2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Sep 26, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Prefixes


COURSE PREFIXES

PREFIX DEPARTMENT
ACCT ACCOUNTING
ASL AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
ANTH ANTHROPOLOGY
ART ART
ASTR ASTRONOMY
ATMOS ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
BIOL BIOLOGY
BUS BUSINESS
BTECA/BTECM BUSINESS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
MNGT BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
CHEM CHEMISTRY
COLLG COLLEGE SUCCESS
CMST COMMUNICATION STUDIES
CIS COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CNE COMPUTER NETWORK ENGINEERING
CONST CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
CJ CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CS COMPUTER SCIENCE
DHYG DENTAL HYGIENE
DDSGN DIGITAL DESIGN
DRMA DRAMA
ECED EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECON ECONOMICS
EDUC EDUCATION
EMT EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
ENGR ENGINEERING
ENGL ENGLISH
ENVS ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
FASH FASHION MERCHANDISING
FCA FIRE COMMAND
FRCH FRENCH
GEOG GEOGRAPHY
GEOL GEOLOGY
GERM GERMAN
HIST HISTORY
HSEM HOMELAND SECURITY
HSCI HEALTH SCIENCES
HSSA HUMAN SERVICES SUBSTANCE ABUSE
HUM HUMANITIES
INFO INFORMATION STUDIES
INTS INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
ISS INTEGRATED SOCIAL SCIENCE
JAPN JAPANESE
JOURN JOURNALISM
KINS KINESIOLOGY
KREA KOREAN
MATH MATHEMATICS
MUSC MUSIC
NSCI NATURAL SCIENCE
NURS NURSING
NAC NURSING ASSISTANT CERTIFIED
NUTR NUTRITION
OSH OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
OCEA OCEANOGRAPHY
PHIL PHILOSOPHY
PE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PS PHYSICAL SCIENCE
PHYS PHYSICS
POLS POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSYC PSYCHOLOGY
READ READING
RUSS RUSSIAN
SSMH SOCIAL SERVICE MENTAL HEALTH
SOC SOCIOLOGY
SPAN SPANISH
VT VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

 

 
  
  •  

    HSEM 235 Homeland Security Law and Ethics (3 credits)



    Prerequisite HSEM 102  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    This course is designed to give the student an overview of various statutes, regulations, constitutional law, and common law associated with Homeland Security. This course examines emergency response, weapons of mass destruction, local government powers, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, civil rights, international anti-terrorism efforts, Homeland Security Act of 2002, and the Patriot Act. Students will be introduced to the legalities and ethics relevant to organizing for counterterrorism, investigating terrorism and other national security threats, crisis and consequence management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a working understanding of key legal and policy principles related to emergency management.
    2. Analyze FEMA’s role in policy, law and management.
    3. Examine local, state, and federal relationships when it comes to introducing and implementing new laws and regulations.
    4. Recognize the critical role of court decisions in clarifying the practical application of legislation and executive directives.
    5. Analyze privacy concerns and constitutional protections regarding governmental information-gathering related to emergency management.
    6. Examine important statutes and policies enacted post 9-11and their impact on emergency management.
    7. Differentiate between crisis management and consequence management policy and its evolution in response to events.
  
  •  

    HSEM 240 Homeland Security Emergency Management Work-Based Learning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite HSEM 102  with at least a 2.0 grade. Requires HSEM program coordinator approval.

    Course Description
    Provides students “real world experiences” in homeland security and emergency management. Students learn to work within time constraints and are exposed to appropriate workplace behaviors. Students will have opportunities to refine the core skills they have learned from the courses or curriculum.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the Work-based Learning (WBL) site as a whole, including its history and culture.
    2. interacts with other organizations and the community it serves.
    3. Collaborate at regular intervals with the WBL site agency supervisor to further develop skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.
    4. Perform expected duties of the WBL site as outlined in expectations provided by your supervisor.
    5. Identify emergency management techniques used from your WBL.
    6. Examine the emergency management duties and responsibilities of your WBL site.
    7. Analyze various types of exercises used by this organization and their specific purposes and objectives.
    8. the mission of your WBL through personal and professional actions.
    9. Effectively work with internal and external customers.
    10. Relate prior academic theory to current work experience.
    11. Working with your WBL supervisor and instructor, design and implement a feasible project plan.
    12. Identify specific skills and knowledge required by working emergency managers.
    13. Produce a project report.
  
  •  

    HSEM 250 Homeland Security Law and Ethics (3 credits)



    Prerequisite HSEM 102  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    This course is designed to give the student an overview of various statutes, regulations, constitutional law, and common law associated with Homeland Security. This course examines emergency response, weapons of mass destruction, local government powers, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Homeland Security, civil rights, international anti-terrorism efforts, Homeland Security Act of 2002, and the Patriot Act. Students will be introduced to the legalities and ethics relevant to organizing for counterterrorism, investigating terrorism and other national security threats, crisis and consequence management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a working understanding of key legal and policy principles related to emergency management.
    2. Analyze FEMA’s role in policy, law and management.
    3. Examine local, state, and federal relationships when it comes to introducing and implementing new laws and regulations.
    4. Recognize the critical role of court decisions in clarifying the practical application of legislation and executive directives.
    5. Analyze privacy concerns and constitutional protections regarding governmental information-gathering related to emergency management.
    6. Examine important statutes and policies enacted post 9-11and their impact on emergency management.
    7. Differentiate between crisis management and consequence management policy and its evolution in response to events.
  
  •  

    HSEM 330 Risk Assessment for HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course develops foundational skills to identify, analyze, and evaluate risk in an organization within the context of all-hazards emergency management.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Analyze and differentiate between the public and private roles and responsibilities for risk management.
    1.1 Assess supply chain and vendor vulnerability and security risks.

    2.0 Define and differentiate threats and hazards related to public and private organizations.
    2.1 Articulate the impact of threats and hazards on the risk assessment and mitigation process.

    3.0 Develop a hazard analysis and vulnerability assessment of existing private and public organizations using a standard risk assessment process appropriate for the selected organization.
    3.1 Conduct a gap analysis of plans and response systems.
    3.2 Identify and prioritize potential business impacts of an event within the framework of the Business Impact Analysis planning lifecycle.

    4.0 Compare and contrast the terms threat, vulnerability, likelihood, and consequence.
    4.1 Articulate the probability of occurrence and impacts on the organization.

    5.0 Demonstrate the role of risk mitigation using examples of risk reduction strategies.

    6.0 Analyze the risk and nature of threats to the nation’s critical and information management infrastructure.

    7.0 Compare and contrast the roles and responsibilities of public and private organizations involved in hazard vulnerability, risk identification, risk assessments, and risk mitigation.

    8.0 Develop agency and organization specific tools to evaluate domestic security challenges facing the United States and other industrialized nations.
    8.1 Identify best practices to benchmark programs and plans.
    8.2 Identify critical operations as part of a comprehensive risk analysis case study.
    8.3 Order and map the required practices to coordinate all resources for preparing, responding, and recovering from an incident.
    8.4 Order and map standard activities for incident preparedness, response and recovery.
  
  •  

    HSEM 340 Effective Organizational Com. and Public Speaking (4 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course analyzes personal and group dynamics in emergency management including public speaking emphasizing speech, organization and audience analysis in the Homeland Security Emergency Management environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Identify and explain the three goals of risk communication.
    1.1 Develop risk communication plans targeted to the needs of constituencies and concerned parties.

    2.0 Research a Homeland Security Emergency Management issue using multiple information sources and present the results using computer-generated visual aids.

    3.0 Evaluate personal perceptions and biases that are barriers to communication in a high stress emergency environment.
    3.1 Apply knowledge of the use of persuasive strategies in an oral presentation.

    4.0 Differentiate between emergency, crisis, and risk communication.
    4.1 Differentiate pre-crisis, crisis, and post-crisis communication principles.

    5.0 Demonstrate facilitation skills and practices to support project management and other planning activities.
  
  •  

    HSEM 357 External Affairs for Emergency Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of how to lead a Homeland Security Emergency Management organization’s external affairs program.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Describe the pre- and post-disaster communication requirements of emergency management of agencies and organizations.
    1.1 Identify and describe the steps involved in planning and conducting public disaster preparedness campaign.
    1.2 Demonstrate how public information officers direct accurate and timely life safety information to the general public and survivors during and after a disaster.

    2.0 Develop communications policies, procedures, and protocols to allow seamless communication from risk prevention to incident response through to the recovery phase.

    3.0 Describe the purpose and structure of Emergency Support Function #15 Standard Operating Procedures and the relationship to External Affairs and the National Response Plan.

    4.0 Demonstrate how to effectively communicate public information within a variety of media environments and stakeholder groups.

    5.0 Develop an immediate response communication plan that addresses either a terrorist event or a natural disaster.

    6.0 Develop an awareness of special populations and their specific needs during a major emergency incident.
    6.1 Compare and contrast the specific needs of the vulnerable groups and populations.
  
  •  

    HSEM 360 Leadership in HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to leadership and organizational theory emphasizing principles and techniques of leadership and supervision including meta-leadership.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Describe basic leadership styles and the effective use of each style given individual capabilities and situations.
    1.1 Develop and articulate one’s own philosophy of leadership.
    1.2 Identify how leadership styles may be affected by crisis and non-crisis situations.

    2.0 Compare and contrast motivation theories and describe how apply leadership theories to motivate self and others.
    2.1 Describe the role of situational leadership in motivating emergency management personnel.

    3.0 Identify and assess complex relationships among and between organizations with competing interests.
    3.1 Describe the impact of mutually interdependent activities on the development of policy, strategic planning, fiscal management, and dispute resolution.
    3.2 Engage in group processes that apply strategic planning principles to real world scenarios.

    4.0 Describe a change management model using data sets and metrics that support the process for planning, communicating, and implementing change.
    4.1 Demonstrate a range of skills addressing conflict management, use of power, group dynamics, leadership and influence.
    4.2 Describe causes of team dysfunction and develop a plan to mitigate team dysfunction in the workplace.

    5.0 Review and discuss various decision-making models and articulate the implications of these models for emergency management.

    6.0 Demonstrate how effective leadership impacts an organizations ability to coordinate across jurisdictions, agencies, public, non-profit, and private sectors to enhance the ability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards using the Whole Community approach.
  
  •  

    HSEM 365 Systems Thinking and Individual Leadership (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course distinguishes traditional forms of analysis from the dynamics of systems thinking processes in a context of emergency and risk management.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Describe the evolution of systems thinking and the value of understanding oneself and others as components of effective leadership.
    1.1 Apply systems theory and logic models to define integrated outcomes, risk, and performance measures in multi-organizational settings

    2.0 Discuss and describe the importance of creating a shared vision across internal and external and partnerships.

    3.0 Research and analyze the evolution of existing homeland security/emergency management systems, safety systems, structures, and functionalities, including local, state, federal, volunteer, and private organizations.

    4.0 Apply effective interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and decision-making skills commensurate with a defined level of responsibility.
    4.1 Explain how the framework of systems thinking impacts the critical decision making process.
    4.2 Demonstrate how actions affect the whole environment (organizational or environmental) and analyze impacts and outcomes marked by complexity and great numbers of interactions.

    5.0 Demonstrate ways to manage a scalable workforce that include both paid staff and volunteer staff to accomplish preparedness, mitigation, response and recovery tasks.
  
  •  

    HSEM 370 Continuity Planning for Business and Government (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an overview of the Business Continuity Planning (BCP) process for private sector organizations, and Continuity of Operations Planning (COOP) and Continuity of Government (COG) processes for operations focused on strategies to min

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Assess the private sector’s impact on the protection of the nation’s critical infrastructure including economic recovery and cybersecurity using case studies of recent events.

    2.0 Evaluate relevant industry standards along with federal FEMA standards to assess and interpret risk factors, hazards, and critical information as part of a Business Impact Analysis.

    3.0 Design a Planning Team template identifying the selection, roles, and responsibilities of those who would collaborate through the Business Continuity Planning process.

    4.0 Explain the role and use of recovery strategies as a means to restore business operations to a minimum acceptable level following a business disruption. Include a description of the recovery time objectives developed during the business impact analysis.

    5.0 Identify the four steps for developing a Business Continuity Plan (BCP).
    5.1 Develop a Business Continuity Plan for a specified organization using basic business and project management principles to allow for quick, ethical, and effective response to rapidly evolving situations.
    5.2 Identify time-sensitive or critical functions and process and the resources that support the BCP.

    6.0 Develop a recommended training plan for a business continuity team that includes testing and exercise recommendations that evaluate recovery strategies and the plan.

    7.0 Formulate a strategic plan that demonstrates the use of Business Continuity principles, processes, procedures, and activities to increase disaster resilience in private sector organizations.

    7.1 Formulate a strategic plan that demonstrates the use of Continuity of Government principles, processes, procedures, and activities to increase disaster resilience in public sector organizations.
  
  •  

    HSEM 380 Risk Reduction for HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to the development of risk reduction strategies, business plans and budgets to support implementation.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Compare and contrast risk assessment and analysis theories.

    2.0 Research and analyze the nation’s private sector strategies for critical infrastructure protection and securing cyberspace.

    3.0 Analyze the key steps and actions that can be taken to manage risk including the study and understanding of the community or entity at risk.

    4.0 Analyze case studies and evaluate the application of risk reduction strategies.
    4.1 Describe lessons learned and best practices.
    4.2 Develop risk reduction strategies based utilizing standard industry mitigation processes.


    5.0 Identify critical operations and interpret risk factors and strategies as part of a comprehensive risk analysis for deployments for all hazards.
    5.1 Develop a gap analysis that includes critical operations, creating business or action plans, and a budget to support the implementation of the strategies.

    6.0 Assess and interpret risk factors and strategies for deployment of resources for all hazards emergencies.
  
  •  

    HSEM 410 Ethics and Critical Thinking in HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an analysis of ethical issues in Homeland Security Emergency Management.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Explain the impact of diverse cultures on Homeland Security Emergency Management decision making.
    1.1 Identify strategies for reducing impacts on diverse cultures and assuring that there is an inclusive and “whole community” consideration for all decisions and planning functions.

    2.0 Evaluate and explain the tension between civil liberties and national security.
    2.1 Compare and contrast the necessity to maintain civil liberties while acting for the security and safety of the greater good.

    3.0 Analyze major legal and ethical principles that underlie emergency policy and operations.
    3.1 Demonstrate how these principles impact emergency management and homeland security.
    3.2 Articulate an ethical course of action for a specific decision-maker and defend that recommendation using ethical principles and values.

    4.0 Discuss how due process, equal protection, sovereign immunity, and state’s rights all factor into emergency management.
    4.1 Examine the consequences that can occur when individual rights are compromised during an emergency management event.

    5.0 Analyze case studies to identify and explain ethical dilemmas, as well as all entities that have ethical claims or interests in the dilemma (e.g., protecting human subjects, humane treatment of animals) or in professional practice.

    6.0 Model and apply ethical leadership, management, knowledge, and effective critical decision-making principles through case studies of real world events.

    7.0 Summarize the importance of leaders and decision makers acting ethically, particularly those dealing with the public during times of crisis.

    8.0 Examine the degree of ethical duty owed to a community during planning for catastrophe readiness and response by considering the needs of vulnerable populations.
  
  •  

    HSEM 420 Technology and Cybersecurity in HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course explores the applications and security of technology in Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Analyze the appropriate role of technology in the support of emergency planning, response, recovery and mitigation efforts.

    2.0 Identify the technology, specific functions, typical applications, and value of tools that can support command and general staff during emergency operations.
    2.1 Evaluate the value of Internet, telecommunications, and network applications in the context of emergency management to include Graphic Information Systems (GIS), Document Security Systems (DSS), Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS), and Enterprise Information Systems (EIS).
    2.2 Analyze and evaluate the potential impact of new technologies on emergency management.

    3.0 Analyze the use, effectiveness and application of Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System tools during recent events.

    4.0 Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of various emergency warning systems.

    5.0 Describe the various workforce specialty areas identified in the National Cybersecurity Workforce Framework.
    5.1 Create a correlation of the various specialties with the most current high-risk cybersecurity threats.

    6.0 Create a model information technology disaster recovery plan in conjunction with a Business Continuity Plan.
    6.1 Describe recovery strategies to restore hardware, applications and data within a timeframe to meet the needs of the business recovery.

    7.0 Identify Articulate the nation’s technology risks.
    7.1 Articulate private sector strategies for critical infrastructure protection and securing cyberspace.
  
  •  

    HSEM 430 Legal Issues in HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an overview in public policy and law related to public service and the Homeland Security Emergency Management field.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Describe the laws, authorities, and mandates of state and federal agencies involved in emergency management.
    1.1 Assess the role of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in disasters.

    2.0 Analyze the legal and policy principles applicable to current Homeland Security and Emergency Management issues through case studies of recent issues and events.

    3.0 Evaluate ethical and legal responses to recent emergencies and disasters utilizing interpretations of fundamental local, state, federal and international rules and regulations.

    4.0 Compare and contrast the evolution of crises and consequence management policies.
    4.1 Differentiate between crises and consequence management policies that have developed gradually and those that have developed rapidly in response to events.

    5.0 Analyze organizational changes, statutes, and policies enacted post-911 and post Katrina.
    5.1 Describe how these events have affected the Emergency Management field.

    6.0 Evaluate the critical role of recent court decisions and how they may have impacted the application of legislation and executive directives.
  
  •  

    HSEM 440 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for HSEM (3 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course provides an introduction to mapping tools and desktop applications for conducting emergency planning, data analysis, and resource management for emergency management.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Describe the role of Geographic Information Systems in supporting emergency management through each mission area and phase of the emergency management preparedness cycle.

    2.0 Understand the fundamental theory of Geographic Information science behind Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
    2.1 Compare and contrast the situations where GIS is best suited and those that are not appropriate applications of GIS technology.

    3.0 Evaluate the value of GIS analysis to address applied problems and/or research questions through comprehensive case studies.
    3.1 Review after action reports and assess the effectiveness of using information generated through a GIS analysis and how the data affected the overall outcome of the event.

    4.0 Prepare and present response plans for multiple types of emergencies and disasters.
    4.1 Demonstrate how response plans can be adapted quickly, ethically, and effectively to rapidly evolving situations.

    5.0 Describe the types of products commonly produced by the GIS Unit during an incident.
    5.1 Identify how particular GIS capabilities can be utilized for mission support.

    6.0 Identify and disseminate best practices for establishing and maintaining data flow, creating products, and meeting timelines during an incident.

    7.0 Describe situations where it is appropriate to use remote sensing products.
    7.1 Describe how remote sensing can enhance situational awareness and provide a foundation for assuring a common operating picture.
  
  •  

    HSEM 449 Professional Development Seminar (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This course prepares the student for the Homeland Security and Emergency Management Workbased Learning experience. This includes the culmination of an ongoing and dynamic process to develop an individual professional portfolio documenting essential a

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Develop a Professional Portfolio exhibiting professional development efforts, progress, and achievements.
    2.0 Develop model resumes, applications, cover letters, and references for various government and private sector positions.
    2.1 Complete a full application process for HSEM related positions.
    2.2 Evaluate various workplace policies and demonstrate how they affect performance in various HSEM high stress environments.
    2.3 Demonstrate the ability to solve complex interpersonal workplace problems.
    2.4 Develop and action plan for personal and professional growth.
    3.0 Establish a HSEM Workbased Learning internship experience starting the following academic quarter.
  
  •  

    HSEM 450 Workbased Learning for HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    The Homeland Security Emergency Management Workbased Learning (WBL) experience provides students with “real world experiences”. The focus of the WBL is application and an opportunity to refine and apply core skills, with a specific emphasis on Leader

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Working with your Workbased Learning (WBL) supervisor and HSEM instructor, design and implement a feasible project plan.
    1.1 Identify a specific and measurable deliverable, service, or work product.

    2.0 Working with the WBL supervisor and HSEM instructor identify at least three learning objectives.
    2.1 Articulate how these objectives will be accomplished.

    3.0 Describe the WBL site including its history and culture.
    3.1 Describe how the organization interacts with other organizations and the community it serves.

    4.0 Create a Personal Improvement Plan and update the plan throughout the WBL project.
    4.1 Collaborate at regular intervals with the WBL site supervisor to seek opportunities to learn new skills, realign expectations and duties, or change responsibilities.

    5.0 Identify and evaluate the effectiveness of emergency management procedures used at your Workbased Learning site.

    6.0 Analyze various types of training and exercises used by the organization and their specific purposes and objectives.
    6.1 Apply solid foundation of knowledge and skills to assume leadership roles in emergency management, homeland security, and /or public policy

    7.0 Create a final Project Report that identifies how the learning objectives were met and the services provided, including a copy of all deliverables and work products.
  
  •  

    HSEM 460 Research Methods in HSEM (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    This is a comprehensive course covering major analytical and statistical tools used in Homeland Security Emergency Management program administration.

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Assess the value and impact of academic research to the practice of emergency management.

    2.0 Develop a plan for conducting a Homeland Security research project that will address a current issue or problem.
    2.1 Develop the elements of a research strategy for data evaluation and critical analysis.
    2.2 Communicate findings in a coherent, well-organized written work.

    3.0 Analyze three research papers and evaluate them for ethical considerations.
    3.1 Articulate the critical elements related to the integrity of the research and outcomes.

    4.0 Develop an evaluation tool or rubric to validate academic research that would be applicable to a Homeland Security topic or problem.
    4.1 Verify and validate the rubric by evaluating an applied research project.

    5.0 Compare and contrast various data collection methods, determining the strengths and limitations of each, and when to implement them.
    5.1 Describe the application of various research tools used to collect, analyze, and integrate information into a research project.
    5.2 Research and develop a written assessment of best practices in the emergency field.

    6.0 Apply the appropriate citation guidelines for a research project for the emergency management community.

    7.0 Develop a research project that will contribute to the practice of emergency management integrating research methodology, validated data and analysis, and standard business writing skills.
    7.1 Design and conduct a trend analysis.
    7.2 Using a case study, identify critical operations as a part of a comprehensive risk analysis.
  
  •  

    HSEM 470 HSEM Capstone Project (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Current enrollment in the Bachelor of Applied Science in Homeland Security Emergency Management program.

    Course Description
    The Capstone Project is a culminating academic and intellectual review demonstrating learning acquisition and practical application from all courses, theories, techniques, and practical application of content taught in the Bachelor of Applied Science

    Student Outcomes
    1.0 Design and conduct a tabletop exercise for a simulated group of participants using Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program methodology.
    1.1 Identify available resources (people, agencies, policies, materials, other governments)

    2.0 Assess the tabletop exercise and develop an After Action Report to include a performance evaluation, an effectiveness assessment, and recommendations for improvement.

    3.0 Design an incident action plan for an identified operational period using a currently active declared disaster. Explain the use of the “planning P” to develop an incident action plan.

    4.0 Evaluate three different Comprehensive Emergency Management Plans including one from a major private corporation and one from a government agency.
    4.1 Develop improvement recommendations for each.

    5.0 Compare and contrast the goals, scope, and services for three different currently active disaster declarations.
    5.1 Prepare a written report forecasting the progress of the event over the following 7 days.

    6.0 Using a currently active disaster declaration, prepare a 6 month recovery plan to restore the community and increase resilience.
    6.1 At a minimum the plan will address restoration, mitigation, and resilience.
  
  •  

    HSSA& 101 Introduction to Chemical Dependency (3 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled General Transfer Elective
    Formerly ALCDA 111-CCN

    Course Description
    An orientation to chemical dependency and psychoactive drug abuse, including etiological theories of chemical dependency; history of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs; and basic principles of prevention, intervention, and treatment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Examine obsessive compulsive addictions and describe how these cut across addictions in all the counseling fields.
    2. Explain and discuss the disease concept of alcoholism & drug addiction and opposing theories.
    3. Discuss the history of drugs and alcohol including social policies.
    4. Describe neuron action receptors and the neurotransmission process.
    5. List and describe the classifications of drugs and be able to recognize some signs and symptoms of these drugs.
    6. Describe the impact of drugs and alcohol use on the family and social systems.
    7. Describe and explain the concepts & effectiveness of 12-Step programs.
    8. Apply principles of intervention and treatment strategies in a simulated situation.
    9. Define and discuss dual diagnosis.
    10. Discuss the differences between shame and guilt and their respective impact upon chemically abusing individuals & those associated with them.
    11. Define and discuss terms and laws specific to the chemical dependency field.
  
  •  

    HUM 105 Black Thought and Culture (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 105

    Course Description
    Beginning with African traditions and closing with a look at contemporary issues, this course will examine the cultural heritage of African Americans in relation to their language, literature, fine arts, music, religion and philosophy.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Be open, receptive, critical and responsive to diverse cultural points of view.
    2. Recognize one’s bias
    3. Recognize the need to center and decenter one’s own perspective in order to understand multiple ways of knowing, being, and thinking.
    4. Recognize and evaluate how, identity, life experiences and values affect decisions and actions.
    5. Evaluate and be accountable for the impact actions have on self, community, and environments.
    6. Identify the connection between African traditions and that of Black music, art, religion, and language.
    7. Trace the development of Black music from Africa to present.
    8. Identify significant themes in African American poetry and relate them to past and current social issues.
    9. Compare and contrast the philosophies of major Black philosophers and their ideologies.
    10. Recognize significant contributions African Americans have made in the history of the U.S.
  
  •  

    HUM 106 Ethnic Thought and Culture (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 106

    Course Description
    Provides a multicultural studies approach to the diversity, complexity and contradictions of the American ethnic experience as expressed in the arts and humanities.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and discuss works of art or cultural expression as products of a particular culture or ethnic group.
    2. Appraise aesthetic elements of works of art, such as performing arts, language, visual imagery, literature.
    3. Discuss particular works of art in relation to historical, social, and economic factors surrounding their production.
    4. Analyze images, themes, and ideas found in various works in the arts.
    5. Examine stereotypes and their impact on identity and ethnic/racial representations.
    6. Discuss ethnic cultural expression as a tool for political and social justice movements.
    7. Identify the importance of language used to represent various ethnic groups.
    8. Examine central concepts in relation to aesthetic representation, such as objectivity, subjectivity, community, and cultural and multiracial identity.
  
  •  

    HUM 107 Latin American Thought and Culture (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 107

    Course Description
    Examines Latin America through the lens of the humanities. Students will explore the literature, film, music and art of Latin America and how it has been shaped by cultural and geographical diversity, domestic and international politics, religion, social structure, and economics. Team work and research skills will be developed.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify countries and geographic regions of Latin America in order to understand the regional similarities and differences in humanistic expression.
    2. Identify and analyze the impact of dictatorships, oligarchy and leftist revolutions on humanistic expression in Latin America.
    3. Identify and analyze the impact of indigenous, European, African and Asian cultures on humanistic expression in Latin America.
    4. Identify and analyze the religious influences and the role of religion in Latin America in terms of their impact on humanistic expression.
    5. Identify and analyze the balance of socio-economic classes in Latin America in terms of its impact on humanistic expression.
    6. Identify and analyze the impact of the role of the United States in Latin American politics, agriculture, and industry in terms of its impact on humanistic expression.
    7. Synthesize information from the above outcomes to analyze and appreciate Latin American cultural movements and genres, including the “Boom”, magical realism, Liberation Theology, Afro-Antillean poetry, the novel of the dictator, and the Nueva Trova.
  
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    HUM 109 American Thought and Culture: The Harlem Renaissance (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A study of the Black American cultural movement of the late 1920’s and early 1930’s known as the Harlem Renaissance through examination of the history, politics, philosophy, literature, music, visual arts, dance and theatre of the movement within the American context.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Integrate and analyze events in American and world history, politics, thought and culture in relations to the Harlem Renaissance.
    2. Analyze the major cultural, philosophical, and political themes of the Harlem Renaissance, particularly in relation to race.
    3. Analyze and evaluate literature of the Harlem Renaissance in relation to the movement and larger culture of America.
    4. Analyze and evaluate music of the Harlem Renaissance, especially jazz, in relation to the movement and the larger culture of America.
    5. Analyze and evaluate art of the Harlem Renaissance in relation to the movement and the larger culture of America
    6. Analyze and evaluate dance and theatre of the Harlem Renaissance in relation to the movement and the larger culture of America.
  
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    HUM 110 PACIFIC RIM HUMANITIES (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A study of historical and contemporary interactions among Pacific Rim peoples (with an emphasis on Southeast Asian, Pacific Islander, and East Asian) and their respective artistic and cultural productions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare ethnic formations among Pacific Rim peoples in order to understand the evolution and effects of colonization and imperialism. 

    2. Analyze how biogeography and biopolitics inform Pacific Rim artistic and cultural production. 

    3. Analyze how works of art and cultural expressions are shaped by their historical, social, and economic contexts. 

    4. Distinguish images, themes, and ideas found in texts and cultural artifacts in order to examine how they are shaped by–and help shape–the cultures from which they originate. 

    5. Identify how Pacific Rim artistic and cultural productions interact with political and social justice movements. 

    6. Analyze racial and ethnic identity formations among Pacific Rim peoples in diasporic contexts. 

    7. Reflect on how individuals’ positional identities in learning spaces shape an understanding of the field of study. 
  
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    HUM 120 Introduction to World Folklore (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 120

    Course Description
    Offering an examination of folklore, the class provides an academic study of multi-generational cultural stories which are handed down through a variety of modalities. Students will explore the ways folklore reflects and creates communal traditions, values, and beliefs.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define concepts of folklore study (e.g. genre, group, tradition, performance, and/or aesthetics).
    2. Apply different theories and analytical lenses to the interpretation of folkloric materials.
    3. Analyze and evaluate how folklore influences and is influenced by identity, creation/maintenance, and expression of values related to concepts such as cultural context, power, social control, gender, identity, and economic status.
    4. Create folk texts through thorough investigations of past and present world folklore traditions, such as folk narrative, folk life, folk craft.
    5. Explain the unique characteristics and history of oral traditions.
  
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    HUM 161 Western Thought and Culture I: The Classical World (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of Western cultural ideas and expressions from early Aegean civilization to the 5th century C.E. Topics include history, geography, culture, philosophy, religion, art, architecture, and literature of the Greco-Roman world.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and interpret the major political and history events of the Greco-Roman world.
    2. Identify and interpret the political and physical geography of the ancient Greco-Roman world.
    3. Analyze the major philosophies and religions of the Greek and Roman cultures including the Greek and Roman pantheons, Judaism, and the development of Christianity. Contrast the ways in which these philosophies and religions influence and are reflected in the arts and cultures of their times and our own.
    4. Identify the characteristics of Greek and Roman art and explain how the art reflects the values of each culture and has influenced the modern era.
    5. Identify the elements of Greek and Roman architecture and explain how the architecture reflects the values of each culture and continues to influence culture today.
    6. Identify the influential works of Greek and Roman literature and explain how they reflect the culture of the era in which they were written and their significance to their culture and to modern culture.
    7. Differentiate the values of the Greek and Roman cultures and then explain how these values were influenced by history and religion and their impact on the arts, architecture literature, and music of their times.
    8. Analyze cultural influences from the Greco-Roman world to our contemporary world.
  
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    HUM 163 Western Thought and Culture III: Birth of Modern World (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    A survey of Western cultural ideas and expressions from the Italian Renaissance to the 18th century. Topics include history, geography, culture, philosophy, religion, science, art, architecture, literature, and music from the 15th – 18th centuries.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and interpret the major political and historical events of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical Periods.
    2. Identify the physical and political geography of 15th-18th century Europe.
    3. Analyze the major religious, philosophical, and scientific issues of the 15th-18th centuries, including the causes and effects of the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, and the Enlightenment. Contrast the ways in which religion, philosophy, and science influence and are reflected in the arts and cultures of their times and continue to impact our own.
    4. Identify the characteristics and major artists of Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical art and explain how the art reflects the values of each culture of the era in which it was created and continues to impact the modern era.
    5. Identify the elements of Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical architecture and explain how the architecture reflects the values of each culture in which it was created and continues to influence culture today
    6. Identify the major literature works of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical periods. Explain the significance of each work to its culture as well as to modern culture. Explain how the literature reflects the culture in which it was written. Identify major authors and their works.
    7. Define and identify various types of music of the Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods; explain how the different style of music reflects the values of their culture. Identify major composers and their works both by name and by listening to excerpts of the music.
    8. Differentiate the values of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical cultures. Explain how these values were influenced by history, religion, and science, and how they in turn impacted the art, architecture, literature, and music of their times.
    9. Analyze cultural influences from the 15th-18th centuries to the modern era.
  
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    HUM 204 American Popular Culture (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 204

    Course Description
    This course examines various theories of popular culture and applies these theories to various aspects of American culture, such as mass media, sports, fashion, and cultural stereotypes.

    Student Outcomes
    Define and use specific terminology relevant to the study of popular culture
    2. Analyze the impacts that mass media formats, such as television, radio, and the internet, have on American culture
    3. Apply tools of media literacy to distinguish among various types of mass communication (i.e., distinguish between
    advertising and editorial content)
    4. Evaluate the role that various art forms play in American culture
    5. Trace the formation of a variety of cultural stereotypes and identify examples of those stereotypes in various formats
    6. Identify current or significant popular culture trends in a variety of settings (for example, fashion, food, language,
    marketing, etc.)
    7. Examine the ways in which individuals use cultural trends to define or announce aspects of personal identity
    8. Defend or challenge one’s own relationship to popular culture and appraise the influence of cultural ideologies on
    one’s own values and sense of identity
    9. Read and discuss the works of a variety of culture critics
    10. Review prominent theories of Popular Culture (such as mass culture theory, Frankfurt School and culture industry,
    structuralism and semiotics, etc.)
    11. Evaluate aspects of Popular Culture according to specific criteria
    12. Locate and use a variety of cultural studies resources (including web sites, journals, and other references)
  
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    HUM 209 The American Civil Rights Movement (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course offers students a broad multicultural understanding of the American Civil Rights Movement through the Humanities: art, film, photography, oral histories, literature, theater, and music of the reform era. The course highlights the experiences and impact of local activists and organizations through the arts, presenting the movement from a “ground-up” perspective rather than a “top-down” to enhance students’ civic and multicultural literacy.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify a range of American Civil Rights Movement activists, including individuals as well as organizations.
    2. Explain local citizens’ (women, workers, preachers, teachers, students) direct action strategies in protesting legal, social, and civic injustices.
    3. Interpret the impact of local activists, specifically students and community organizations, on their respective communities, including those in the Northwest.
    4. Analyze primary documents of the American Civil Rights Movement.
    5. Evaluate the social, economic, and political contexts of the course content.
    6. Develop and demonstrate the ability to trace the nature of the oppression being protested and discuss the various tools of resistance.
    7. Examine major civil rights milestones, national figures, and events in direct relation to preceding protest from a variety of concurrent movements.
    8. Compare and contrast the traditional top-down approach, which focuses on legislation and national figures, to the American Civil Rights Movement’s ground-up approach, which focuses on local people’s activism and organization.
  
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    HUM 210 American Cinema and Society (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 210

    Course Description
    This course explores the relationship between the themes, major genres, and production of Hollywood cinema, and American social, political, and economic history from the early 1900s to the present.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define the key elements and significance of a Cultural Studies approach to film analysis.
    2. Examine how classic Hollywood narrative choices (character-centered cinema, meden agan, time and space manipulation), and camerawork (mise-en-scene, cinematography, seamless editing, sound) impact American cinema and its capacities for storytelling.
    3. Analyze the relationship between themes and production of Hollywood cinema, and American social, political, and economic history.
    4. Trace the evolutions of narrative cinema and the early history of Hollywood.
    5. Analyze the rise of the Hollywood studio system and the social, political, and economic changes in the 1950s that led to its end.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to recognize the features of the major Hollywood genres (such as Film Noir, Western, musicals, comedy, war film, social drama, horror, science-fiction) and describe how social, political, and economic changes in America are reflected in the changing content and popularity of these genres.
    7. Describe the social, political, and economic changes of the 1960s and 1970s, focusing on issues of equal rights and social change, and the rise of countercultural cinema.
    8. Analyze the events that led to the rise of the director as auteur in the late 1960s and 1970s, and describe the influence of film schools and television on Hollywood film content and production.
    9. Describe the impact of social, political, and economic changes from the 1980s to the present, and of new technologies—cable, satellite dishes, video recorders, DVD, camcorders—on the content and production of Hollywood cinema.
    10. Compare the history, production, and content of American independent cinema and 21st Century cinemas to earlier styles and eras, particularly with regard to diversity on film.
  
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    HUM 215 World Cinema (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 215

    Course Description
    World Cinema examines the films and film-making practices around the world. This class explores the production standards and cinema choices of film movements such as German Expressionism, Italian Neorealism, British Social Realism, The French New Wave, Parallel Cinema, 5th Generation Chinese film, Cinema Novo, and Third Cinema.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the various methods of film analysis/aesthetic of international cinemas, detailing how these methods differ from nation to nation, and culture to culture.
    2. Analyze and interpret a film from another culture.
    3. Examine how cultural differences impact film choices and film making.
    4. Analyze the relationship between a film’s themes and its social, political and economic history.
    5. Recognize and debate the features of national cinema and their (dis)use of conventional Western narrative film-making practices.
    6. Trace the evolution(s) of various national cinemas and film movements, their influences and their impact on other film makers.
    7. Compare the history, production and content of world cinema with Hollywood (Western) cinema. Describe the contributions and influence that various world cinema directors and film movements have had on world cinema.
    8. Understand and explain how different cultural beliefs lead to different modes of storytelling and expression.
  
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    HUM 240 World Religions (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 240

    Course Description
    Survey of five influential world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Exploration of the basic tenets, origins and evolution of each religion; reflection on the influence they have had on history, culture, and the arts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the unique history of each major religion.
    2. Explain major belief systems for each of the religions, as well as divergences among sects and other groupings within each religion.
    3. Describe some of the narratives and major deities of religious traditions.
    4. Identify the relationship between communal and individual religious practices.
    5. Discuss how religious traditions have influenced world views on community and the individual.
    6. Explain the relationship of religions traditions to cultural understanding of self and life’s meaning and purpose (i.e. time, nature, money, work, rest, education, power, birth, and death).
    7. Define what constitutes the divine or sacred in a given religion.
    8. Explain the relationship between soteriology and eschatology.
    9. Analyze how faith interacts with beliefs regarding chaos, order, intuition, and scientific thought.
  
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    HUM& 101 Introduction to Humanities (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly HUMAN 201 - CCN

    Prerequisite Eligibility for ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    Exposes students to works in the literary, performing, and visual arts. Students identify common themes in the arts, analyze works representing diverse perspectives, and investigate the political, social, and historical contexts of works. A broader understanding is encouraged through the exploration and synthesis of outside sources using research methods.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify themes, intent, and perspectives of works in the humanities.
    2. Describe characteristics of the various styles in the humanities (Classical, Barouque, Romantic, etc.)
    3. Employ correct discipline-specific terminology (music, art, literary) in order to analyze a work.
    4. Evaluate the significance of the social, political, or historical contexts of specific works in order to increase understanding of works within their historical frameworks.
    5. Synthesize personal impressions of a work in the humanities with secondary sources and other perspectives in order to produce an informed evaluation.
    6. Research the work of an artist outside of one’s own culture and create an educational presentation detailing an artist’s significance and contribution to that branch of the humanities.
    7. Access, evaluate, and use scholarly information and research methods in order to assist in analysis, comprehension, and appreciation of works in the humanities.
  
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    HUMDV 103 Pierceworks! - Career Transition (1 to 14 credits)



    Course Description
    A 7-week career transition course to assist individuals with components of career development and human relations. This course empowers students to explore careers and career clusters and make informed educational and career decisions. Students analyze interests, skills, personality, and attributes and use this information in the career selection process. Students use interest inventories and computer software to explore career opportunities available to them and link personal interests with related career fields. Activities enable students to increase self awareness and develop the skills necessary to successfully plan for postsecondary education and the workplace. Basic job search skills include contacting employers, writing, practicing interview skills. An emphasis is placed on developing appropriate skills necessary for success in the workforce. These employability skills include such areas as: teamwork, dependability, punctuality, attitude and relationship skills on the job.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify work values and attitudes. These include personal qualities such as dependability, punctuality, responsibility, integrity, team work, diversity, positive attitude.
    2. Develop and apply positive relationship skills.
    3. Analyze personality, career interests, values and aptitude assessments an apply tools to make realistic educational career choices.
    4. Research career information using the Internet, community and library resources.
    5. Set short and long-term personal and career goals.
    6. Create and use a dependable strengths report during job search.
    7. Create a hard copy, scan able and electronic resume and submit.
    8. Interview using appropriate oral skills and body language in telephone, one-on-one, panel and group interview settings.
    9. Complete a Master Job Application.
    10. Learn and apply the tools to manage change.
    11. Work effectively in culturally diverse teams to complete project assignments.
    12. Prepare a variety of business correspondences including cover letter, thank you letter, letters of application and introduction.
    13. Use software to format resumes, dependable strengths report, master application and business correspondence.
    14. Identify decision making steps.
    15. Follow written and oral instructions.
    16. Think creatively, make decisions and solve problems applicable to work place situations.
  
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    HUMDV 126 Life Skills: Stress Management (2 credits)



    Formerly Psych106i

    Course Description
    Course involves learning new techniques that help bridge personal transitions in life and in college, including learning to manage stress to remain balanced and healthy.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define stress within the current culture
    2. Examine stress and evaluate its negative effects
    3. Identify and analyze personal cues of, and reactions to stress
    4. Construct reactions to decrease stress
    5. Develop and apply new techniques for managing stress
  
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    IE 011 Reading/Writing 1 (10 credits)



    Course Description
    Reading/Writing 1 is for students with low-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study low-intermediate second language reading and writing concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a low-intermediate language level:
    1. Create an outline for an academic paragraph.
    2. Write simple paragraphs with topic sentences and support that demonstrate unity, coherence, focus and clarity.
    3. Identify eight parts of speech.
    4. Produce simple sentences using SVO (subject-verb-object) and S-LV-C (subject-linking verb-complement) sentence patterns.
    5. Compose compound sentences using and, but, so, or.
    6. Retell a low-intermediate story.
    7. Determine the meaning of unfamiliar low-intermediate vocabulary using a variety of strategies.
    8. Employ a range of pre-reading, during-reading and post-reading strategies using low-intermediate texts.
    9. Identify main ideas and supporting details in a low-intermediate text.
    10. Interpret charts, graphs, schedules, infographics or maps.
  
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    IE 012 Intensive English Grammar 1 (4 credits)



    Course Description
    Grammar 1 is for students with low-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study low-intermediate grammar concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a low-intermediate language level:
    1. Form positive and negative statements in the present and past with to have, to be, to do and regular verbs.
    2. Ask and answer yes/no questions and wh- questions in the present and past tense.
    3. Recognize errors in subject-verb agreement with regular nouns and verbs.
    4. Substitute subject, object and possessive pronouns for nouns appropriately.
    5. Use “there is” and “there are” in statements and questions.
    6. Use attributive and predicate adjectives to modify nouns.
    7. Use adverbs of frequency to modify verbs.
    8. Identify the form of nouns as singular, plural or non-countable.
    9. Understand basic rules of article (a, an, the) usage with singular nouns.
  
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    IE 013 Intensive English Listening & Speaking 1 (6 credits)



    Course Description
    Listening/Speaking 1 is for students with low-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study low-intermediate listening/speaking concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a low-intermediate language level:
    1. Produce and respond to greetings, introductions and closings in appropriate situations.
    2. Ask and answer simple Wh- and Yes/No questions.
    3. Express and respond to needs, wants, likes, dislikes and feelings using appropriate low-intermediate grammar.
    4. Retell a low-intermediate story.
    5. Present a short speech on a familiar topic.
    6. Separate words into syllables.
    7. Pronounce consonants, vowels, and blends intelligibly.
    8. Identify consonants, vowels and blends in low-intermediate listening materials.
    9. Identify the topic and some major details of low-intermediate listening materials.
    10. Take accurate notes on the topic and some major details of low-intermediate listening materials.
    11. Demonstrate a strategy for learning and remembering vocabulary.
  
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    IE 021 Reading/Writing 2 (10 credits)



    Course Description
    Reading/Writing 2 is for students with intermediate second language abilities. Students will study intermediate second language reading and writing concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an intermediate language level:
    1. Create an outline for an academic paragraph.
    2. Write effective academic paragraphs with topic sentences and support that demonstrate unity, coherence, focus and clarity.
    3. Write an effective academic essay that demonstrates unity, coherence, focus and clarity.
    4. Produce simple sentences using SVO (subject-verb-object), S-LV-C (subject-linking verb-complement) and S-V (subject-intransitive verb) sentence patterns.
    5. Produce simple sentences that have compound subjects and compound verbs.
    6. Produce compound sentences using so/for.
    7. Produce adverb clauses of time, cause and purpose.
    8. Quote intermediate texts in order to support a main idea in a paragraph.
    9. Summarize and respond to an intermediate text.
    10. Paraphrase sentences from an intermediate text.
    11. Determine the meanings of unfamiliar intermediate vocabulary using a variety of strategies.
    12. Employ a range of pre-reading, during reading and post-reading strategies.
    13. Interpret charts, graphs, schedules or maps.
    14. Find articles for a specific topic covered in class using Pierce College library databases.
  
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    IE 022 Intensive English Grammar 2 (4 credits)



    Course Description
    Grammar 2 is for students with intermediate second language abilities. Students will study intermediate grammar concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an intermediate language level:
    1. Form positive and negative statements using common present and past irregular verbs.
    2. Ask and answer yes/no questions and wh- questions using common present and past irregular verbs.
    3. Distinguish between situations requiring simple present and those requiring present progressive.
    4. Form present progressive statements and questions to refer to situations happening now or in the future.
    5. Form future statements and questions with “will” and “be going to”.
    6. Use comparative and superlative adjectives to modify nouns in common context.
    7. Use adverbs to modify verbs in common contexts.
    8. Use modal verbs to ask about and express ability and lack of ability.
    9. Use modal verbs to give, ask or deny permission.
    10. Use modal verbs to indicate possibility.
  
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    IE 023 Intensive English Listening & Speaking 2 (6 credits)



    Course Description
    Listening/Speaking 2 is for students with intermediate second language abilities. Students will study intermediate Listening/speaking concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an intermediate language level:
    1. Demonstrate skills required in order to engage and maintain a group discussion using expressions of agreement, disagreement, opinion, and interruptions in appropriate situations.
    2. Ask follow-up and clarification questions using appropriate intermediate grammar.
    3. Express personal opinions about topics discussed in class using appropriate intermediate grammar.
    4. Summarize a lecture, story or video.
    5. Present speeches expressing an opinion about a topic.
    6. Use an effective visual aid during a presentation or speech.
    7. Identify stressed syllables in words.
    8. Identify how changes in sentence stress patterns change the meaning of a sentence.
    9. Indicate the topic and some major details of intermediate listening material.
    10. Use notes taken while listening in order to complete a task.
    11. Demonstrate a strategy for learning and remembering vocabulary.
  
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    IE 031 Reading/Writing 3 (10 credits)



    Course Description
    Reading/Writing 3 is for students with high-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study high-intermediate second language reading and writing concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a high-intermediate language level:
    1. Create an outline for an academic essay.
    2. Write correctly-formatted, 4-5 paragraph academic essays that support, develop and prove a thesis.
    3. Define at least 50 headwords from the Academic Word List.
    4. Determine the meanings of unfamiliar high-intermediate vocabulary using a variety of strategies.
    5. Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implicit information in a high-intermediate reading.
    6. Employ a range of pre-reading, during reading and post-reading strategies.
    7. Identify and correct run-ons, comma splices and fragments.
    8. Identify vocabulary cues that indicate opinion statements in high-intermediate texts.
    9. Incorporate compound, complex and compound-complex sentences into academic essays.
    10. Integrate a high-intermediate reading through paraphrasing, quoting and citing in an essay.
    11. Produce simple sentences using SVO (subject verb object), S-LV-C (subject linking verb complement), S-V (subject intransitive verb) and S-V-IO-DO (subject verb indirect object direct object) sentence patterns.
    12. Summarize and respond to a high-intermediate text.
    13. Find articles for a specific topic covered in class using Pierce College library databases.
  
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    IE 032 Intensive English Grammar 3 (4 credits)



    Course Description
    Grammar 3 is for students with high-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study high-intermediate grammar concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a high-intermediate language level:
    1. Form present perfect statements and questions about actions completed in the past that affect the present.
    2. Form present perfect progressive statements and questions about ongoing actions that began in the past and affect the present.
    3. Form past perfect statements to explain the order of past events.
    4. Use adverb clauses of manner, purpose, result and contrast.
    5. Use modal verbs to make offers and requests.
    6. Use modal verbs to express obligation.
    7. Use modal verbs to express degrees of certainty.
    8. Use modal verbs to give advice.
    9. Form passive statements and questions using a variety of tenses.
  
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    IE 033 Intensive English Listening & Speaking 3 (6 credits)



    Course Description
    Listening/Speaking 3 is for students with high-intermediate second language abilities. Students will study high-intermediate listening/speaking concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at a high-intermediate language level:
    1. Use appropriate social and academic vocabulary for different audiences (register) with teacher guidance
    2. Recognize simple figurative language and idiomatic expressions
    3. Give speeches or presentations on familiar and academic topics
    4. Recall details and identify main points by paraphrasing or summarizing
    5. Identify the topic and specific details of high-intermediate listening material from selected sources
    6. Take detailed notes on high-intermediate listening material
    7. Pronounce high-intermediate vocabulary, phrases, and sentences intelligibly.
    8. Identify high-intermediate vocabulary and organizational cues in listening material
    9. Infer a speaker’s meaning based on tone and facial expression and body language
    10. Communicate information and ideas, and respond personally and critically
    11. Distinguish fact from opinion
    12. Actively participate in class discussions, interviews, group activities and pair work
  
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    IE 041 Reading/Writing 4 (10 credits)



    Course Description
    Reading/Writing 4 is for students with advanced second language abilities. Students will study advanced second language reading and writing concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an Advanced Language Acquisition Level:
    1.. Compose work in a variety of genres, including but not limited to thesis-driven, academic essays that incorporate researched sources (2,000 words minimum of formal writing, total, excluding revisions) by using the writing process.
    2. Apply key rhetorical concepts (writer, audience, subject, purpose, and context) in order to compose a variety of texts.
    3. Quote, paraphrase, cite and document sources appropriately to maintain academic honesty and intellectual integrity.
    4. Locate, read, and evaluate multiple primary and secondary research materials (both scholarly and popular) in order to demonstrate Information Competency.
    5. Summarize and respond to an Advanced Language Acquisition Level text.
    6. Incorporate sentences that include phrases such as gerunds, infinitives, participials, adverbials and appositives into academic essays.
    7. Define at least 50 headwords from the Academic Word List.
    8. Use context clues and word structures to identify word meanings and develop reading fluency
    9. Draw inferences and conclusions based on textual evidence in an Advanced Language Acquisition Level reading.
    10. Employ a range of pre-reading, during reading and post-reading strategies.
  
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    IE 042 Intensive English Grammar 4 (4 credits)



    Course Description
    Grammar 4 is for students with advanced second language abilities. Students will study advanced grammar concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an advanced language level:
    1. Identify common verbs only followed by gerunds, common verbs only followed by infinitives and common verbs followed by a gerund or an infinitive.
    2. Use restrictive and nonrestrictive adjective clauses to describe nouns.
    3. Use reduced adjective clauses to modify a noun in a sentence.
    4. Use noun clauses as subjects, as objects of verbs and as objects of prepositions.
    5. Use noun phrases to combine information as subjects, as objects of verbs and as objects of prepositions.
    6. Use real conditionals to express cause and effect.
    7. Use unreal conditionals to express hypothetical situations.
    8. Use adverbials to indicate time, distance, location, condition, cause, degree, focus and stance.
  
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    IE 043 Intensive English Listening & Speaking 4 (6 credits)



    Course Description
    Listening/Speaking 4 is for students with advanced second language abilities. Students will study advanced Listening/Speaking concepts in a sheltered classroom setting. Students must reach 80% competency overall in order to pass to the next level.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform the following outcomes at an advanced language level:
    1. Use and explain appropriate register for different audiences and purposes.
    2. Recognize figurative language and idiomatic expressions.
    3. Give speeches or presentations on academic topics which utilize reputable research sources.
    4. Retell details and identify main points by paraphrasing and summarizing.
    5. Identify the topic and specific details of advanced listening material from selected sources.
    6. Take detailed notes on advanced listening material.
    7. Pronounce advanced vocabulary, phrases and sentences intelligibly.
    8. Identify advanced vocabulary and organizational cues in listening material.
    9. Communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and respond personally and critically.
    10. Examine situation, audience and purpose and interact with sensitivity and respect.
    11. Recognize bias and perspective.
    12. Distinguish fact from opinion.
    13. Actively participate in class discussions, interviews, group activities and pair work.
  
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    INFO 101 Research Essentials (2 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to the essential skills, concepts and strategies for college-level research. Students will learn how to effectively access, use and evaluate information resources, including books, periodicals, databases and the Internet. Information strategies will be examined through the lens of information seeking behavior. Students will also explore information issues and theories such as information flow, censorship, intellectual freedom and bias and perspective.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and focus an academically appropriate topic or research problem.
    Apply information seeking theory in order to retrieve and synthesize meaningful content
    2. Navigate a variety of information systems and structures, including classification systems, catalogs and databases, in order to access information in a variety of formats.
    3. Articulate the theory behind and demonstrate the application of a repertoire of creative and flexible information seeking strategies in order to solve a problem in a focused manner.
    4. Analyze information in order to evaluate quality, relevance, and perspective.
    5. Synthesize new ideas into current thoughts; cite sources in order to use information responsibly and ethically.
    6. Identify the ideas and perspectives behind current information issues, such as censorship, intellectual freedom, information society, bias and perspective, and digital divide in order to recognize the role of information in society.
  
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    INFO 102 Problem Based Research in Professional/Technical Programs (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Intended for students in Professional/Technical programs.

    Course Description
    Introduction to the essential skills, concepts and strategies for academic and professional research. Using problems and topics encountered by professionals, students will learn how to effectively access, use and evaluate information resources. This course is intended for majors in professional/technical programs.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and articulate appropriate topics in the literature of a certain professional/technical field
    2. Explore recent research, current events, best practices, etc. in order to gain familiarity with concepts important within that field.
    3. Identify appropriate, credible information sources in order to access relevant information from diverse sources such as research institutions, government agencies, and professional publications.
    4. Apply a repertoire of creative and flexible information seeking strategies in order to problem-solve and successfully answer a research need.
    5. Utilize a variety of information finding tools (such as internet search engines, library catalogs, etc.) in order to locate resources using various methods.
    6. Demonstrate an ability to navigate various information structures (such as library databases and government websites) to access multiple formats such as print books, online journal articles, and government information.
    7. Analyze information in order to evaluate quality, relevance, and perspective.
    8. Identify and use citation tools in order to use information responsibly and avoid plagiarism.
  
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    INTP 101 Introduction to Language Interpreting (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to interpreting as a career. Outlines the role and responsibilities of interpreters, the various interpreting environments, and the significance of cultural factors in the field.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and explain the role and function of the interpreter.
    2. Differentiate the modes of interpreting and the factors that make each appropriate to a particular situation.
    3. Explore the settings (government agencies, institutions, etc.) in which interpreters work.
    4. Describe the contracting and employment of interpreters and the types of agencies with whom they contract.
    5. Identify various types of licensing and certification of interpreters and the requirements for each.
    6. Discuss primary points of the ethics of interpreting.
    7. Recognize and examine common issues of cross-cultural communication that arise in an interpreting situation.
    8. Explore the significance of regional variations and idioms in interpreting.
    Describe cultural beliefs and influences, particularly those specific to the interpreter’s languages that may have an impact on an interpreting assignment and discuss appropriate handling of the situation.
  
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    INTP 105 Ethics of Interpreting (3 credits)



    Course Description
    An exploration of the ethics, protocols, and legal aspects of interpreting, including certification requirements. Intended for those pursuing a career in interpreting.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the maintenance of client confidentiality in context.
    2. Explain the need for and maintain accuracy in all interpreting assignments.
    3. Adhere to proper protocols.
    4. Apply appropriate rules and codes of conduct prescribed by specific agencies, e.g. Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Interpreters’ Code of Ethics.
    5. Apply relevant Washington state law.
    6. Identify and describe types of interpreter certification and the relevant continuing education.
    7. Create a plan for obtaining and maintaining certification.
  
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    INTP 110 Foundations of Interpreting Skills (5 credits)



    Prerequisite INTP 101 (may be taken concurrently).

    Course Description
    Introduction to interpreting skills. Students develop intralingual skills and explore linguistic structures that support the complex process of interpretation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and explain the process of interpretation and the significance of each step of the interpretation process.
    2. Create a glossary of unfamiliar lexical items and usages, and use contents to expand vocabulary.
    3. Listen actively for comprehension and retention.
    4. Analyze written and spoken text for lexical units; grammar-based meaning; and spatial, physical and causal relationships.
    5. Remember 2-3 sentence utterances for repetition and paraphrase.
    6. Take effective notes to aid memory in consecutive interpreting.
    7. Read aloud clearly and audibly.
    8. Paraphrase written and spoken non-technical texts extemporaneously.
    9. Shadow a speaker in an extended, but not technical, utterance.
    10. Identify errors and their causes in own interpreting work.
    11. Develop a self-improvement plan based on error analysis.
  
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    INTS 107 Introduction to International Studies ( 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An introduction to global issues emphasizing the integrated and increasingly interdependent nature of the world, including: historical, political, economical, environmental and philosophical issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal aspects and the evolution of the problem/issue in question.
    2. Explain the chief components of the plans or campaigns intended to solve or ameliorate the problem in question.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) within the affected populations.
    4. Identify the major problems in different regions.
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible influence on the evolution and prospects for resolution of the aforementioned conflicts.
    6. Compare, contrast, and classify, the major issues facing humanity today.
    7. Determine the best possible approaches that could be used by the UN to deal with the said problems.
    8. Determine the most constructive policy towards major global problems.
    9. Discuss the impact of the said problems on regional and global security and stability.
  
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    INTS 140 Contemporary Issues in International Studies ( 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Contemporary issues facing a visiting foreign professor’s homeland, including but not limited to: historical, geographical, demographic, political, economic, environmental, and social/cultural issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the geography of the homeland of the visiting professor.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    2. Compare and contrast the cardinal developments in the civilization of the country in question.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    3. Explain the chief components (religious, economic, political) of the culture of the visiting professor’s homeland.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    4. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, racial, gender, artistic, intellectual) among different historical movements, changes, and trends.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    5. Discuss the impact of scientific and technological progress on humans and their environment.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    6. Determine the salient similarities and differences between the cultures of the U.S. and the native country of the visiting professor.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    7. Identify the major problems facing the homeland of the visiting professor.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
    8. Determine an overall plan for mutually beneficial ties between the U.S. and the homeland of the visiting professor, based on lessons that are drawn from history.
    (objective tests, essay tests, class discussions, class presentations, written assignments)
  
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    INTS 150 Contemporary Rebel, Secessionist, and Terrorist Organizations ( 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    The course will cover major rebel, separatist, guerrilla, and terrorist movements and organizations in the modern world. The emphasis will be not only on their origins and current status but also on efforts that are undertaken to bring about a peaceful resolution to the conflicts that have caused them.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the evolution of the organizations in question.
    2. Explain the chief components of ideologies/programs of the said organizations
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, economic, political, religious) within the said organizations.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the nations where these organizations operate. .
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible impact on the future status of the mentioned organizations. .
    6. Compare and contrast different rebel, separatist, irredentist and terrorist groups.
    7. Analyze the countermeasures by the governments of the affected nations.
    8. Determine the best possible approach that could be used by the U.S. in actions aimed at ending the violence.
    9. Determine the best possible position of the U.S. vis-à-vis any of the said organizations.
  
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    INTS 164 Border and Genocidal Conflicts in the Modern World ( 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course will examine the origins and evolution of many devastating conflicts in recent history. The teaching methodology will be based on combining the regional and chronological approaches and the intensive use of current articles in periodicals from all over the world.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze the pivotal developments in the evolution of the conflicts in question.
    2. Explain the chief components of the irredentist or ethnic cleansing programs and campaigns of the governments responsible for the said conflicts.
    3. Analyze the interconnections (social, ethnic, gender, artistic, intellectual, religious) within the affected populations.
    4. Identify the major problems facing the nations impacted by these conflicts.
    5. Draw conclusions from the past, discussing recent and present trends and their possible influence on the evolution of the aforementioned conflicts.
    6. Compare and contrast the border and genocidal conflicts in question.
    7. Determine the best possible approaches that could be used by the United Nations to end these conflicts.
    8. Determine the most constructive position to be taken by the U.S. towards ongoing border and genocidal conflicts.
    9. Discuss the impact of the said conflicts on regional and global security.
    10. Discuss major features of the geography, as well as fundamental aspects of the politics, economics, culture, and demography of the countries involved in border and genocidal conflicts.
  
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    ISS 110 Service Learning on Tour (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is intended for students who are on a study tour or alternative break either in the United States or out of the country. Through a service project, experiences on tour will be enhanced and the forces that shape culture more fully understood. The multicultural insight and direct immersion into social issues of the host community is intended to bring a deeper personal growth experience while on tour.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use a variety of information-gathering methods and sources to investigate cultural history of host community.
    2. Analyze current societal perceptions toward host community culture and toward volunteerism within the framework of social justice.
    3. Discuss the current solutions by the host community to local needs, in the context of the service activity.
    4. Cooperate as a team, while participating in a service activity in the host community to experience how needs are addressed by the community.
    5. Explain and demonstrate teamwork fundamentals.
    6. Reflect on personal impacts and roles of participation as a part of a team in the service activity.
    7. Explain how the service activity connects to other activities on the tour.
    8. Integrate personal learning and volunteer experience into decision-making regarding career pathway.
  
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    ISS 300 Social Studies for Teachers (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Admission into the BAS-T program.

    Course Description
    An overview of the main concepts in social studies for early childhood teachers including topic in history, civics, geography, economics, and global issues.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a framework for thoughtful and reflective participatory citizenship and civic decision-making by applying an understanding of local (mayors, city councils, school boards), state, and national government, law, and politics.
    2. Outline economic concepts and systems and explain the interactions among economy and individuals, households, businesses, governments, and societies.
    3. Explain how geographic features and human cultures shape and impact environments.
    4. Analyze how neighborhoods, communities, and societies have changed over time with an emphasis on the Pacific Northwest.
    5. Develop questions and plan social studies investigations using disciplinary concepts and tools.
    6. Evaluate sources, integrate multiple perspectives, and use evidence to understand social phenomena.
    7. Create a lesson plan for children birth through grade three using the Since Time Immemorial Curriculum, the content knowledge learned in this course, and the state standards.
  
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    JAPN& 121 Japanese I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. pronounce Japanese syllables, words, phrases, and simple sentences. B,D
    2. read and write all Hiragana characters accurately in words and short sentences. A, C, E
    3. use a basic vocabulary related to course themes with functional pronunciation. A, B, C, D, E
    4. use basic Japanese sentence structure. A, B, D, E
    5. introduce self and others, greet others with appropriate level of politeness, exchange simple personal information. A, B, D, E
    6. exchange simple statements and questions about daily activities. A, B, D, E
    7. make and respond to simple suggestions and proposals. A, B, D, E
    8. exchange information concerning money, time, and dates. A, B, D, E
    9. explain and discuss Japanese holidays and festivals (in English). A, E
    10. recognize and implement Japanese non-verbal/non-written communication. B, D
  
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    JAPN& 122 Japanese II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite JAPN& 121  with at least a 1.5 grade, or one year of high school Japanese, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The second quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student with the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. use the skills learned in Japanese 101 with greater speed and accuracy. A, B, C, D, E
    2. demonstrate improved listening and pronunciation. A, B, C, D, E
    3. read and write all Katakana and 75 Kanji characters. A, C, E
    4. read and write new words and complex sentences using Hiragana, Katakana, and some Kanji. A, C, E
    5. understand and use standard sentence structure, including simple subordinate clauses of time, place, consession, and condition.
    6. discuss food, travel, and study. A, B, D, E
    7. give location and directions to stores, schools, buildings, and city features A, B, D,E
    8. express likes, dislikes, and preferences A, B,D,E
    9. locate important sites and feature on a map of Japan
  
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    JAPN& 123 Japanese III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JPNSE 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite JAPN& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade, or two years of high school Japanese, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a first-year sequential course providing the student the ability to speak, read, write, and understand japanese.

    Student Outcomes
    1. use skills learned in Japanese 101/102 with greater speed and accuracy. A, B, C, D, E
    2. give a short, prepared presentation in Japanese. B, D, E
    3. describe immediate physical environment (clothing, furniture, and daily consumables). A, B, C, D, E
    4. discuss professions and work. A, B,C, D, E
    5. use different levels of politeness in conversation. B, C, D, E
    6. write a short formal letter in Japanese. A, E
    7. use “Indirect Speech Mannerism” in a conversation B,C, D, E
    8. read and write 200 Kanji (cumulative). A, C, E
    9. compare and contrast social behavior found in Japanese culture with own culture (in English). A, B, C, D, E
  
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    JOURN 102 Introduction to News Writing (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Communications; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite ENGL 098  with a grade of 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    A study of the basic forms and styles of various news writing techniques and mechanics. Writing exercises in basic news writing, as well as work in news gathering, interview techniques, copy assimilation, copy editing, headline writing and other roles of the reporter.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify credibility and ethics as the overarching standards of journalism.
    2. Recognize and eliminate personal bias, stereotypes and prejudice in reporting news.
    3. Define the basic elements of libel and invasion of privacy in news writing.
    4. Explain what makes certain types of information news worthy and why.
    5. Identify the campus market and brainstorm story ideas for that market.
    6. Develop a story plan, including angle, contacts and interview questions.
    7. Conduct an interview in a professional and effective manner.
    8. Recognize the elements of a story lead.
    9. Create story leads appropriate to the assigned story subjects.
    10. Develop a news story that utilizes a variety of quotes and paraphrases.
    11. Apply “color” to a story through the use of quotes, metaphors, similes, and sensory detail.
    12. Recognize and apply appropriate style, structure, and language in news writing.
  
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    JOURN 103 Introduction to Feature Writing (1 to 5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Instructor permission and JOURN 102  with 2.0 or better.

    Course Description
    A study and practice of the form and style of writing feature stories for the college newspaper. Students will serve as staff writers for The Pioneer and generate and/or receive feature story assignments for publication. This course is a sequel to JOURN 102, Intro to News Writing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify credibility and ethics as the overarching standards of journalism.
    2. Recognize and eliminate personal bias, stereotypes and prejudice in feature writing.
    3. Define the basic elements of privacy in feature writing, such as false light.
    4. Explain which topics are worthy of feature writing and why.
    5. Identify the student newspaper’s market and generate story ideas for that market.
    6. Develop a story plan, including angle, contacts and questions to ask.
    7. Conduct interviews in a professional and effective manner.
    8. Create leads other than the summary lead that are more appropriate for the subject and tone of the story.
    9. Develop a feature story that utilizes a variety of quotes and paraphrases.
    10. Apply “color” to each story through the use of quotes, metaphors, similes, and sensory detail.
    11. Recognize and apply appropriate style, structure, and language in feature writing.
  
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    JOURN 111 College Newspaper: Special Projects (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Practical experience in producing the college newspaper. Students may pursue specialty areas of interest such as writing, copyediting, desktop publishing, market research, advertising.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a newspaper story idea that is newsworthy to the campus market. (a, b)
    2. Conduct interviews with appropriate sources to gather information for a story. (a, b)
    3. Conduct additional research as needed to gather information for the story idea. (a, b)
    4. Write an effective lead for the story. (a, b, c,)
    5. Write the body of the story in an organized, articulate, and effective manner. (a, b, c,)
    6. Identify and execute basic newswriting tasks (such as typing up news briefs, publishing campus calendar, writing student spotlights, publishing scholarship information). (a, b, c, d)
    7. Design sections or subsections of the paper through desktop publishing. (a, b, c, d)
    8. Identify and execute basic newspaper production tasks (such as copyediting, market research, advertising, distribution, and other office duties. (a, b, c, d)
    9. Design and complete an individual contract for special projects. (a, b, c, d)
  
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    JOURN 112 College Newspaper Photojournalism (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Practical experience in shooting, developing photos for the school newspaper. Students should already have a basic working knowledge of photography.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize photojournalistic “moments” that are publishable for the market.
    2. Generate ideas to illustrate and complement, with photos, any given news story.
    3. Identify and execute appropriate camera skills needed for any given photo
    assignment (for example, posing, lighting, shutter speed, depth of field, flash).
    4. Write an effective cutline (photo caption) for any given news photograph.
    5. Create and maintain a professional clipbook (portfolio) of 10 published photos.
    6. Identify and apply key photojournalistic techniques used in professional photo samples.
    7. Scan negatives and adjust in Photoshop.
  
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    JOURN 120 Introduction to Broadcasting (5 credits)



    Prerequisite ENGL 098  with a grade of 2.0 or higher.

    Course Description
    A study of the styles and techniques of internet broadcasting with an emphasis on webcasts and podcasts, employing various delivery platforms to include but not limited to techniques in: video production (shooting, editing, microphone, lighting); motion graphics (titles and animated maps); and audio editing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate the general structure and motivation of the broadcast industry.
    2. Explain how broadcasting information (or lack of) defines society and its views of reality.
    3. Define select broadcasting terms.
    4. Write and produce a news story, commercial, public service announcement and/or promotional segment consistent with broadcast standards.
    5. Define select operational procedures used in broadcasting (for example: timing commercials, news stories, interviews, motion graphics).
    6. Conduct broadcasting interviews in styles appropriate to specific broadcasting media.
    7. Demonstrate ability to share and stream media using a variety of formats and delivery platforms.
  
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    JOURN 125 The Documentary: A Social Force (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Throughout history, the documentary film has been a major social force that has moved us, amused us, manipulated us and inspired us. Using viewings and group discussions, this class examines the history and genres of the non-fiction film and the social impact of modern documentaries.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize the impact of the documentary film on shaping a society.
    2. Explain how documentaries can shape our views of reality and motivate us to action.
    3. Compare the approach and motivation of influential documentary film producers.
    4. Identify and explain how market forces determine the production and exhibition of documentaries.
    5. Identify the primary genres or classifications of documentary films.
    6. Explain the history and development of the documentary film.
    7. Explain how social forces and technology caused documentary film production to evolve into a separate industry of entertainment films.
    8. Recognize the differences between a documentary, a docudrama, and a fact-based film.
    9. Identify ways in which individuals can influence the mass media industries to make them more useful and responsive to a society.
  
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    JOURN 211 College Newspaper: Special Projects (1 to 5 credits)



    Prerequisite Instructor permission required.

    Course Description
    Practical experience in producing the college newspaper. Students may pursue specialty areas of interest such as writing, copyediting, desktop publishing, market research, advertising.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a newspaper story idea that is newsworthy to the campus market. (a, b)
    2. Conduct interviews with appropriate sources to gather information for a story. (a, b)
    3. Conduct additional research as needed to gather information for the story idea. (a, b)
    4. Write an effective lead for the story. (a, b, c,)
    5. Write the body of the story in an organized, articulate, and effective manner. (a, b, c,)
    6. Identify and execute basic newswriting tasks (such as typing up news briefs, publishing campus calendar, writing student spotlights, publishing scholarship information). (a, b, c, d)
    7. Design sections or subsections of the paper through desktop publishing. (a, b, c, d)
    8. Identify and execute basic newspaper production tasks (such as copyediting, market research, advertising, distribution, and other office duties. (a, b, c, d)
    9. Design and complete an individual contract for special projects. (a, b, c, d)
  
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    JOURN 212 College Newspaper Photojournalism (1 to 5 credits)



    Course Description
    Practical experience in shooting, developing photos for the school newspaper. Students should already have a basic working knowledge of photography.

    Student Outcomes
    Recognize photojournalistic “moments” that are publishable for the market.
    2. Generate ideas to illustrate and complement, with photos, any given news story.
    3. Identify and execute appropriate camera skills needed for any given photo
    assignment (for example, posing, lighting, shutter speed, depth of field, flash).
    4. Write an effective cutline (photo caption) for any given news photograph.
    5. Create and maintain a professional clipbook (portfolio) of 10 published photos.
    6. Identify and apply key photojournalistic techniques used in professional photo samples.
    7. Scan negatives and adjust in Photoshop.
  
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    KINS 110 Introduction to Personal Wellness (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is an overview of human health and wellness and focusses on student development of self-empowerment in relation to health promotion, disease prevention and other wellness topics.  Students will engage in self-assessment activities to promote enhanced health and wellness for themselves and others.

    Student Outcomes
    A. Discuss the dimensions of wellness, factors that influence these dimensions and how they are interrelated. 
    B. Evaluate one’s level of health and wellness and describe how these levels impact their quality of life.
    C. Demonstrate communication competencies that will facilitate one’s ability to work collaboratively with others.
    D. Identify strategies to safely manage an unhealthy or potentially violent situation in order to prevent abuse and assault. 
    E. Discuss health-related diversity strategies to deliver equitable and culturally appropriate wellness messaging and services for under-served populations.
  
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    KINS 128 CPR/AED for Professional Rescuer BBP and First Aid (2 credits)



    Course Description
    A National American Red Cross sponsored course:  CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers (CPRO) trains individuals with a duty to act, to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, children and infants until more advanced medical personnel take over. Students are also trained in responding to first aid emergencies.  The CPRO and First Aid components of this course is two-year certifications.  The Blood Borne Pathogen component of this course is a one-year certification. The technical content of this CPR/AED for Professional Rescuer course is consistent with the most current science and treatment recommendations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the responsibilities and characteristics of professional rescuers and the legal considerations.
    2. Demonstrate standard precautions that should be taken to prevent disease transmission and the use of all equipment: personal protective equipment (PPE), manikins, rescue breathing masks, disposable face shields, gloves, and bag valve mask resuscitators (BVM).
    3. Demonstrate how to perform a primary assessment. 
    4. Analyze the causes and symptoms of cardiac arrest and then demonstrate the proper protocol of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and rescue breathing.
    5. Identify the symptoms of airway obstruction and demonstrate the proper protocol for breathing emergencies. 
    6. Identify precautions for early use of an automatic external defibrillator (AED) and demonstrate how to use an AED. 
    7. Demonstrate assessment and treatment of injuries—to include control of external bleeding, infection control, and musculoskeletal injuries—sudden illnesses, poisonings, drug and alcohol emergencies, and heat and cold related emergencies. 
    8. Discuss water emergencies, wilderness emergencies, and natural disasters, and steps for disaster preparation at home and work.
  
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    KINS 154 Kinesiology Foundations (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course will provide students with an introduction to human movement that includes historical development of physical education, exercise science and sport. It is an introductory course provding students with the knowledge base, as well as information on expanding career opportunities in the discipline of kinesiology.  

    Student Outcomes
    Effectively communicate the traditional and emerging concepts regarding the importance of physical activity and exercise across the lifespan to diverse audiences. 
    Investigate current career trends and the various associations, credentialing, licensure, and educational pathways/requirements within the sub-disciplines of kinesiology.  
    Articulate the evidence-based learning and problem-solving.
    Identify preparation and planning steps for professional training and career-planning. 
    Explain the common ethical practices that encompass all of kinesiology and its subdisciplines from a leadership perspective.
    Reflect and explore the impact of an academic community engagement experience to effectively understand the relevance of civic responsibility and the impact on the community. 
    Demonstrate and reflect on the historical, social, and cultural factors that influence physical health and well-being and incorporate this knowledge into culturally relevant health & fitness plans for individuals and diverse populations.
  
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    KINS 155 Anatomy & Physiology Health/Fitness Professionals (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An introductory course designed to foster student knowledge, skills and capabilities necessary for advanced coursework in the Kinesiology Program. This course provides students with an introduction to basic anatomy, physiology and chemistry with an emphasis on its relationship to exercise, performance and health.

    Student Outcomes
    Demonstrate the use of correct anatomical terminology to describe body part locations, body planes, movements, and structural organization of the human body.
    Articulate the function and structural differences of cells and tissues, the development of human organs and organ systems, and the homeostatic relationship between body systems and exercise.
    Describe basic neuromuscular concepts in relation to muscles function in joint movement and work together effecting motion.
    Articulate the basis for all chemical reactions as they underlie body processes through recognition, differentiation, and description of the basics of chemistry and biochemistry.
    Demonstrate knowledge of ethical and professional behavior related to the integrity of others during individual and cooperative activities.
    Analyze sources relevant to topics being investigated and critically evaluate scientific information to help make decisions with respect to health.
    Demonstrate proficiency in technique and safety for use of a microscope.
  
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    KINS 180 An Introduction to ‘Stay Active and Independent for Life’ (SAIL) (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course is designed to equip the health and fitness professional with the knowledge and skills necessary to establish and lead a fitness program for older adults, with an emphasis on preventing falls in older adults.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify risk factors for falling in older adults, and list the four key CDC strategies for fall prevention.
    2. Identify best practices for fall prevention in older adults.
    3. State the rationale for each component of the SAIL strength, balance, and fitness class and discuss how each component contributes to fall prevention in an older adult.
    4. State the five components of a SAIL strength, balance, and fitness class, demonstrate how to perform each exercise in each component, and demonstrate how to adapt each exercise to a seated position.
    5. State the requirements for starting a SAIL Program in a community that will maximize the long-term success of the Program.
    6. Demonstrate the ability to perform Fitness Checks (Timed Up & Go, Chair Stand, Biceps Curl) with older adults, and discuss and interpret the results.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to complete the Class Evaluation Tool, and develop a plan to achieve compliance to maintain fidelity of the SAIL Program.
    8. Demonstrate how to integrate the SAIL Information Guide, and the SAIL Exercise Guide in a SAIL Program to achieve acceptance of the guides by older adults.
    9. Identify common age-related chronic health conditions, and discuss safety precautions for exercising with each medical condition.
    10. Identify reasons why older adults do not exercise, and discuss strategies to gain their compliance with healthy behaviors.
  
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    KINS 210 Wellness (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to investigate the dimensions of health and to assist students with making deliberate choices about lifestyle characterized by personal social responsibility and optimal enhancement of their dimensions of health.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the dimensions of wellness and illustrate the interplay among them.
    2. Describe the concept of one’s own wellness in contrast to the simple absence of disease.
    3. Describe how poverty, race, and gender contribute to health disparities in the United States.
    3. Analyze facets of self-responsibility in a wellness lifestyle.
    4. Identify the characteristics of emotionally healthy persons.
    5. Identify risk factors in college students for mental health problems.
    6. Discuss how stress can affect the cardiovascular, immune, endocrine, neurological, reproductive and digestive systems.
    7. Identify stressors that are commonly reported by college students.
    8. Identify skills that improve communication including online social environments.
    9. Discuss the connection between one’s body and the foods we eat and how our daily diets affect how long and how well we live.
    10. Describe the health-related components of physical fitness and their potential health benefits.
    11. Discuss life behaviors of sexually healthy and responsible adults.
    12. Describe the effects and health risks of common drugs of abuse including legal and illegal drugs.
  
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    KINS 250 Kinesiology (5 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 155  

    Course Description
    A course designed to introduce students to the study of skeletal and muscular structures as they are involved in the science of movement and the application of this knowledge for evaluating, improving, and maintaining muscular strength, endurance, flexibility and overall health of individuals.   

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe and demonstrate the correct use of anatomical and directional terminology. 
    2. Articulate the basic neuromuscular concepts in relation to how muscles function in joint motions and the neural control mechanisms for human movement. 
    3. Describe the basic effects of mechanical loading on bone, muscles, cartilaginous and ligamentous structures in the human body.
    4. Apply the concepts of kinematics and kinetics to help improve physical performance using both quantitative and qualitative data.
    5. Identify all skeletal muscles involved in human movement at each joint of the body by listing, drawing, labelling or palpating.  
    6. Describe structural abnormalities, postural abnormalities, deformities and muscular imbalances and make recommendations based upon analysis of human movement.
    7. Analyze common exercises to determine joint movements, muscles involved, contraction types, and teaching techniques using proper cueing.
    8. Assess joint specific Range of Motion (ROM) using various protocols, tools, and use measurements to develop an exercise prescription. 
    9.Evaluate information and its sources critically using scientific research.
  
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    KINS 252 Nutrition for Sport and Exercise (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course explores the relationship between nutrition and physical performance. Students will be introduced to trends in the field of sports nutrition and safe and effective nutritional practices for physical activity and exercise.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate the steps involved in the metabolic processes and the impact of exercise duration and intensity. 
    2. Differentiate between the various methods for measurement of energy expenditure.
    3. Apply recommendations for nutrients based on dietary intake before, during, and after various exercise durations, intensities, and types using the US Dietary Guidelines as a tool.
    4. Discuss the potential benefits and risks of dietary supplements and nutritional ergogenic aids. 
    5. Evaluate the role of thermal balance and hydration for pre and post exercise.
    6. Identify and discuss various cultural nutritional practices and applications with reference to exercise and physical activity.
  
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    KINS 253 Essentials of Weight Management (2 credits)



    Course Description
    This course introduces students to weight management strategies for a healthier lifestyle.  Students will investigate nutritional fundamentals, the impact of physical activity and exercise on weight management and develop dietary plans to address weight management goals. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Compare dietary approaches to weight management based upon macronutrient recommendations.
    2. Evaluate energy expenditure, body composition, appetite, using various assessment methods and guidelines.
    3. Identify physiological influences on body weight such as genetics, storage of fat and neurotransmitters.
    4. Analyze personal behavior, environment, and risk factors that influence body weight and may lead to chronic disease and/or disorders. 
    5. Apply a behavior change approach and a goal setting approach for weight management.
  
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    KINS 254 Essentials of Fitness Training (5 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 250 , KINS 260 , KINS 256  

    Course Description
    This course is designed to introduce students to the components of an exercise prescription, the fundamentals of exercise training and comprehensive exercise program design.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate the legal responsibility and risk associated with the profession.

    2. Discuss the functions of the major body systems and their role in exercise.

    3. Demonstrate the components of the initial consultation using a client-centered approach: to include a risk assessment, and identification of determinants for discontinuing exercise.

    4. Design and implement exercise prescriptions that include the health-related and skill-related components.

    5. Design and implement exercise prescriptions using the Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type, Volume and Progression (FITT-VP) principles and indications for monitoring to achieve results and avoid overtraining.

    6. Articulate the benefits, methods and modalities of resistance training, cardiovascular training, flexibility and neuromotor training, and sports performance training.
  
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    KINS 256 Exercise Physiology (5 credits)



    Course Description
    This course introduces students to the physiological effects of exercise in the human body and its implications for enhanced health and improved physical performance. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate anatomical and physiological concepts specific to systems and as they relate to the adaptation responses to exercise based upon sound physiological evidence.
    2. Describe the adaptations to acute and chronic exercise, to include aerobic and anaerobic training.
    3. Examine the neuromuscular concepts, to include force development, fiber recruitment, fiber typing, contraction type, speed of contraction, delayed onset of muscle soreness, and fatigability of the muscle.
    4. Discuss the three energy systems with respect to the rate at which energy can be produced and sustained.
    5. Describe hormonal regulation as it applies to metabolism and fluid balance during exercise.
    6. Examine the body composition and nutritional needs of an individual, considering the importance of optimal body composition for peak exercise and athletic performance. 
    7. Apply various methods using the results of measurements for energy expenditure, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, body composition, and the concepts behind the measurement tools used to improve performance and/or fitness.
  
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    KINS 257 Coaching Techniques and Business Basics (3 credits)



    Course Description
    A course is designed to familiarize the health and fitness professional with theories of behavior change, factors contributing to exercise adherence, and understanding the elements necessary for effective coaching.  Students will also examine potential career starting points, learn business basics including how to maintain professional and industry standards, legal liability issues and risk management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss the academic and professional preparation for a career in the field, to include professional career options and future trends.
    2. Describe barriers and strategies for implementing behavior change with specific customization for populations, while demonstrating cultural sensitivity.
    3. Apply leadership and lifestyle coaching skills through role-playing and modeling behaviors.
    4. Design a business plan for starting a business, or a plan for gaining employment with an established company.
    5. Discuss professional liability insurance, licensures, certifications and other professional competencies, to include scope of practice, sexual harassment, and client confidentiality.
    6. Discuss operating procedures including an emergency plan.
  
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    KINS 258 Care and Prevention of Injuries (3 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to familiarize the health and fitness professional with guidelines and recommendations for preventing injuries, recognizing injuries, and learning how to safely manage specific injuries and emergency situations.  

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the various roles and responsibilities as they relate to specific areas of specialization in sports medicine.
    2. Describe the efficacy of proper programming for injury prevention, to include conditioning, strengthening, flexibility and core conditioning.
    3. Protect oneself legally and physically, to include an exposure plan, documentation, liability insurance, scope of practice, operating procedures, and confidentiality.
    4. Describe the process of healing, inflammation and tissue repair, drawing upon the basic anatomy and kinesiology for common sports and fitness related injuries.
    5. Describe the emergency action plan, principles of on-site injury assessment, primary assessment and a secondary assessment.
    6. Define and describe the potential dangers of hyperthermia and hypothermia, high altitude, and specific safety issues related to weather conditions.
    7. Demonstrate basic skills of injury rehabilitation management of injuries and conditions to include development of goals and selection of exercise modalities for therapeutic exercise and taping.
    8. Demonstrate the standardized assessment of concussions and head injuries and discuss the key provisions of the Zachary Lystedt Law.
  
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    KINS 259 Exercise for Special Populations (3 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to introduce students to indications, contraindications, modifications and guidance for developing exercise prescriptions for groups of individuals who exhibit medical conditions that impair health and functional ability. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Discuss and define one’s role as a part of the health care team, Scope of Practice and nationally recognized guidelines including the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). 
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the anatomical and physiological changes associated with the conditions of special populations.
    3. Make decisions based upon the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines using pre-participation screening, precautions, and the health history.
    4. Design an exercise prescription and a detailed exercise program with appropriate documentation throughout the process for a variety of special populations with reference to standard indications and contraindications.
  
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    KINS 260 Health Appraisal and Fitness Assessment (3 credits)



    Course Description
    The course incorporates current industry standards for health appraisal and fitness assessment techniques to optimize client safety during exercise participation.

    Student Outcomes
    Conduct a preparticipation health screening including medical clearance, application of the preparticipation algorithm, and identification of risk based on the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription and when appropriate the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) Risk Stratification   
    Execute a comprehensive health fitness evaluation incorporating all elements of the evaluation based on American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Guidelines.  (Resting assessments, Body Composition, Muscular Fitness, Flexibility, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Balance and Functional Fitness)  
    Analyze and interpret health-related fitness assessment results with a health-related outcome in mind.
    Articulate the general principles of exercise prescription using the FITT-VP to meet individual health and physical fitness goals within the context of individual health status, function, and the respective physical and social environment.
    Develop an exercise prescription based on health-related fitness assessment results, using FITT-VP principle (frequency, intensity, time, type, volume, progression).
  
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    KINS 262 Internship (5 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 110, KINS 128, KINS 155 , KINS 250 , KINS 252 KINS 253 , KINS 254 , KINS 256 , KINS 257 , KINS 258 , KINS 259 , KINS 260, and KINS 263   

    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a workplace experience/on the job training to connect their classroom academic and instructional learning in the Kinesiology Program and provide them with professional employable skills while being mentored by an employer. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a sense of the standards of professionalism within the various sectors of the field, to include timeliness, responsibility, professional dress, and effective communication.
    2. Articulate long-term career goals and intent to pursue national certification exam and/or credentials required for employability in the industry upon completion of work-based learning experience hours.
  
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    KINS 263 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed to introduce students to the study of people and their behaviors in sports and exercise settings. Students will also identify innovative strategies for use in coaching and facilitating both lifestyle change and performance enhancement. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Articulate one’s own experiences of peak performance.

    2. Demonstrate the techniques used to engage, motivate, build confidence, and assist with adherence to exercise and enhanced sports performance such as: goal setting, imagery, self-rating tools, cognitive techniques, and mental skills training.

    3. Discuss the implementation and use of behavior management techniques for sports teams and group exercise settings.

    4. Discuss and articulate the unique psychological factors related to injury and rehabilitation.

    5. Compare and contrast various gender and cultural consideration for sport and exercise environments.

    6. Demonstrate leadership techniques to enhance effective group dynamics and cohesion with sports teams.
  
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    KINS 266 Internship (2 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 110, KINS 128, KINS 155 , KINS 250 , KINS 252 , KINS 253 , KINS 254 , KINS 256 , KINS 257 , KINS 258 , KINS 259  and KINS 260  

    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a workplace experience/on the job training to connect their classroom academic and instructional learning in the Kinesiology Program and provide them with professional employable skills while being menored by an employer.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a sense of the standards of professionalism within the various sectors of the field, to include timeliness, responsibility, professional dress, and effective communication.
    2. Articulate long-term career goals and intent to pursue national certification exam and/or credentials required for employability in the industry upon completion of work-based learning experience hours.
  
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    KINS 267 Internship (3 credits)



    Prerequisite KINS 110, KINS 128, KINS 155 , KINS 250 , KINS 252 , KINS 253 , KINS 254 , KINS 254 , KINS 257 , KINS 258 , KINS 258  and KINS 260 .

    Course Description
    This course is designed to provide students with a workplace experience/on the job training to connect their classroom academic and instructional learning in the Kinesiology Program and provide them with professional employable skills while being mentored by an employer. 

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop a sense of the standards of professionalism within the various sectors of the field, to include timeliness, responsibility, professional dress, and effective communication.
    2. Articulate long-term career goals and intent to pursue national certification exam and/or credentials required for employability in the industry upon completion of work-based learning experience hours.
  
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    KREA& 121 Korean I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a first-year sequential course designed to provide to students the ability to speak, read, write, and understand the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to greet others and introduce oneself using given names.
    2. Identify the difference between Sino-Korean and native Korean numbers, and use them properly in sentences.
    3. Recognize and verbally articulate Korean terms for body parts and illnesses.
    4. Recognize and articulate basic oral Korean commands, such as sit, stand, greet and shake hands.
    5. Tell time orally, associating time with appropriate activities.
    6. Recognize and articulate Korean terms for articles of clothing and associated colors.
    7. Conjugate Korean verbs.
    8. Use at least five Korean terms to provide oral directions to a specified location.
    9. Describe traditional practices associated with Korean New Year, such as wearing traditional attire (Hanbok), visiting elders, bowing to demonstrate respect.
  
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    KREA& 122 Korean II (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 102 - CCN

    Prerequisite KREA& 121  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    A continuation of KREA& 121, with a focus on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate mastery of Korean 121 course content with increased levels of speed and accuracy.
    2. Identify when to use Sino-Korean and when to use native Korean numbers when talking about age, weight, height, social security number, driver license number and telephone number.
    3. Question classmates to determine their daily schedules.
    4. Use “don’t” and “can’t” to discuss individual interests and skills.
    5. Describe community activities as depicted in pictures.
    6. Respond to questions regarding daily activities, such as taking a taxi, buying clothes and telling time.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to use informal verb forms when speaking to friends and peers, while using formal verb forms when speaking to seniors, parents and superiors.
    8. Use Korean vocabulary to describe cashing a check, counting money.
    9. Use at least five Korean direction words to provide directions to a specified location.
    10. Describe the Korean use of lunar and solar calendars, and how this results in two Korean birthdays.
  
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    KREA& 123 Korean III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly KREAN 103 - CCN

    Prerequisite KREA& 122  with at least a 1.5 grade or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Continuation of KREA& 122, with a focus on speaking, reading, writing, and understanding the Korean language.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate mastery of Korean 122 course content with increased levels of speed and accuracy.
    2. Use a sketch map to give directions and find a place.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to determine a classmate’s hobbies and favorite sport through direct questioning.
    4. Ask questions about shopping using honorific forms, and convert from the honorific to the plain form.
    5. Make a reservation and order food in a restaurant using correct Korean grammar.
    6. Use previously learned vocabulary and sentence structures to describe taking a short trip.
    7. Ask for and demonstrate understanding of directions to a specific location or landmark within a city.
    8. Use Korean vocabulary to buy stamps, cards and envelopes at a post office, and to make inquiries about the cost of postage.
    9. Identify Korea’s major holidays and compare them to America’s major holidays.
  
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    MATH 050 Basic Mathematics (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Operations and applications with whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers. Order of operations. Converting among number representations; placing numbers in order. Basic applications, including use of percent and geometry. Study strategies.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Whole numbers
    a. Read and write whole numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations (add, subtract, multiply, divide) with whole numbers.
    c. Calculate squares and cubes, and square roots of perfect squares.
    d. Perform multistep calculations with whole numbers using the correct order of operations.
    e. Perform techniques of rounding with whole numbers.
    f. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, and subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.

    2. Fractions
    a. Perform the four basic operations with positive fractions.
    b. Convert between improper fraction and mixed numbers.

    3. Decimals
    a. Read and write decimal numbers and identify place value. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    b. Perform the four basic operations with positive decimals.
    c. Perform techniques of rounding with decimal numbers.
    d. Convert between decimal and percent representations.

    4. Integers
    a. Perform the four basic operations with integers.

    5. Inter-classification
    a. Convert numbers between decimal, fraction, and percent representations.
    b. Place whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and integers in numerical order.

    6. Applications
    a. Solve a variety of application problems.
    b. Solve basic applications with percents.
    c. Determine the perimeter and area of rectangles and triangles. Determine the volume of a rectangular box. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).

    7. Study Strategies
    a. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    b. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    8. General Skills
    a. Perform all arithmetic operations without use of a calculator.
    b. Use correct order of operations for calculations.
    c. Estimate solutions to problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    d. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    e. Clearly communicate solution processes.
    f. Use a computer to engage in some of the course activities.
  
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    MATH 051 Fundamentals of Arithmetic (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Solve problems including percent, ratio and proportion, measurement, and geometric figures. Introduction to signed numbers, measures of center, and interpretation of basic data graphs.

    Student Outcomes
    Numbers and Operations with Numbers (Content A)
    1. Read and write whole and decimal numbers and identify digit place values. Convert from English words to numbers and from numbers to English words.
    2. Perform the four basic operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division) with whole numbers without a calculator including using the correct order of operations.
    3. Perform the four basic operations with any rational numbers expressed in fractional notation without a calculator.
    4. Perform the four basic operations with the rational numbers expressed in decimal notation without a calculator.
    5. Convert between rational numbers expressed in fractional notation and decimal notation without a calculator.
    6. Perform techniques of rounding with decimal numbers.

    Percents, Ratios, and Proportions, Basic Geometry (Content B, C, and D)
    7. Solve basic problems involving ratios, proportions and percents without a calculator.
    8. Solve a variety of application problems, including the following: Solve application problems involving percents including simple interest formula. Solve application problems involving proportions, such as scale drawings or geometric similarity.
    9. Determine the perimeter and area of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine the volume of rectangular boxes and cylinders. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).

    Signed Numbers (Content E)
    10. Place signed numbers in numerical order.
    11. Perform the four basic operations with the signed numbers without a calculator.

    Measurement (Content F)
    12. Determine the appropriate measuring unit within the U.S. and the Metric systems.
    13. Convert between units of measurement within the U.S. and the Metric systems.

    Statistics (Content G)
    14. Create graphs to represent data and interpret data represented in basic statistical graphs.
    15. Calculate mean, median, and mode given data.

    Writing
    16. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.

    General Skills
    17. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
    18. Communicate methods of solutions and solutions to problems for the clarity of the receiver, including units as appropriate.
    19. Estimate solutions to a variety of problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    20. Perform basic operations with a calculator.
  
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    MATH 054 Beginning Algebra (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score, or MATH 050  with a grade of at least 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Operations with fractions, decimals, percents, and signed numbers. Simplify algebraic expressions. Solve linear equations. Solve a variety of application problems. Square roots, exponents, and coordinate graphing. Determine area, perimeter, and volume. Calculate statistical measures of center and interpret graphs.

    Student Outcomes
    Note: All the outcomes should be performed without a calculator, except as noted.

    Numbers and operations (content A, B, C)
    1. Perform the four basic operations with positive and negative rational numbers expressed in fractional notation and decimal form. Calculate with exponents.
    2. Perform multi-step calculations with rational numbers using the correct order of operations. Place rational numbers in order.
    3. Compute with percents, and interpret results.
    4. Find square roots of perfect squares without a calculator, and use a calculator to find approximate square roots.
    5. Demonstrate math fact fluency (aka automaticity) in number skills by recalling basic math facts of single-digit addition, single-digit products, subtraction and division resulting in a single digit with speed and accuracy. Student must meet the department established minimum standard.


    Algebraic expressions – simplification and evaluation (content D, E)
    6. Manipulate basic algebraic expressions, using correct order of operations and combining like terms.
    7. Perform the four basic operations with algebraic fractions (for fractions that have monomial numerator and denominator).
    8. Simplify algebraic exponential expressions involving positive integer exponents.
    9. Evaluate algebraic expressions and formulas without a calculator.
    10. Use a calculator to evaluate numeric expressions, including those with parentheses and exponents.

    Solving linear equations (content F)
    11. Distinguish between algebraic expressions and equations.
    12. Solve one-variable linear equations, including those with grouping symbols and with the variable on both sides.

    Applications (content G)
    13. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions.
    14. Solve a variety of application problems, including the following: Solve application problems involving percents including percent increase/decrease problems and simple interest formula. Solve application problems involving proportions, such as scale drawings or geometric similarity.

    Geometry (content H)
    15. Determine the area and perimeter of rectangles, triangles, and circles. Determine the volume of rectangular boxes and cylinders. Express these solutions with the correct units. Determine these solutions with no outside references (that is, memorize these geometric formulas).
    16. Measure lengths using units of the metric system and the U.S. system.
    17. Convert between units of measure within the metric system and the U.S. system.

    Statistics (content I)
    18. Given data, calculate the mean, median, and mode.
    19. Create graphs to represent data and interpret data represented in statistical graphs.

    Coordinate Graphs (content J)
    20. Graph points on a coordinate axes system. Identify points graphed on a coordinate system, including axes intercepts.
    21. Graph linear equations by plotting points.

    Study Strategies (content K)
    22. Create a study plan incorporating a variety of study techniques that can contribute to success in learning mathematics.
    23. Describe a variety of techniques and strategies for reducing math or test anxiety, and reflect on which techniques might be of personal benefit.

    General Skills
    24. Estimate solutions to a variety of problems, and apply estimation to judge the reasonableness of calculated solutions.
    25. Use appropriate units when answering application problems. Express solutions to problems correctly in phrases when appropriate. Use mathematical terms and vocabulary correctly.
    26. Clearly communicate solution processes.
  
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    MATH 060 Introduction to Algebra (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score or MATH 051 with a grade of at least 3.0 or MATH 054 with a grade of 2.0 or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Basic operations with numeric and polynomial expressions solving linear equations, linear inequalities, systems of linear equations, and quadratic equations linear graphs applications.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Number Systems and Operations (Review topic)
    a. Distinguish between the different Number Systems (Real, Rational, Integers, Whole, Natural, Irrational).
    b. Perform basic operations with real numbers: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, raising to powers, and evaluating square roots.
    c. Evaluate numeric expressions using order of operations.

    2. Algebraic Expressions
    a. Simplify polynomial expressions using addition, subtraction, multiplication, division by monomials, combining like terms, and the order of operations.
    b. Evaluate and simplify expressions involving integer exponents, including negative exponents and scientific notation.
    c. Evaluate algebraic expressions with multiple variables.
    d. Factor polynomial expressions using the techniques of: factoring out a greatest common factor factoring by grouping, factoring trinomials of the form ax2 + bx + c and factoring the difference of squares.
    e. Distinguish between algebraic expressions and equations.

    3. Linear Equations and Inequalities in One Variable
    a. Solve linear equations in a single variable.
    b. Solve linear and compound inequalities and represent solutions graphically.
    c. Solve linear formulas for a specified variable, including geometric formulas.

    4. Graphs of Linear Equations
    a. Identify and plot points on the Cartesian plane
    b. Graph two-variable linear equations by plotting points and by using slopes and intercepts.
    c. Find and interpret slopes and intercepts given a linear graph or a linear equation.

    5. Equations in Two Variables
    a. Determine the equation of a line given sufficient information.
    b. Solve systems of linear equations in two variables graphically and algebraically using substitution and elimination.

    6. Applications
    a. Analyze word expressions and translate them into algebraic expressions.
    b. Obtain and synthesize relevant information and use appropriate formulas in order to set up and solve application problems involving linear equations.
    c. Apply geometric formulas to find the perimeter, circumference, area, and volume of basic geometric figures.
    d. Interpret solutions of application problems in the context of the problem and evaluate the reasonableness of the solutions. Write solution in complete sentences, including units.
    e. Solve applications using systems of equations.

    7. Quadratic equations
    a. Solve quadratic equations by factoring.
    b. Solve applications using factorable quadratic equations.

    8. General Content
    a. Perform all the work of the course without a calculator, except as noted below.
    b. Use a calculator to: find decimal approximations of square roots, evaluate exponents, evaluate expressions by using the order of operations correctly, and evaluate numerical solutions to application problems.
    c. Read and interpret graphs, charts and tables.
    d. Link algebraic, numeric, verbal, and graphical solutions with each other, as appropriate.
    e. Use estimation to approximate solutions and to determine the reasonableness of solutions to problems.
    f. Write solutions in the context of the problem in complete sentences, including units. Use mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly.
    g. Clearly communicate methods of solutions.
    h. Participate actively and responsibly in course activities.
  
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    MATH 077 Prep for College Math (5 credits)



    Course Description
    An exploration of mathematics concepts and activities intended to increase the exposure, abilities, confidence and motivation to learn further mathematics. Topics include Integer arithmetic, algebra, including formulas, solving equations, graphing, exponents and square roots, dimensional analysis, experiential activities, math explorations.

    Student Outcomes
    A.  Students will demonstrate the ability to use mathematical skills (e.g. computation, use of mathematical symbols, using formulas, equations and algorithms, creating and analyzing graphical representation of data) that support mathematical understanding. 


    B.  Students will complete experiential activities to increase confidence with, and understanding of, math concepts that are frequently discussed abstractly in math and science texts.”


    C.  Students will analyze real-world situations incorporating any appropriate math and effectively communicate the results. 


    D.  Students will complete inspirational activities to broaden their view of math, mathematicians, scientists, or contemporary problems researchers are trying to solve.
  
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    MATH 091 Math Review (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Math review

  
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    MATH 096 Intermediate Algebra in Context (7 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement, or MATH 054  with at least a 2.0, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course integrates numeracy, proportional reasoning, algebraic skills, and functional reasoning. Students will represent quantitative relationships in multiple ways in order to solve problems from a variety of authentic contexts. Linear and exponential functions, along with logarithms and radicals will be studied and applied. Modeling and interpreting quantitative data is emphasized.

    Student Outcomes
    Numeracy
    1. Demonstrate operation sense by communicating in words and symbols the effects of operations on numbers. Apply the correct order of operations in evaluating expressions and formulas.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the magnitude of real numbers represented in many forms (fractions, decimals, scientific notation, square roots of numbers) by ordering and comparing them in mathematical and real-world contexts.
    3. Estimate results in appropriate contexts, using appropriate precision; use estimation to detect errors and evaluate the reasonableness of answers.
    4. Use dimensional analysis to convert units, rates, and ratios from any given units to other units. Include conversions among and between U.S. and metric units using a variety of metric prefixes.
    5. Demonstrate measurement sense by determining the sizes of objects and angles using measurements and estimation. Determine perimeter, area, surface area, and volume using appropriate units in both the U.S. and metric systems.
    6. Demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the distribution of data and various mathematical summaries of data (measures of central tendency and of variation).
    7. Read, interpret, and make decisions based upon data from tables and graphical displays such as line graphs, bar graphs, scatterplots, pie charts, and histograms. Given data, choose an appropriate type of graphical display and create it using scales appropriate to the application.

    Proportional Reasoning
    8. Recognize a proportional relationship from verbal, numeric, and visual representations. Link and create verbal, numeric, visual and symbolic representations of the relationship.
    9. Compare proportional relationships represented in different ways, considering units when doing so.
    10. Apply quantitative reasoning strategies to solve real-world problems with proportional relationships using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents as appropriate.

    Algebraic Skills and Reasoning
    11. Distinguish between variables and constants. Represent real-world problem situations using variables and constants. Construct equations to represent relationships between unknown quantities.
    12. Simplify algebraic expressions by using the distributive property, combining like terms, and factoring out a greatest common factor.
    13. Evaluate formulas with multiple variables in a variety of contexts, including science, statistics, geometry, and financial math. Solve simple formulas for a specified variable.
    14. Distinguish between expressions and equations and apply appropriate methods to each.
    15. Solve linear equations in one variable, including problems involving the distributive property and fractions.
    16. Construct inequalities to represent relationships, solve simple and compound inequalities in one variable, represent solutions using interval notation, and interpret solutions in the context of the situation.
    17. Use basic exponent rules to simplify expressions, including those with negative exponents.
    18. Solve basic power equations of the form xn = b using radicals.
    19. Use the Pythagorean Theorem when appropriate in problem situations.

    Functional Reasoning
    20. Translate problems from a variety of contexts into mathematical representation and vice versa (linear, exponential, simple quadratics).
    21. Describe the behavior of common types of functions using words, algebraic symbols, graphs, and tables. Include descriptions of the dependent and independent variables.
    22. Identify when a linear model is reasonable for a given situation and, when appropriate, formulate a linear model. In the context of the situation interpret the slope and intercepts and determine the reasonable domain and range.
    23. Determine the exponential function for a situation when given an initial value and either the growth/decay rate or a second function value. Interpret the initial value and growth rate of an exponential function. Include compound interest as one application.
    24. Translate exponential statements to equivalent logarithmic statements, interpret logarithmic scales, and use logarithms to solve basic exponential equations.
    25. Use functional models to make predictions and solve problems.

    General Skills
    26. Extract relevant information from complex scenarios. Obtain any necessary additional information from outside sources. Synthesize the information in order to solve problems and make decisions.
    27. Identify which mathematical skills to use and then apply them in diverse scenarios and contexts.
    28. Clearly communicate solution processes. Write solutions in the context of the problem in complete sentences, including units. Use mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly.
    29. Use technology appropriately including calculators and computers.
  
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    MATH 098 Intermediate Algebra for Precalculus (5 credits)



    Prerequisite Satisfactory placement test score, instructor permission, or completion of MATH 077 or MATH 096 or equivalent.

    Course Description
    Algebraic skills, concepts, and applications​ needed for precalculus, including quadratic, polynomial, rational, and radical expressions and equations, and systems of linear equations.

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Evaluate and relate functions expressed as graphs, tables, or formulas, including using standard function notation, state the domain and range of these functions, and identify and graph the basic toolkit functions.
    2.  Manipulate and simplify quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational expressions, using appropriate properties and algebraic techniques.
    3.  Solve quadratic, radical, and rational equations, systems of linear equations, and formulas, using appropriate properties and algebraic techniques.
    4.  Solve application problems, interpret solutions, evaluate their reasonableness and make decisions by extracting relevant information from a scenario, obtaining any necessary additional information from outside sources, identifying and applying the appropriate techniques.
    5. Clearly communicate solution processes, including writing solutions in the context of the problem, including units, using mathematical notation and vocabulary correctly, and using complete sentences when appropriate.
  
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    MATH 111 College Math for Early Childhood Education (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (not all four-year colleges accept this as a QSR)
    Prerequisite MATH 077, MATH 096  or MATH 098  or equivalent with a grade of at least 2.0 or satisfactory placement test score and eligible for ENGL& 101  .

    Course Description
    A course for early childhood educators providing the mathematical foundations for quantitative concepts appropriate for children from birth through Grade 3. Topics include patterns, sequencing, number systems and computation, models for operations, problem-solving strategies, functions, geometry, measurement, and basic concepts of statistics and probability. Methods used are interactive, activity-based, and guided by national and state mathematics education standards. Emphasizes conceptual understanding, connections among topics, and communication of mathematical thinking.

    Student Outcomes
    Problem solving
    1. Apply problem-solving strategies to problem situations, such as the use of models, pattern recognition, working backwards, “guess, check, and revise”, and organized tables.

    Patterns and sequences
    2. Recognize and describe patterns, such as those found in nature, sounds (music, rhythms), pictures, and objects. Create new patterns.
    3. Create sequences of objects or numbers. Recognize and extend existing sequences, including arithmetic and geometric numeric sequences.

    Numeration systems and operations with numbers
    4. Discuss the components and properties of our base 10 number system, another base such as 5, and ancient numeration systems, including symbols used, place value, methods of computation, and advantages and disadvantages of the system.
    5. Describe and apply a variety of cognitive models and concrete materials (manipulatives) to explore, illustrate, and justify quantitative relationships and computational methods.
    6. Apply properties of the real number system to justify reasoning and to solve mathematical and real-world application problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and proportions.
    7. Use number sense, estimation, and reasoning to evaluate the reasonableness of solutions.

    Algebraic expressions, relations, functions, coordinate plane
    8. Solve mathematical and realistic contextual problems by applying algebraic skills using expressions, formulas, linear equations, and inequalities.
    9. Use two-dimensional coordinate geometry to specify locations and describe relationships.
    10. Explore and analyze patterns, relationships, and functions using tables, graphs, and equations.
    11. Describe and analyze rates of change including slope, rate of growth, and speed.

    Geometric shapes, measurement, area, perimeter, volume
    12. Analyze characteristics and properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes. Apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
    13. Build and manipulate representations of two- and three-dimensional objects using concrete models and drawings.
    14. Describe relationships among two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes, including congruence and similarity. Use proportions to solve problems involving similar triangles.
    15. Apply geometric concepts and modeling to solve mathematical and real-world problems.
    16. Recognize measurable attributes of objects. Explore and apply various units and systems of measurement, including nonstandard, U.S., and metric (SI).
    17. Select and use appropriate measurement units, techniques, and tools to find length, perimeter, area, volume, capacity, and weight. Compare and contrast shapes and objects by size.
    18. Determine area, perimeter, and volume of two- and three-dimensional geometric shapes.

    Statistics and probability
    19. Design simple investigations and collect and organize data.
    20. Display data in a variety of ways including graphs and charts.
    21. Determine and analyze measures of center for sets of data (mean, median, mode).
    22. Interpret data by observing patterns and departures from patterns in data displays. Discuss results.
    23. Calculate the empirical probabilities of events after collecting relevant data.
    24. Estimate the theoretical probability of simple events and the likelihood of real world events.

    Connections and Communication
    25. Connect mathematical ideas to the real world.
    26. Recognize how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole.
    27. Communicate mathematical thinking coherently and clearly (using correct vocabulary) to peers, teachers, and others by, for example, leading activities involving the concepts of this course or presenting lessons to the class using appropriate materials.
    28. Collaborate with classmates in order to achieve some of the learning outcomes of this course.
    29. Relate national and state mathematics education standards for Pre-K to Grade 3 to mathematical content of this course.
 

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