Student Outcomes
    LECTURE OUTCOMES

    1. Apply correct anatomical terms for body regions and directional reference
    2. Describe, recognize, label or diagram the arrangement of the atom with its subatomic particles
    3. Explain the connection of chemical properties resulting from bonding to behavior of molecules in cellular systems in terms of ions, polarity and solubility
    4. Describe the significance of pH to enzymes and other proteins
    5. Describe general characteristics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and describe food sources of these macromolecules
    6. Describe the function of nucleic acids and ATP
    7. List, describe, diagram and/or locate organelles and other cytoplasmic inclusions of importance to human cells, and their functions
    8. Describe cellular transport mechanisms
    9. List, describe, and recognize the major function of and criteria for the classification of the four basic tissue types: epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous, and give a few prominent examples of sub-types of each
    10. Label, list, describe or recognize the various layers of the skin and discuss their homeostatic interaction with each other and other body systems
    11. Identify the major components of the skeletal system and describe the interaction of these components to the other body systems
    12. Compare the types of muscle tissue by gross and microscopic structure, location, and function
    13. Describe the physiology of contraction of skeletal muscle briefly and how it integrates with other body systems
    14. label, list or identify the major muscles of the body
    15. Identify, describe and summarize the major components of the nervous system and describe the interaction of these components with other body systems
    16. Diagram and describe the process of neural transmission
    17. Describe the physiology and related anatomy of the senses of taste, smell, balance, vision, and hearing
    18. Label the endocrine organs; describe the principal mechanisms the endocrine system uses to maintain homeostasis with regard to growth, reproduction and metabolism, blood mineral and glucose levels, and water levels
    19. Name, summarize, determine function and differentiate the cellular and non-cellular components of blood
    20. Identify and describe heart structures and their functions, including pumping mechanism and blood pathway
    21. Compare and contrast artery, vein and capillary anatomy and physiology with reference to pulse, cardiovascular disease and major organ supply and drainage
    22. Summarize components and function of the lymphatic system emphasizing its relationship to immunity, circulatory function, digestive, and endocrine systems of the body
    23. Label, describe, and contrast the various organs of the respiratory, digestive, reproductive and urinary systems with regard to functions, structures and effects on other systems
    24. Explain the importance of fluid, electrolytes, and pH balance to maintaining homeostasis with the systems and the body as a whole

    LAB OUTCOMES

    1. Examine the effects of concentration and particle size differences on diffusion of substances
    2. Identify the cell membrane as a semi-permeable membrane and discuss the significance of this quality
    3. Distinguish between simple diffusion, osmosis, and active transport
    4. Identify designated tissues from prepared slides, micrographs and/or drawings
    5. Identify skin layers and components on models or other representations
    6. Identify assigned bones and bony landmarks
    7. Identify, demonstrate and describe the types of movements at synovial joints of the body
    8. Identify assigned skeletal muscles on models, images or human bodies, and describe their actions
    9. Identify assigned regions of the brain on models or mammal brain specimen, correlating basic functions with anatomical structures
    10. Identify assigned features of ear and eye in dissections or models, correlating basic functions with anatomical features
    11. Identify regions of the heart and describe the flow of blood through it
    12. Demonstrate an understanding of commonly palpated pulse points and the mechanics of blood pressure testing
    13. Distinguish between cellular components of blood on microscopic examination or micrograph
    14. Identify assigned features of the respiratory system on models. Explain the pressure and volume relationships involved in breathing
    15. Describe the processes of digestion as distinct for carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Identify on models the locations of structures involved in the digestive processes
    16. Identify on models the structures involved in urine formation and correlate functions with anatomical features
    17. Identify on models the structures involved in reproduction and correlate functions with anatomical features
  
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    BIOL& 211 Majors Cellular (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite BIOL& 160  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required; CHEM& 139  OR CHEM& 121  with a minimum grade of 2.0; and ENGL& 101  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Structure and function of living cells including metabolism, genetics, differentiation, and microevolution. For science majors. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe basic chemical principles and employ those principles to the study of cellular biology.
    2. Describe the structure of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids and explain how those structures relate to their roles/function in cells.
    3. Evaluate the three-dimensional changes which would occur when certain amino acids are exchanged in a protein.
    4. Describe, compare and contrast the different organelles and inclusions and their functions in cells.
    5. Compare prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular characteristics.
    6. Evaluate how transport mechanisms are critical for normal cell function.
    7. Explain how the laws of thermodynamics apply to cellular activities.
    9. Describe in terms of REDOX reactions and energetics the metabolic processes of cellular respiration, fermentation and photosynthesis.
    10. Describe the metabolic processes of cellular respiration, fermentation and photosynthesis.
    11. Compare and contrast cellular respiration and photosynthesis.
    12. Illustrate the mechanisms used by plants to prevent water loss when collecting carbon dioxide.
    13. Summarize the need for the various pigments found in plants.
    14. Explain the parts of the cell cycle and how it is regulated.
    15. Compare and contrast cellular replication in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
    16. Compare and contrast the two forms of nuclear division, mitosis and meiosis.
    17. Explain the mechanisms contributing to genetic diversity.
    18. Reconstruct the events of protein synthesis from nucleic acid to functional protein in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
    19. Predict the effects of changes in DNA on transcription / translation and on cellular and organism development.
    20. Evaluate the use of current and possible future biotechnologies.
    21. Describe the processes of cell differentiation and development.
    22. Describe current theories of cell evolution.
    23. Distinguish viruses from cells.
    24. Describe the reproductive processes of one or more viruses.
    25. Design, implement, critique, and formally write-up experiment(s) using the scientific method.
  
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    BIOL& 212 Majors Animal (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite BIOL& 160  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required; CHEM& 139  OR CHEM& 121  with a minimum grade of 2.0; and ENGL& 101  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Examination and comparisons of the major animal taxa with emphasis on development, physiology, anatomy, taxonomy, adaptations, and behavior. Examination and evidence for evolution. Laboratory and/or field excursions included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and compare the characterizing features of each major phylum, order and class in Kingdom Animalia.
    2. Recognize, identify by common and scientific name, and classify animal specimens to phyla, class and order (based on currently accepted taxonomic means).
    3. Compare and contrast modern systematic methods of classification.
    4. Demonstrate, in lab and lecture, animal specimen adaptations at the macro- and microscopic levels to survive in a particular niche or habitat. Adaptation systems studied will include nervous, motor (muscle), skeletal, integumentary, respiratory, digestive, excretory, circulatory, endocrine and reproductive systems.
    5. State the evidence that supports the theory of evolution through classic and modern approaches.
    6. Describe the mechanisms that lead to speciation or extinction including the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.
    7. Identify the adaptive advantages of sexual selection, altruism, and kinship selection.
    8. Recognize and identify commonly associated protists, cells, tissues, organs, and organisms from microscopic study of specimens through lab and lecture study.
    9. Describe and compare the embryonic development of members of the major animal phyla, recognizing the different embryonic stages and processes of development in various taxonomic groups.
    10. Describe the synapomorphies and differences between the animal phyla (with convergent and divergent evolution applications considered).
    11. Compare classic approaches to the study of animal diversity through dissection and the study of natural history in relation to the animal’s environmental stresses, ecology and reproductive success.
    12. Demonstrate correct practice in a laboratory environment through the study of specimens, imagery and/or literary descriptions of animals that will include the preparation of organisms for dissection or on a microscope slide (light microscope and dissecting scope) for the study and recording of lab information.
    13. Describe and compare the characterizing features of each major phylum, order and class in Kingdom Animalia through lecture discussion, text/journal materials, laboratory dissection, biotechnological approaches, physical examination and identification.
  
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    BIOL& 213 Majors Plant (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite BIOL& 160  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required; CHEM& 139  OR CHEM& 121  with a minimum grade of 2.0; and ENGL& 101  with a minimum grade of 2.0 is required, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Examination and comparison of the major non-animal eukaryotic kingdoms and divisions with emphasis on development, physiology, anatomy, taxonomy, plant evolution and adaptations. Introduction to ecosystems, population and community ecology. Laboratory included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and record observations of gross and microscopic features of algae, fungi, mosses, ferns and seed plants through preparation and examination of microscope slide specimens from local collections.
    2. Identify evolutionary relationships and describe ecological roles among organisms belonging to the Domains.
    3. Describe the reproductive life cycle of algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms.
    4. Explain the current understanding for the domination of seed plants and flowering plants in most terrestrial ecosystems.
    5. Recognize fruits as defined in botanical terms and evaluate what type of flower or flowers, and other plant parts resulting in that fruit.
    6. Describe plant cells and their organelles and contrast with animals cells.
    7. Describe and compare the external structure, tissue type and arrangement of tissues and cells in roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants to identify of roots, stems and leaves and to correctly associate them with ferns, conifers or angiosperms.
    8. Describe the cellular processes that generate longitudinal growth of stems and radial growth of perennial woody plants.
    9. Distinguish accurately between monocot and eudicot angiosperms based on external structures and tissue arrangement in roots, leaves and stems.
    10. Define various factors that influence plant growth such as the origin, timing, circulation and effects of plant hormones on plant growth, form and behavior.
    11. Design, perform and interpret the results of an experiment that pertains to plant function, development or growth.
    12. Describe the mechanisms used to explain water lifting against gravity and identify adaptations plants utilize to control water loss and factors affecting transpiration.
    13. Describe the movement of solutions in the phloem and explain resource allocation within a plant.
    14. Relate physical and chemical parameters of soil including accessibility of minerals to plant growth and nutrition.
    15. Explain the interactions between plants, fungi and nitrogen fixing bacteria in regards to individual plants and ecosystems. Describe the consequences of the loss of these interactions.
    16. Explain the effect of the rates of survivorship, age distributions, and reproductive strategies have on populations and population growth rates.
    17. Explain how rates of survivorship, age distributions, reproductive strategies and carrying capacity, influence strategies to manage population of various species.
    18. Describe the possible interactions between various living organisms, such as predator-prey, competition, mutualism, etc. Design experiments that can distinguish between these interactions.
    19. Describe gross and net productivity in terms of photosynthesis and respiration.
    20. Describe trophic levels and its effects on populations of top carnivores and bioaccumulation.
    21. Describe the carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and phosphorous biogeochemical cycles. Describe how humans have altered these cycles and the consequences.
    22. Explain the concept of resource limitation and subsequent effects on both primary production and ecosystem productivity.
    23. Assess the impact of endemic, introduced and native flora.
    24. Identify by common name 20 local species of plants.
  
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    BIOL& 241 Human A & P 1 (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite BIOL& 160  with a grade of 2.0 or better and CHEM& 100  with a 2.0 or better; or KINS 155  with a 2.0 or better; or EMS 160  with a 2.0 or better; or instructor permission

    Course Description
    First course of a two-quarter study of body structure and related physiology of cellular through system levels. Lecture includes an in-depth study of a) cells and tissues and b) integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Lab includes in-depth study of a) cell physiology, b) microscopy, c) histology, d) human bone and bone marking identification, e) human musculature, and f) nervous and sensory function tests using slides, models and/or representative mammalian specimens.

    Student Outcomes
    LECTURE OUTCOMES
    1. Distinguish between the terms “anatomy” and “physiology”
    2. Use correct and appropriate anatomical and directional terminology and descriptions
    3. Explain the basic concept of homeostasis and how homeostatic mechanisms (positive and negative feedback control) apply to body systems
    4. Describe the formation of ionic, covalent and hydrogen bonds and how they relate to human physiology
    5. Explain the role of catabolic and anabolic reactions involving carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and ATP in the human body
    6. Identify major events in the life cycle of a cell
    7. Identify major cellular structures and explain their functions
    8. Identify and describe the four basic tissues of the body, and subtypes of each, and explain their functions
    9. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the integumentary system and explain their functions and the functions of the system
    10. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the skeletal system and explain their functional roles in: osteogenesis, repair body support, protection and movement mineral and energy storage and hematopoiesis
    11. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the muscular system, and explain their functional roles in body movement, maintenance of posture and heat production
    12. Explain in detail the microscopic and molecular anatomy of skeletal muscle and the physiology of its contraction. Compare the anatomy and physiology of skeletal, smooth and cardiac muscle
    13. Distinguish between energy utilization pathways in fast, slow, and intermediate fiber types
    14. Use appropriate nomenclature in describing the ultrastructure and physiology of skeletal muscle
    15. Distinguish between the two main structural divisions of the nervous system (CNS and PNS) and its two main functional divisions (SNS and ANS). Identify functions of designated regions of the brain
    16. Identify and describe the major components of the autonomic nervous system with emphasis on structural and physiological differences between sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions; trace a typical reflex arc
    17. Describe neurophysiology, including the mechanism of resting membrane potential, initiation and propagation of action potentials and impulse transmission across a synapse
    18. Name and describe functions of the cranial and spinal nerves, plexuses, meninges, CSF and tract pathways.
    19. Describe the classification of receptors and their roles
    20. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the eye and ear and explain their functional roles in vision, hearing and equilibrium
    21. Identify and locate the receptors responsible for olfaction and gustation and describe the physiology of smell and taste
    22. Integrate the entire set of systems studied to-date



    LABORATORY OUTCOMES
    1. Review basic microscopy techniques including focusing, illumination, contrast, measuring and reviewing parts of the microscope and other microscopy terminology
    2. Predict the effect of concentration differences on movement through semi-permeable membranes
    3. Draw and label the characteristics of the following epithelial tissues: simple squamous, simple cuboidal, simple columnar, non-keratinized stratified squamous, keratinized stratified squamous, pseudostratified ciliated columnar and transitional
    4. Draw and label the characteristic cell types and features of the following connective tissues: areolar, reticular, elastic, dense irregular, dense regular, adipose, hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, fibrocartilage and osseus (bone). Highlight the structural units (i.e. osteon) and all associated coverings where appropriate (i.e. perichondrium, periosteum)
    5. Draw and label the characteristic features of cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle tissues including the fascia associated with muscle tissue organization
    6. Draw and label the characteristic features of a giant multipolar neuron and associated neuroglia
    7. Identify designated bones and landmarks in the human skeleton
    8. Identify designated skeletal muscles and describe their function.”
    9. Describe and identify designated CNS structures, blood supply to the brain (cerebral arterial circle) and cranial nerves using an animal brain and/or a model of a human brain
    10. Describe and demonstrate special sense physiology tests such as visual acuity, “blind spot”, nystagmus, hearing, equilibrium, olfaction, taste and cutaneous sensation
    11. Identify on models and/or with a mammal’s eye the three tunics and their respective structures and describe the function of each structure
    12. Identify on models the three regions of the human ear and their respective structures and describe the function of each structure
  
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    BIOL& 242 Human A & P 2 (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Completion of BIOL& 241  with 2.0 or better or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Second course of a two-quarter study of body structure and related physiology on cellular through system levels. Lecture includes an in-depth study of body organization, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic and immunology, respiratory, digestive and metabolism, excretory, and reproductive systems. Lab includes endocrine histology, cardiovascular system of humans, hematology, urinalysis, immunology, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive systems using microscopic examination, models and/or representative mammalian specimens.

    Student Outcomes
    LECTURE OUTCOMES
    1. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the endocrine system contrasting the functional roles of their hormones in communication, regulation and integration
    2. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the cardiovascular system and explain their functional roles in transport, hemodynamics and blood pressure
    3. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the lymphatic system and explain their functional roles in fluid dynamics and immunity
    4. Describe the physiology of innate and adaptive immunity
    5. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the respiratory system and explain their functional roles in pulmonary ventilation (breathing) and in the processes of external and internal respiration
    6. Describe mechanisms of gas exchange in the lungs and tissues as well as gas transport in the blood
    7. Identify and describe variables impacting the transport of oxygen on hemoglobin
    8. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the digestive system and explain their functional roles in mechanical and chemical digestive processes, absorption, transportation, elimination, regulation of the digestive processes and nutrition
    9. Summarize reactants and products (especially energy yield) of cellular respiration and indicate how carbohydrates, amino acids and triglycerides are biochemically interconvertible and used for energy
    10. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the urinary system and explain their functional roles in urine formation and blood pressure management
    11. Describe the homeostatic mechanisms that control fluid/electrolyte and acid/base balance
    12. Explain the regulation of volume, composition and distribution of body fluids
    13. Explain the balancing of pH of body fluids
    14. Identify and describe the major gross and microscopic anatomical components of the male and female reproductive systems and explain their functional roles in reproduction. Discuss gamete production, including distinctions between mitosis and meiosis and principles of inheritance. Describe hormonal controls of ovarian cycling
    15. Describe major events of fetal development and the impact of pregnancy on maternal physiology

    LABORATORY OUTCOMES
    1. Identify the gross and microscopic anatomy of the major endocrine organs
    2. Identify the components of whole blood via microscopic examination, describe the functional roles of the formed elements of blood, and discuss blood values and counts, specifically: hematocrit, hemoglobin, RBC count, WBC differential count, platelet count and interpretation of abnormal values
    3. Identify the ABO blood type and Rh factor from an agglutination test
    4. Identify superficial and deep structures of the heart, including the conduction system, on various heart models, diagrams, and by mammal heart dissection
    5. Describe and demonstrate patterns of blood circulation throughout the human body, including systemic, pulmonary, cerebral, coronary, hepatic portal, and fetal circulations on models, diagrams and/or dissected mammal specimens
    6. Measure blood pressure and discuss its functional interrelationships with pulse pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, peripheral resistance and hemodynamics
    7. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of the lymphatic system. Discuss the pattern of lymph circulation and both its encapsulated and non-encapsulated structures
    8. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of the respiratory system and related structures
    9. Measure pulmonary air volumes and capacities using a spirometer
    10. Assess problems dealing with metabolic/respiratory acidosis and alkalosis
    11. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of the GI tract and the accessory organs of digestion
    12. Discuss and model the catabolism and anabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids
    13. Identify and describe the gross and microscopic anatomy of the urinary system
    14. Assess results of a urinalysis, including gross examination, specific gravity, biochemical analysis, and microscopic examination
    15. Identify and describe gross and microscopic anatomy of the male and female reproductive tracts and external genitalia, including reproductive cell development (meiosis, gametogenesis, folliculogenesis)
 

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