2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog 
    
    Nov 28, 2022  
2021-2022 Pierce College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A department prefix is used to identify courses offered at Pierce College. Click on link for a list of prefixes for each department: Course Prefixes  

 

Business

  
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    BUS 279 Personal Finance (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A practical course in managing personal finances. Course will include: budgeting, home ownership, income tax, investments, insurance, wills, and trusts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the importance of personal financial planning.
    2. Develop a system for organizing and maintaining your financial records.
    3. Identify your short-term and long-term personal financial goals.
    4. Identify the major features of the federal income tax system.
    5. Apply the objectives of cash management to assessing your need for cash management products and services.
    6. Identify the personal financial planning process for making consumer purchase decisions.
    7. Identify the most common types of consumer loans and lenders.
    8. Evaluate your automobile needs and determine what you can afford.
    9. Apply the risk management process to developing an insurance plan.
    10. Evaluate the value of the components of a compensation package that includes employee benefits.
    11. Identify realistic investment goals that are consistent with your financial plan, risk tolerance, and life stage.
    12. Define the basic terminology used by security investors.
    13. Discuss the benefits and costs of investing in mutual funds.
    14. Reflect upon and estimate your retirement income needs.
    15. Identify your life insurance needs.
    16. Discuss the process of estate planning.
  
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    BUS 380 Project Management - Feasibility and Life Cycle (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program.

    Course Description
    Today’s businesses are increasingly project-based in their operations. This course orients students to a project management life-cycle framework. It helps students understand the importance of coordinating the planning, management, organization, and communication of assets to meet organizational goals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the fundamentals of project management within a systems framework.
    2. Apply project management fundamentals to project-related activities such as selecting projects, prioritizing tasks, managing budgets, managing teams, planning and allocating resources, and resolving project issues quickly.
    3. Explain the role of strategic leadership and decision-making in the success of project management.
    4. Analyze types of decisions a project manager typically makes and how these affect cross-functional teams.
    5. Analyze effective project manager characteristics with special attention to diverse teams, groups, and stakeholders and evaluate how these impact project performance.
    6. Apply leadership, strategic business management, and project management tools to a real-world project.
    7. Create a budget for a project and provide a schedule for the project phases.
    8. Create a project-management evaluation rubric to assess project outcomes and improve future processes.
  
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    BUS& 101 Introduction to Business (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly BUS 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    This course surveys major functions of business – operations, marketing, and finance – within local, national, and international contexts. It examines the nature of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in a free market economy.

    Student Outcomes
    Describe the different elements of capitalism, socialism, communism, and mixed economies and how these function in markets.​
    Describe how the role of competition, government involvement, ethics, and culture impact economic systems.
    Describe how elements of the global economy such as labor, capital, trade, and natural resources, influence business activities.
    Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the various legal structures for businesses.
    Discuss the role of business in the free enterprise system.
    Analyze the major functions of business such as operations, marketing, and finance and their role in meeting organizational goals. 
    Analyze the role of standards in business functions and how these relate to customer expectations.
  
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    BUS& 201 Business Law (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Social Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly LAW 206 - CCN

    Prerequisite ENGL& 101 , or BTECA 115 , with a 2.0 grade or better or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Study of laws, legal processes, court and legal systems related to business, including contracts, dispute resolution, and operation-related laws. ​

    Student Outcomes
    1. Summarize the sources and hierarchy of American law.
    2. Outline the court system for resolving disputes, and alternatives to litigation.
    3. Summarize the various types of contracts, the elements of contract formation, and defenses to enforcement as well as remedies for breach.
    4. Identify laws protecting creditors, debtors and consumers.
    5. Explain circumstances where business issues raise the need for professional legal advice or raise ethical issues.
    6. Summarize aspects of property law, real, personal and intangible, relevant to business.
    7. Identify key rules of law that can result in significant civil or criminal liability to businesses, including modern employment law issues.

Business Information Technology

  
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    BTECA 100 Business Keyboarding: Key the Alphabet by Touch (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Students use a computer keyboarding program to learn to keyboard by touch with correct fingering using proper ergonomic position at a computer workstation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Type alphabetic text at a minimum rate of 15 wpm for 2 minutes with no more than 4 errors.
    2. Demonstrate typing by touch with correct fingering position on the alphabetic and service keys.
    3. Demonstrate proper ergonomic position at a workstation.
  
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    BTECA 101 Business Keyboarding:Key Numrs&Symbols by Touch (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Students use a computer keyboarding program to learn to key numbers and symbols by touch with correct fingering and proper ergonomic position at a computer workstation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Type alphanumeric text, numbers, and symbols at a minimum rate of 17 wpm for 3 minutes with no more than 5 errors.
    2. Demonstrate correct keyboarding technique including typing by touch with correct fingering.
    3. Demonstrate proper ergonomic position at a computer workstation.
  
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    BTECA 102 Keyboard Development & Basic Bus Doc Formatting I (1 credit)



    Course Description
    This course assists students with continuous development of keyboard speed, accuracy and technique while simultaneously applying keyboarding skills to create basic business documents. 

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Student will demonstrate an improvement in keyboarding speed and accuracy with a minimum of 16 wpm.
    2.  Student will key, format, proofread, and edit basic business documents while being introduced to MS Word tools.
  
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    BTECA 103 Keyboard Development & Basic Bus Doc Formatting II (1 credit)



    Course Description
    This course assists students with continuous development of keyboard speed, accuracy and technique while simultaneously applying keyboard skills to create basic business documents. 

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Student will demonstrate an improvement in keyboarding speed, achieved in BTECA 102, and accuracy ranging from 1-3 words per minute to a minimum of 21 wpm.
    2.  Student will key, format, proofread, and edit basic business documents while practicing and continuing to learn additional basic MS Word formatting features.
  
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    BTECA 104 Keyboard Development & Adv Bus Doc Formatting III (1 credit)



    Course Description
    This course assists students with continuous development of keyboard speed, accuracy and technique while simultaneously applying those skills to creating advanced business documents. 

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Student will demonstrate an improvement in keyboard speed, achieved in BTECA 103, and accuracy ranging from 1-3 words per minute to a minimum of 31 wpm.
    2.  Student will key, format, proofread, and edit advanced business documents while practicing and continuing to learn intermediate to advanced MS Word tools.
  
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    BTECA 105 Keyboard Development & Adv Bus Doc Formatting IV (1 credit)



    Course Description
    This course assists students with continuous development of keyboard speed, accuracy, and technique while simultaneously applying those skills to the creating of advanced business documents. 

    Student Outcomes
    1.  Student will demonstrate an improvement in keyboard speed, achieved in BTECA 104, and accuracy ranging from 1-3 words per minute to a minimum of 40 wpm.
    2.  Student will key, format, proofread, and edit advanced business documents while practicing and continuing to learn additional advanced MS Word tools.​
  
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    BTECA 106 PC Operating System: Exploring and File Management (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Introduction to Windows Operating System, Windows applications, and File Explorer to manage files.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the Windows Desktop, Taskbar, Ribbons, Dialog Boxes, and Start Menu.
    2. Demonstrate ability to open and close various windows and applications.
    3. Demonstrate ability to move between open windows.
    4. Create, move, and rename files and folders.
    5. Identify files using file search procedures and File Explorer.
    6. Identify screen images to capture and paste using appropriate tools.
    7. Demonstrate proficiency with Internet search engines to locate and manage information.
    8. Demonstrate the use of the “HELP” feature to locate information.
  
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    BTECA 107 PC Operating System: Customizing Windows/Internet Basics (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Customizing the Windows desktop for personal use, checking security and maintenance settings, and using the Web browser to locate and manage information.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Customize the desktop for optimal personal use including sound and screen brightness.
    2. Manage information using Internet search engines.
    3. Review browser history, clear browsing data, and print Web pages.
    4. Search for applications and adjust settings using the Windows Control Panel.
    5. Review Window’s security, status, and maintenance settings.
  
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    BTECA 110 Microsoft Word: Prepare and Edit Documents (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 200A

    Course Description
    Students learn beginning-level features of Word to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the first class in a series to prepare students for the MOS Exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply skills and concepts to create documents in MS Word to optimize workflow.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to use the Help feature of MS Word.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to modify the appearance of documents in MS Word.
  
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    BTECA 111 Microsoft Word: Format Pages and Objects (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 200B

    Course Description
    Students will learn intermediate-level features of Word to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Exam objectives. This is the second class in a series to prepare students for the MOS Exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply formatting features in MS Word to enhance appearance and readability of paragraphs and pages.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in creating and editing shapes and images.
  
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    BTECA 112 Microsoft Word: Print, Tables and Customization (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 200C

    Course Description
    Students will learn advanced-level features of Word to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the third class in a series to prepare students for the MOS Exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to effectively manage MS Word documents in relation to other programs.
    2. Apply templates and themes in MS Word to enhance readability.
    3. Create documents with formatted tables to display organized information.
  
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    BTECA 113 Microsoft Word: Track Changes, Editing and Design (1 credits)



    Course Description
    Students will learn advanced-level features of Word to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the fourth class in a series to prepare students for the MOS exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply advanced MS Word features in order to increase clarity and navigation within academic and workplace documents.
    2. Apply design features to enhance appearance and readability.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to effectively apply and use review features for editing and revising among office team members.
  
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    BTECA 115 Business English I (5 credits)



    Formerly BUS 105

    Course Description
    A course designed to strengthen the student’s writing skills through the study of grammar, sentence structure, paragraph development, and punctuation. The student will compose clear and concise business documents, such as memos, e-mail, and messages.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use English language structures, including conventions of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and diction in response to various office settings and audiences.
    2. Demonstrate written communication skills in response to various work environments.
  
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    BTECA 116 Business English II (3 credits)



    Formerly BUS 106

    Prerequisite BTECA 115  with a grade of 2.0 OR placement into ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    Study and practice the writing process to create effective business memoranda, letters, and short reports. The student will continue to build a strong business vocabulary and fluency.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Prepare effective business documents using formatting, grammar, spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and vocabulary in response to various business settings and audiences. 
    2. Proofread and edit written business documents to meet communication objectives and style guide conventions.
    3. Communicate effectively, efficiently, accurately, and concisely appropriate to various business settings.
  
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    BTECA 117 Business Mathematics (5 credits)



    Formerly BUS 107

    Course Description
    In this course you will apply math concepts and use tools and strategies to solve common business problems including discounts, markups, depreciation, credit purchases, and inventory management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the key components of a formula in order to explain how they are used in solving business problems.
    2. Critically evaluate business word problems by using appropriate mathematical formulas in order to solve for the requested information.
    3. Solve equations by completing correct algebraic processes.
    4. Interpret data from applicable tables (for example, present value/compound value) to solve business related problems.
    5. Evaluate solutions for reasonableness.
    6. Construct equations from information given in real-world business scenarios.
  
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    BTECA 121 Microsoft Excel: Prepare Basic Worksheets (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 210A

    Course Description
    Student learn beginning features of Excel to align with the MOS objectives. This is the first class in a series to prepare students for MOS exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply basic skills to organize data in a spreadsheet.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to use the Help features of MS Excel.
    3. Create basic formulas using mathematical functions and operators.
  
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    BTECA 122 Microsoft Excel: Manage Workbooks (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 210B

    Course Description
    Students learn intermediate-features of Excel to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the second class in a series to prepare students for the MOS exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in applying skills and concepts to create workbooks and worksheets for personal and professional applications.
    2. Manage workbooks by integrating data and formulas between worksheets.
    3. Apply formatting features to workbooks and worksheets in MS Excel.
  
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    BTECA 123 Microsoft Excel: Financial Formulas and Charts (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 210C

    Course Description
    Students learn advanced-features of Excel to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the third class in a series to prepare students for the MOS exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to apply advanced format features to enhance worksheet data.
    2. Apply financial formulas to create meaningful reports for business use.
    3. Create charts to manipulate and showcase key business data and increase readability for business reports.
  
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    BTECA 124 Microsoft Excel: Manage Tables and Import Data (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Students learn advanced-features of Excel to align with the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) objectives. This is the fourth class in a series to prepare students for the MOS exam.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply advanced MS Excel features in order to increase clarity and navigation within academic and workplace worksheets.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to manipulate data within a worksheet.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to import data and text files from other programs.
  
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    BTECA 130 Microsoft PowerPoint: Create and Modify a PowerPoint Presentation (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 225A

    Course Description
    Students study basic principles to create and modify a PowerPoint presentation. This is the first class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply skills and concepts to create presentations in MS PowerPoint for business and academic presentations.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to use the Help features of MS PowerPoint.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to modify the appearance of presentations in MS PowerPoint.
  
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    BTECA 131 Microsoft PowerPoint: Visual Elements & Themes (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 225B

    Course Description
    Students learn intermediate-level features of PowerPoint to align with Office 365. This is the second class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in applying skills and concepts to create personal, academic, and workplace documents in MS PowerPoint
    2. Create PowerPoint presentations implementing elements into the slides.
    3. Apply tables, SmartArt, charts, and photo albums in the creation of MS PowerPoint presentations
  
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    BTECA 132 Microsoft PowerPoint: Customize and Share Presentation (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 225C

    Course Description
    Students learn advanced-level features of PowerPoint. This is the final class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to manipulate MS PowerPoint presentations with the use of Slide Masters, Templates, Hyperlinks, and Action Buttons.
    2. Apply custom animation and slide show settings to MS PowerPoint presentations to manage audience interaction with slides.
    3. Effectively import and export presentations for sharing among users.
  
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    BTECA 136 Ten-Key Mastery (1 credit)



    Course Description
    Students use a computer keyboarding program to input data on the keyboard’s ten-key pad by touch with correct fingering using proper ergonomic position at a computer workstation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Enter data on the ten-key pad at 8,000 strokes per hour or greater on a one-minute timing with 95% accuracy.
    2. Demonstrate data entry by touch with proper fingering.
    3. Demonstrate proper ergonomic position at the computer workstation.
    4. Apply data entry skills for employment scenarios.
  
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    BTECA 140 Microsoft Access: Create Tables and Relationships (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 220A

    Course Description
    Students learn beginning features of Access. This is the first class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply skills and concepts to create MS Access databases housing records for business and personal use.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to create and modify tables within an MS Access database.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to create and edit relationships within an MS Access database.
  
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    BTECA 141 Microsoft Access: Create Queries and Forms (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 220B

    Course Description
    Students learn intermediate features of Access. This is the second class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate proficiency in applying skills and concepts to manage data input when creating personal, academic, and workplace databases in MS Access.
    2. Identify the appropriate use of queries, tables, and forms in MS Access Database
    3. Demonstrate the ability to design and modify queries, tables, and forms in an MS Access Database
  
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    BTECA 142 Microsoft Access: Create Reports and Manage Data (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 220C

    Course Description
    Students learn advanced-level features of Access. This is the final class in a series.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate the ability to create reports and mailing labels with database records.
    2. Apply advanced features to maintain and protect records in a database.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to effectively manage data in MS Access and in relation to other programs.
  
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    BTECA 145 Records Management (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 145

    Course Description
    Principles and procedures for records management including storage and retrieval using manual and electronic filing principles.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Differentiate the various methods of records and information management to select the most efficient method for various scenarios. 
    2. Apply filing principles to manual and electronic records storage. 
    3. Apply the basic concepts of electronic databases for the purpose of records management.
  
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    BTECA 160 Business Document Formatting: Basic (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 117A

    Prerequisite BTECA 110 with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Use word processing software to create basic business documents.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Key, proofread, and edit personal business and business letters using correct format.
    2. Key, proofread, and edit business and academic reports.
    3. Use standard proofreader marks to edit copy.
  
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    BTECA 161 Business Document Formatting: Advanced (1 credit)



    Formerly BTECH 117B

    Course Description
    Use word processing software to create advanced business documents.

    Student Outcomes
    A. Key, proofread, format, and edit advanced business documents.
    B. Key, proofread, format, and edit academic reports using a style guide.
    C. Key, proofread, format, and edit resumes, end-notes, and bibliographies.
  
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    BTECA 180 Microsoft Outlook (3 credits)



    Course Description
    This course covers Microsoft Outlook topics to include e-mail, calendar, and tasks with customization and integration of Outlook in a business environment.  

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply skills and concepts to optimize workflow in MS Outlook. 
    2. Demonstrate proficiency with customizing the tools in MS Outlook.
  
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    BTECA 205 Office Procedures (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A course designed for students to learn and practice necessary skills for employment in today’s office.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate competency of appropriate skills expected in a variety of office and team environments. 
    2. Manage productivity through time management and prioritization of work-related tasks. 
    3. Research various career postions and organizations associated with those careers. 
    4. Exhibit employment readiness through development of job search skills.
  
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    BTECA 245 Cooperative Work Experience I (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Emphasis on relating and applying the skills and attitudes learned in college to the workplace. Students complete a 90-hour internship, working part-time in an office setting related to their chosen Business Information Technology program(s). The students regularly discuss job-related issues. Professional liability insurance is required for this course. Some employers require drug testing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Work a minimum of 90 hours in a professional office position related to the program of study.
    2. Demonstrate and apply skill sets learned throughout the student’s program of study.
    3. Demonstrate appropriate attitudes and work ethics on the job.
  
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    BTECA 246 Cooperative Work Experience II (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students work in an office setting related to their chosen Business Information Technology program(s). Emphasis continues from BTECA 245 on practicing the skills and attitudes learned in BTECA courses. Professional liability insurance required for this course. Some employers require drug testing.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Work in a professional office position for an additional 150 hours beyond the 90 hours for BTECA 245.
    2. Relate recent course instruction to this internship.
    3. Demonstrate job skills specific to student’s BTECH program.
    4. Demonstrate appropriate attitudes and work ethics on the job.
    5. Exhibit personal responsibility for appropriate office behaviors and completion of work tasks in a timely manner.
  
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    BTECA 250 Business Communications (5 credits)



    Formerly BUS 250

    Prerequisite BTECA 115  or ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    This course will benefit you with your career aspirations and goals in the business world and make you more competitive by completing relevant and practical assignments relative to oral and written business communications and research that are required in today’s marketplace.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Create error-free documents using specified formats for letters, emails, reports, etc.
    2. Employ a systematic approach to creating and editing documents.
    3. Produce documents tailored to the audience to meet the intended purpose.
    4. Compose business letters of various purposes such as expressing goodwill, attempting to persuade, or
    conveying a negative message.
    5. Research a topic related to business communications that incorporates academic research and
    primary sources reflected in a written report with visual representation.
    6. Use information ethically and legally.
    7. Utilize researched information to compose and deliver an oral report.
    8. Represent a worldwide business understanding in oral and written communication.
  
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    BTECM 149 Introduction to the Medical Office (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 149

    Course Description
    An interpersonal networking course for medical office students, including discussion, guest speakers, and assignments related to topics such as the medical environment, medical staff, medical ethics and law, and the healthcare-related job market.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe the key events in medical history that have influenced modern day health care.
    2. Demonstrate knowledge of differences among medical practice settings and health care delivery systems.
    3. Discuss the importance of organizational, basic business, communication, and interpersonal skills and medical knowledge required of an Administrative Medical Assistant.
    4. Describe the elements of teamwork that contribute to the effectiveness and efficiency of the medical office.
    5. Examine the rationale for, importance of, and processes related to continuous quality improvement in the medical office including the continual advances in technology.
    6. Summarize essential components of law related to health care and their impact on medical ethical scenarios.
    7. Demonstrate understanding of the basic components and requirements of HIPAA.
    8. Research various professional organizations that offer services and benefits for the Administrative Medical Assistant and related professions.
  
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    BTECM 150 Medical Terminology I (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 150

    Course Description
    Fundamentals of medical terminology, including prefixes, suffixes, root words, and basic rules upon which the student will build a medical vocabulary. Includes basic anatomy and physiology for the medical office worker.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze the various elements of medical terms.
    2. Use basic prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms to build medical terms.
    3. Convert words from singular to plural form.
    4. Correctly identify proper usage of medical terms in context.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the common rules for proper medical term formation, pronunciation, and spelling.
    6. Relate terminology to the names, locations, and functions of the organs in the body systems.
    7. Describe the medical terms that pertain to the whole body, such as body planes, body regions and quadrants, body cavities, and divisions of the back region.
    8. Identify correct terminology for pathological conditions along with diagnostic tests and treatments for the various body systems studied in this course.
    9. Define common terms and abbreviations in medical records related to the systems of the body.
  
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    BTECM 151 Medical Terminology II (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 151

    Prerequisite BTECM 150  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Continuation of BTECM 150 to build on the student’s medical vocabulary by learning advanced terminology and body systems. Includes basic anatomy and physiology for careers in the medical pathway.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze the various elements of medical terms.
    2. Use basic prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms to build medical terms.
    3. Convert words from singular to plural form.
    4. Correctly identify proper usage of medical terms in context.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the common rules for proper medical term formation, pronunciation, and spelling.
    6. Relate terminology to the names, locations, and functions of the organs of the body systems.
    7. Identify correct terminology for pathological conditions along with diagnostic tests and treatments for the various body systems studied in this course.
    8. Define common terms and abbreviations in medical records related to the systems of the body.
  
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    BTECM 244 Medical Office Simulation (3 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 244

    Prerequisite Permission from a Business Information Technology Instructor.

    Course Description
    A capstone service learning course primarily focused on the cumulative application of skills of a medical office assistant including professional networking for future employment.

    Student Outcomes
    A-1 Employ content from previous courses to this course by completing simulation assignments
    B-1 Demonstrate medical office skills: interpersonal communications, records management, written communications, financial administration, and office management.
    C-1 Use of efficient work habits: prioritization, problem solving, and time management.
    C-2 Demonstrate appropriate attitudes toward co-workers, clients, instructors, fellow students, and community members.
    C-3 Demonstrate appropriate work ethic: reliability, punctuality, confidentiality, etc.
    E-1 Research possible job opportunities for future employment through use of social media, professional organizations, internet, etc.
    E-1 Locate and identify possible Administrative Medical Assistant jobs and/or Billing/Coding positions
    E-2 Produce a professional cover letter for possible Administrative Medical Assistant positions.
    E-3 Produce a professional resume for possible Administrative Medical Assistant positions.
    F-1 Explain impact of service learning project through reflection assignment
  
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    BTECM 250 Medical Claims and Insurance Management (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 250

    Course Description
    Emphasis on the production of the medical insurance forms required for insurance billing, including an introduction to CMS-1500 and UB-92. Includes completion of medical claim forms for (includng, but not limited to): Medicare, Medicaid, private/commercial insurance, Blue Cross, VA, and Worker’s Compensation.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe basic information regarding major insurance programs and federal health care legislation.
    2. Display basic knowledge of ICD-10-CM, CPT, and HCPCS coding and define the differences between these systems.
    3. Extract information from case studies to accurately complete the appropriate insurance claim form or forms.
    4. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of electronic claims submissions and the safeguards that need to be in place to ensure confidentiality.
    5. Explain the impact of coding compliance and clinical documentation on health care settings.
  
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    BTECM 254 CPT Coding (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 254

    Course Description
    Basic procedural coding for medical office and hospital billing.  Students will learn the American Medical Association’s Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding system and how to legally and ethically apply the system to various healthcare settings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the purpose and difference of the CPT and HCPCS Level II code books.
    2. Apply coding conventions and guidelines when assigning procedure codes.
    3. Explain how the levels of Evaluation and Management (E/M) services are determined.
    4. Evaluate the medical record to assign the appropriate CPT, HCPCS, and International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) codes.
    5. Utilize the various appendices of the CPT manual to complete a task.
    6. Apply correct coding modifiers.
  
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    BTECM 255 Diagnosis Coding (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 255

    Course Description
    In this course students will learn basic diagnosis coding for medical office and outpatient hospital billing using the current International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) publication and guidelines.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate accurate and thorough coding by applying the official ICD-10 guidelines.
    2. Explain the importance of accurate diagnostic coding in relation to quality of care, medical necessity, and reimbursement.
    3. Verify that documentation supports the appropriate diagnosis coding and has been obtained from valid sources.
    4. Describe the purpose of the ICD-10-CM code set.
  
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    BTECM 256 Advanced Coding and Reimbursement (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 256

    Prerequisite BTECM 254  and BTECM 255  with a grade of at least 2.0.

    Course Description
    Advanced application of both diagnosis and procedural outpatient coding as well as the business of coding and billing. Students build their coding knowledge and skill through intensive coding practice and practical experience using the International Classification of Diseases, Current Revision, Clinical Modification, Current Procedural Terminology, and Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System manuals and applying those concepts to complex coding scenarios.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate accurate and thorough diagnosis (ICD-10), procedural (CPT), and supplies (HCPCS) coding through simulation and scenarios.
    2. Apply coding guidelines to properly sequence diagnosis, procedure, and supplies codes.
    3. Synthesize the various resources and tools used by coding professionals.
    4. Demonstrate effective professional communication with payers, healthcare providers, and patients.
  
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    BTECM 257 Electronic Health Records (5 credits)



    Formerly BTECH 257

    Course Description
    This course will prepare students for the management of health information through the use of electronic health records. Students will complete common work tasks and practice data entry while creating a variety of electronic medical records (EMRs) in both inpatient and outpatient settings using training software. The course will also provide background on existing and evolving government driven standards and regulations as they apply to the healthcare environment.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify the basic characteristics of healthcare delivery organizations including various roles and challenges.
    2. Identify the major healthcare regulatory bodies and their functions in the U.S.
    3. Identify attributes and functions of Electronic Medical Record/Electronic Health Record (EMR/EHR) and the benefits of a well-maintained EMR/EHR.
    4. Enter and revise data in a simulated EMR/EHR to include patient data, orders, codes for billing, and procedure reports.
    5. Explain how current and emerging technologies have impacted and may continue to effect consumer health.
    6. Outline the principles and methodologies underlying standards for healthcare data interchange regulations and practices.
    7. Identify the main issues and discuss trends in healthcare privacy, administrative safeguards, and security management.

Business Management

  
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    MNGT 130 Customer Relationship Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to customer relationship management. Topics include customer behavior, customer assessment, effective communication, serving the customer in a diverse environment, and developing and maintaining a relationship with customers.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Employ customer- focused behavior including appropriate greeting, active listening, and questioning to uncover needs. Develop and utilize creative solutions and proactive problem-solving/ decision making to meet customer needs.
    2. Analyze and explain the various elements of a customer service culture including the following: service philosophy, organizational mission, policies and procedures, customer feedback techniques, employee behavior, roles and expectations.
    3. Develop and apply strategies for communicating with different behavioral and personality styles.
    4. Identify and apply appropriate telephone customer service skills including answering the phone, transferring the customer, using call waiting and voice mail, and following up with customers.
    5. Develop and apply strategies for handling difficult customers’ encounters including dissatisfied, indecisive, angry, demanding, rude, and talkative customers.
    6. List and apply cultural factors that impact customer service in a diverse business environment.
    7. Develop an action plan for service recovery following a breakdown in quality, quantity, or type of product service delivered.
    8. Design and evaluate market research tied to customer service. Analyze and present results in a professional manner.
  
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    MNGT 136 Web Usability & E-Commerce (5 credits)



    Prerequisite BUS 135  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Students will explore the concepts of website usability, create a foundation in user-centered design, information visualization, and concepts of interactive design and understand the role of users, business and technology. They will study the evolution of usability, map out the design process and consider design concepts such as navigation, presentation, etc. Students will also identify and explore methods and tools typically used by businesses to test and analyze website usability and online user behavior.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Investigate user-centered design principles and apply appropriate strategies and techniques to maximize user experience on web pages and e-commerce sites.
    2. Use industry standard tools, applications and strategies to test, measure and analyze website usability, online user behavior and information design effectiveness.
    3. Design and evaluate wireframe models of websites and e-commerce applications for maximum user interaction, accessibility, and satisfaction.
    4. Research and discuss knowledge, skills and abilities required for professional positions in the fields of user-centered design, website usability and e-commerce user experience for business.
  
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    MNGT 137 Independent Contracting (3 credits)



    Course Description
    An introduction to running one’s own business. Students will explore the techniques and responsibilities for successfully managing an independent career.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify a legal business format to use and support decision.
    2. Explain requirements for setting up basic bookkeeping, including taxes, expenses and purchases.
    3. Review contracts for critical points, such as payment schedule, delivery requirements, rights and responsibilities, and propose reasonable amendments.
    4. Create a time management plan that includes effective amounts of time for completing professional activities and business operations.
    5. Analyze own strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) to improve marketability.
    6. Create a marketing plan of action, including networking and social media.
    7. Create a written viable business plan using external research.
  
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    MNGT 138 Information Design for Business (5 credits)



    Prerequisite BUS 135  with a grade of 2.0 or greater or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Students will explore techniques and strategies for effective technical writing and writing for the web. They will learn the basic principles of information design for business and marketing and analyze how users read and process information on the web.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use web, multi-media, graphic design and image design tools to develop web-based business and marketing content that results in an engaging and effective user experience.
    2. Develop and analyze targeted business and marketing content strategies that meet expectations of specific user audiences and integrate best practices in information design.
    3. Research and discuss knowledge, skills and abilities required for professional positions in the fields of business information design and user experience for the web and social media.
    4. Identify what makes video and podcasting mediums effective for digital marketing.
  
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    MNGT 139 Social Media Digital Content for Business (5 credits)



    Prerequisite BUS 135  with at least a 2.0 grade. 

    Course Description
    Students will explore the creation of effective and engaging digital content including the tools, strategies, and characteristics required to help consumers take action. They will look at the advantages and constraints of different types of communication mediums, and issues of ownership and copyright. They will explore software applications and apply fundamental graphic and information design principles to create effective marketing content. They will create a marketing portfolio.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Produce effective and appropriate marketing content for both print and web mediums.
    2. Research and discuss knowledge, skills, and abilities required for professional positions in the fields of social media content and digital content creation.
    3. Plan and develop effective and engaging digital content for business that is appropriate for distribution on multiple social media platforms.
    4. Evaluate and propose strategies for delivering effective marketing messages and business content for the web and social media channels.
  
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    MNGT 141 Professional Portfolio (3 credits)



    Prerequisite BUS 134  and MNGT 138  with at least a 2.0 grade in each of these classes, and 15 credits minimum of completed college-level credits or a certificate or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    This course is a marketing portfolio creation experience. Students will choose a portfolio platform and assemble and present a broad-based selection of significant student work for evaluation by the instructor, peers, and industry experts.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assemble a broad-based selection of significant work examples and present it publicly in a digital portfolio format.
    2. Create a professional career video or multimedia presentation that demonstrates knowledge, skills and abilities developed in a college program of study.
    3. Communicate an effective personal brand based on core values and professional best practices to an appropriate audience in a student’s chosen career or industry.
  
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    MNGT 182 Creative Sales and Customer Relationship Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    In the workplace today, we need to know how to meet/exceed internal and external customer expectations and engage in the selling process. This course gives students the tools for successful workplace customer engagement leading to customer loyalty. It also trains the selling process which is used to sell products, services, and ideas.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and apply the various elements of the sales process including pre-approach, prospecting, approaching, recognizing the problem, the presentation, handling objections, closing the sale, and following up with the customer.
    2. Analyze and explain the various elements of a customer service culture including the following: service philosophy; organizational mission, policies, and procedures; customer feedback techniques; employee behavior, roles, and expectations.
    3. Develop and apply strategies for communicating across cultures with different behavioral and personality styles.
    4. Develop and apply strategies for handling difficult customer encounters including dissatisfied, indecisive, angry, demanding, rude, and talkative customers.
    5. Develop and deliver effective professional oral presentations.
    6. Develop a manual that demonstrates effective sales and customer service principles.
    7. Explain basic ethical standards in a professional environment.
  
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    MNGT 186 Professional Development (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Develop practical skills and techniques for the world of professional employment. Students will learn strategies to increase workplace effectiveness.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Students will construct a competitive resume, cover letter, reference sheet, and application in order to effectively describe their skills and experience and be optimally positioned to achieve their career goals.
    2. Students will strategically expand their professional networks through a variety of methods (personal contacts, course connections, social media, etc.), evaluating each method for impact and potential.
    3. Students will demonstrate professionalism in work quality and on-time performance.
    4. Students will construct and execute personal action plans that outline the steps needed to improve workplace skills.
    5. Students will develop education, career path, and professionalism action plans that include SMART goals.
    6. Students will create a portfolio that demonstrates skill sets to perspective employers and use tools to share the portfolio using current technology.
  
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    MNGT 275 Introduction to Visual Promotion (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Provides the student with a working knowledge of planning, creating, and implementing visual promotion including advertising, print media, visual display, and special promotions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Analyze and explain social and ethical concerns with traditional and new media.
    2. Use appropriate vocabulary of visual display and promotion while explaining interrelationships of promotional components including web design, social media, advertising campaigns, special promotions, visual displays, and printed materials.
    3. Identify and demonstrate the use of the elements and principles of design in visual promotion.
    4. Identify and explain various target markets for specific products or services including analysis of business image as it relates to customer attraction and sales promotions in order to demonstrate knowledge of a cohesive visual promotion plan.
    5. Develop promotional plans using promotional components including: branding, budgeting, marketing, and cooperative advertising for specifically identified business structures and target markets.
    6. Design and produce visual materials for a promotional press kit including development of logo, letterhead, business card, print advertising, direct mail brochure, special promotion items, media kit, and online presence plan.
  
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    MNGT 276 Employment Law: Human Resource Legal Issues (5 credits)



    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in ENGL& 101 .

    Course Description
    Overview of major common employment-related laws, workplace legal issues, statutory, and regulatory concepts governing the employment relationship, and development of skills supporting legal actions pertaining to that relationship.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use common law concepts to explain:
    a. under what circumstances employment relationships begin
    b. the torts most often accompanying those relationships, and
    c. how those relationships typically terminate under both tort and contract law.
    2. Identify the major federal and state administrative agencies regulating employment, delineating:
    a. their authority to regulate employment,
    b. the processes they use in performing those regulatory functions, and
    c. the offices and officials within those agencies who interact with outside entities in order to resolve employment-related matters.
    3. Discuss and explain major federal and state statutes of conditions of employment, together with related regulations, as applied by the courts regarding :
    a. discrimination based on a variety of cultural traits, such as gender, age, race, religion, national origin, and ability, and including sexual harassment and affirmative action
    b. safety, including payment to workers for job-related injuries, and
    c. compensation and public policy issues, such as overtime and child labor.
    4. Analyze significant federal and state statutes, together with related regulations, as applied by the courts to the establishment and administration of retirement trusts.
    5. Examine major federal and state statutes, together with related regulations, as applied by the courts to the labor-management relationship, including the establishment and operation of unions and the negotiation and administration of collectively bargained agreements.
    6. Demonstrate, relative to initiating, maintaining, and defending against legal actions pertaining to employment matters, the ability to:
    a. gather and organize relevant, reliable information, and
    b. prepare the forms typically required.
  
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    MNGT 282 Principles of Marketing (5 credits)



    Course Description
    A study of the business activities concerned with the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate an understanding of what marketing is, what constitutes a marketing plan, and an understanding of the marketing concept.
    2. Conduct research to develop a marketing strategy. The research will consider such issues as demand, competition, environmental climate, resources, distribution factors, ethical standards, and political and legal constraints.
    3. Develop a written marketing plan, as a result of research, that employs an effective and viable marketing strategy.
    4. Describe, explain and present the marketing strategy.
    5. Prepare a written critique of the marketing plan that identifies strengths as well as opportunities for improvement.
  
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    MNGT 283 Principles of Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Principles and practices of management as applied to for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Real world scenarios in business are used to help the student apply principles to contemporary management problems.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Describe management as a process and illustrate what managers do, how they do it, and the tools and techniques utilized in order to effectively utilize management processes.
    2. Explain the role of mission statements, policies, procedures, codes of ethics, codes of conduct within an organization and how they impact managers in order to appropriate utilize each in the workplace.
    3. Engage as a manager including setting goals/objectives, organizing resources, making decisions, delegating, motivating, measuring results, and giving/receiving feedback in order to develop individual managerial skill sets.
    4. Understand and appreciate human differences while managing a project or process in order to facilitate team development.
    5. Describe the dynamics of change, change theory and accurately discuss how a manager would successfully implement change within a team or organization in order to facilitate change in the workplace.
    6. Discuss why Codes of Ethics are important and identify actions that are ethical and benefit the organization, stakeholders and community.
    7. Research and identify reasons diversity is beneficial in the workplace.
    8. Understand and apply practices resulting in meetings that are effective and efficient use of resources.
  
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    MNGT 284 Small Business Planning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in ENGL& 101  and MNGT 282 ; a grade of 2.0 or greater in ECON 110  or ECON& 201 ; a grade of 2.0 or greater in ACCT& 201  or ACCT 101 ; or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    Planning and organizing a small business to include developing a preliminary business plan.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the advantages and disadvantages of small business ownership.
    2. Develop a preliminary business plan including business description, product strategy, legal requirements, market analysis, marketing plan, management team, organizational structure, and financial plan.
    3. Research a small business opportunity using a variety of information sources.
    4. Identify various elements that distinguish a successful business plan from an unsuccessful business plan including professional presentation, comprehensive approach to organizational factors, accurate data, and funding contingencies.
    5. Describe the interdependent relationship of various business functions related to small business including marketing, finance, human resources, and business operations.
  
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    MNGT 289 Work Based Learning (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Students will pursue an organized career path plan by obtaining work experience in their chosen field.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Students will obtain 90 hours of work experience in their field of interest through volunteering, job shadowing, interning, and/or agreeing to be evaluated by their current supervisor.
    2. Students will set workplace learning objectives, develop a plan for accomplishing these objectives, document the learning process, and assess their success in reaching the objectives.
    3. Students will write a career path plan communicating where they want to be in their careers five years in the future and the steps they will take to make it happen.
  
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    MNGT 293 Retailing & Merchandising (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Fundamentals of retail buying and the management of retail inventories. Topics included are important for the contemporary online and offline merchant who is responsible for space productivity, inventory turnover, and profitability.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain the various channels throughout the merchandise supply chain structure.
    2. Perform retail sales computations required of the retail sales environment.
    3. Compare and contrast the different sales formats and ownership options of retail operations.
    4. Analyze interrelationships within the online and offline retail environments considering: business location, traffic patterns, customer demographics, sales volumes, inventory management, and advertising in order to evaluate business models.
    5. Develop and apply productivity measures in order to evaluate merchandising objectives within retail environments including: turnover, stock-to-sales ratios, inventory planning, sales pro forma, space management, and seasonal and promotional opportunities.
    6. Create a hierarchy associated with each retail employee function including basic safety and legal issues related to retail situations.
  
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    MNGT 294 Leading Teams Through Innovation and Change (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students will develop skill sets needed for leading teams and organization through uncertainty – the norm of today’s business environment. These skill sets are relevant for leaders in project, entrepreneurship, and intrapreneurship settings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain and apply leadership principles to effectively meet organizational goals.
    2. Describe and analyze how emotional intelligence impacts leadership effectiveness.
    3. Describe and analyze how power dynamics, organizational politics affect organizational growth.
    4. Apply and analyze organizational learning strategies to improve organizational performance.
    5. Describe and apply effective negotiation strategies to ethically meet organizational goals.
    6. Apply conflict management and negotiation techniques to solve organizational challenges.
    7. Apply and analyze team building, operation, and behavior strategies and factors that influence team effectiveness.
    8. Apply and analyze cross-functional and cross-cultural communication strategies to facilitate effective team development.
    9. Apply and analyze effective coaching and team development strategies through innovation and change.
    10. Apply critical and innovative thinking skills to improve decision-making processes within teams and across organizations to meet organizational goals.
  
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    MNGT 295 Human Resource Management (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Principles, methods, and procedures in human resource management including job analysis, description and classification, employee morale and motivation, labor turnover, selection and placement, rating and promotion, and compensation in conjunction with current government regulations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and describe human resource departmental duties and responsibilities including job analysis, auditing, job design, job description, job specifications, needs analysis, job evaluation, flow chart of a recruitment/selection, and affirmative action best practices.
    2. Analyze current employment discrimination laws, identify factors impeding equal employment and develop a plan for minimizing the impact of these factors within an organization.
    3. Develop training and development plans for a new or under-producing employee.
    4. Compare an organization’s safety and health standards against OSHA and WISHA standards.
    5. Explain the advantages and disadvantages to unionization, identify determinants in union-management relations, and describe a method of reducing labor relations problems.
    6. Analyze an actual performance appraisal system and make recommendations for improvement.
    7. Compare various means of compensation, including incentives and benefits and evaluate how compensation is used to attract and retain employees.
  
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    MNGT 296 Current Trends in Human Resources (5 credits)



    Prerequisite MNGT 295  with at least a 2.0 grade.

    Course Description
    Explores current human resource issues including local, state, and federal labor laws; effective recruitment and selection techniques using behaviorally-anchored structured interview format; training and development strategies using competency-based individual development plans; 360-degree performance review; and how to write employee policy manuals and job descriptions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess issues related to current local, state, and federal labor laws impacting profit, not-for-profit, and government organizations.
    2. Write and facilitate a behaviorally-anchored structured job interview.
    3. Participate in a mock behaviorally-anchored structured job interview as (1) interviewer and (2) applicant.
    4. Assess a position in an organization to define the “soft skills” competencies essential to success in the position.
    5. Design a process and describe accountability standards for successful implementation of individual development plans in organizations.
    6. Write an ADA/EEOC compliant mock employee policy manual containing, at a minimum, a sexual harassment policy, a substance abuse policy, and a policy regarding the employer’s treatment of employees and applicants with disabilities.
    7. Write two mock ADA/EEOC compliant job descriptions, one for an exempt position and one for a non-exempt position.
    8. Prepare a comprehensive training curriculum outline (e.g., for an orientation training program).
    9. Prepare comprehensive questions for, and interview with, a human resources manager to ascertain relevancy and consistency of course content with “real-world” experiences.
  
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    MNGT 298 Work Based Learning (3 credits)



    Prerequisite A grade of 2.0 or greater in MNGT 186  or instructor approval.

    Course Description
    Students will pursue an organized career path plan by obtaining work experience in their chosen field.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Students will obtain 90 hours of work experience in their field of interest through volunteering, job shadowing, interning, and/or agreeing to be evaluated by their current supervisor.
    2. Students will set workplace learning objectives, develop a plan for accomplishing these objectives, document the learning process, and assess their success in reaching the objectives.
    3. Students will write a career path plan communicating where they want to be in their careers five years in the future and the steps they will take to make it happen.
  
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    MNGT 310 Systems Theory and Applied Business Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program.

    Course Description
    This course explores systems theory and its multidisciplinary applications in modern-day management, leadership, and organizational processes and contrasts these to other theoretical orientations. Students will learn the interrelated nature of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling functions of management.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply systems theory in management functions.
    2. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of systems theory in creating a more inclusive decision-making environment.
    3. Compare and contrast systems theory and other theories across various management styles and to day-to-day operational decision making.
    4. Identify a persistent management problem related to issues (such as ethics, law, demographics, automation, or globalization) and apply systems theory to solve the problem.
    5. Using systems theory, evaluate an organization’s hiring, customer service, or marketing practice; and, provide a framework for integrating systems and critical thinking into a managerial decision-making processes.
  
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    MNGT 330 Adaptive Leadership and Organizational Learning (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program.

    Course Description
    This course explores adaptive leadership strategies that mobilize and support diverse teams to work collaboratively, inclusively, and respectfully in order to bring about genuine trust and desired outcomes in the processes and products of their work.

    Student Outcomes
    Analyze management and leadership styles and how these impact organizational behavior and effectiveness.
    Apply systems theory and adaptive leadership in fostering learning organizations.
    Evaluate ethical considerations to inform organizational behavior and actions.
    Analyze the role of socio-emotional intelligence and cultural awareness in effective leadership.
    Analyze challenges of effective organizational communication as sources of conflict, resolution, and development.
    Develop a leadership response that increases organizational capacity to solve complex and systemic problems.
    Evaluate leadership, management, power, influence, authority, and role of organizational learning in meeting organizational goals.
  
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    MNGT 350 Applied Human Resource Development (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program.

    Course Description
    This course provides students with fundamentals of human resource development, especially in the context of industry trends and demographic shifts. It examines the strategic role of the human resource department and the development of organizational strategic planning as well as day-to-day operations. Topics are discussed in the context of legal, ethical, political, and cultural considerations.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Explain national and international labor movements and their impact on business operations.
    2. Describe various human behaviors in organizations and explain the role of management strategies, including motivational theory, to influence individual and organization behavior.
    3. Explain factors for effective and ineffective human resource management practices, especially in the context of cultural complexity.
    4. Apply effective teamwork, leadership, and motivational strategies to diverse organizational settings and evaluate results.
    5. Apply systems theory and economic concepts to analyze managerial considerations in human resource development – especially as they relate to the global economy.
    6. Use analytical tools to assess and evaluate employee benefits concepts and plans in the context of administrative and compliance considerations.
    7. Identify a training need for a local organization of substantial size; design a training program using systems theory and human resource development theory; evaluate strengths and weaknesses.
  
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    MNGT 410 Business Strategy and Decision-Making (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program, college-level math with 2.0 grade or better.

    Course Description
    Businesses face complex problems in our globalized, digital, and diverse world. Some have short-term implications, while others have long-term impacts. It is often difficult to ascertain the degree to which a decision today will determine outcomes long after the decision was made. This course uses systems theory as a framework through which business decisions and strategies are understood. Students will then learn to apply systems thinking and analytical tools to diagnose strategic positions from multiple vantage points, evaluate alternative courses of action, and make criteria-based decisions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use systems theory to analyze organizational decisions with multiple objectives and uncertainties.
    2. Analyze business models and how these affect business functions.
    3. Analyze ethical and legal problems within business situations, choose a resolution, and defend that ethical choice.
    4. Analyze corporate strategies within global, digital, and cultural contexts.
    5. Analyze and evaluate strategic objectives, evaluate trade-offs, uncertainties, and risks.
    6. Evaluate business performance and choose high-value strategic options against known criteria.
    7. Use mathematical and analytical tools to compute decision-making factors.
    8. Explain the role of systematic cognitive biases and traps that operate on individuals and groups and adopt strategies to overcome them.
    9. Create and evaluate a decision-making process to solve a problem that is difficult to solve due to lack of time or data, limited resources, or level of complexity.
  
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    MNGT 420 Marketing for Managers (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program, ECON& 201 , ECON& 202 , and ACCT& 202  with at least a 2.0 grade in each of these classes, college-level math.

    Course Description
    This course prepares marketers to have the skills and knowledge to create marketing plans and deploy marketing communication strategies to effectively communicate, create, and capture value for their organization. It uses systems theory and analytical tools to capture patterns, understand relationships among market variables, and ensure customer-centric performance. A special section on social media explores ethics in modern-day marketing. Students will use a simulation software to explore dynamism of domestic and global markets as well as to examine complexities of capturing value within and across markets.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Apply systems theory in describing the dynamic nature of a marketing phenomenon.
    2. Analyze legal and ethical considerations and expectations in the marketplace with special considerations of manifestations in social media platforms.
    3. Apply various analytical tools to assess marketing variables that inform marketing decisions.
    4. Evaluate marketing concepts in the context of changing environmental conditions, consumer preferences, market opportunities, and changing demographics.
    5. Compute various marketing costs and returns on investment, lifetime customer value, and other marketing metrics and evaluate viability of marketing proposals.
    6. Create a marketing plan that communicates, captures, and creates value for a target market.
    7. Evaluate successful and failed marketing plans and analyze contributing factors.
  
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    MNGT 430 Applied Accounting for Managers (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program, ACCT& 201 , ACCT& 202 , and college-level Math with 2.0 grade or better.

    Course Description
    This course examines accounting practices and how they are used to help managers make good business decisions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Develop current and prospective managerial financial statements.
    2. Analyze managerial financial results and provide recommendations for planning and improvement.
    3. Demonstrate costing and cost-analysis techniques in both manufacturing and service industries.
    4. Analyze the relationship between financial and non-financial information in managerial decision-making.
    5. Analyze and evaluate significance of capital investment decisions in order to determine their long-term profitability.
    6. Clearly and concisely communicate relevant financial and non-financial information so that decision makers can make informed decisions.
    7. Identify ethical accounting issues and apply principles of ethics and civic responsibility to maintain professional and organizational integrity as well as legal compliance.
    8. Apply managerial accounting techniques and analytical tools in the business decision-making process with attention to short- and long-term financial planning and controlling implications.
    9. Conduct a financial analysis of a publicly traded company.
  
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    MNGT 450 Operations and Logistics for Managers (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program, college-level Math with 2.0 grade or better.

    Course Description
    This course surveys the fundamentals of the movement, storage, and management of goods. It integrates strategic leadership, project management, financial management concepts, and analytical tools for decision-making purposes.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using systems theory, explain the role of operations and logistics for an organization.
    2. Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas that might occur in operations and logistics.
    3. Apply tools and techniques to plan, execute, and improve the supply chain.
    4. Analyze the manufacturing operations of a firm and their effect on managerial decision-making.
    5. Using systems theory, apply quality management tools for process improvement.
    6. Apply logistics and purchasing concepts to improve supply chain operations.
    7. Explain and analyze control systems used in operations management in various contexts.
    8. Apply mathematical concepts and analytical tools to calculate metrics for efficient operations and supply chain management.
    9. Apply quantitative and qualitative methods to solve typical make/buy and outsourcing problems.
  
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    MNGT 460 Applied Financial Management (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program, a grade of 2.0 or greater in college-level math and ACCT& 202 .

    Course Description
    This course covers topics in investments and the role of financial decisions at the organizational level. It demystifies financial markets and provides practical knowledge for solving problems and making financial decisions. Case studies, financial documents, and scenarios are primary sources for examining financial management problems and their solutions.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Using systems theory, explain financial markets and the role of financial institutions within and across economic systems.
    2. Describe investments and securities markets (e.g., bonds, equities, derivatives, portfolio theory and risks) and their role in organizational finance.
    3. Explain time value of money, sustainable finance, municipal markets, and quantitative risk management.
    4. Use mathematical, statistical, and other analytical tools to assess business activities and solve financial problems.
    5. Use systems theory to explain complexities of financial decisions and long-term financial commitments – critical components of business success or failure.
    6. Analyze role of competition, technological changes, inflation, interest rates, taxation, foreign exchange rates, global economic uncertainty, and other factors on organizational decision-making.
    7. Apply basic financial management principles in risk management to make sound financial decisions.
    8. Analyze financial scenarios and evaluate possible outcomes.
  
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    MNGT 470 Business Development and Negotiations (5 credits)



    Prerequisite At least a junior standing in a baccalaureate program.

    Course Description
    This course prepares students to adopt an innovative mindset; to recognize, refine, and define value; to find the right partners; and to sell their ideas. Students will develop ethical negotiation and influence-based skills to help progress their ideas and careers.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and analyze problems worth solving.
    2. Apply marketability strategies (oral, written, visual, etc.) and tools (analytics, applications, social media, etc.) to sell ideas.
    3. Apply ethical communication strategies to mobilize people and resources.
    4. Assess market opportunities for the purpose of creating, communicating, and capturing value across diverse stakeholders.
    5. Use ethical negotiation and persuasion principles to achieve personal and organizational objectives.
    6. Demonstrate how and when to make concessions and to avoid self-inflicted negotiation mistakes.
    7. Analyze the role collaborative negotiations play in business relationships.
    8. Develop and evaluate strategies to build endurance, foster authentic confidence, and sustain partnerships over time.
    9. Use creativity and value-based negotiations and ethics-based influence to achieve successful closure and maintain productive, trust-based business and organizational relationships.
  
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    MNGT 490 Strategic Management Capstone (3 credits)



    Prerequisite 2.0 grade or better in each of the following: BUS 380,  ENGL& 235,  MNGT 310 , MNGT 330 , MNGT 410 , MNGT 420 , MNGT 430 , MNGT 450 , and MNGT 460 .

    Course Description
    This course synthesizes major principles in the BAS-ABM program. Students capture course and internship learning into a project to solve a major organizational problem or capture a compelling market opportunity (entrepreneurship) against a framework.

    Student Outcomes
    Use systems theory, adaptive leadership, as well as quantitative and qualitative methods and tools to address an organizational problem or entrepreneurial initiative of substantial scope.
    Measure the cost of a project using economic and accounting principles.
    Analyze the specific and generalized impacts of solution options on affected stakeholders.
    Analyze tradeoffs, assess risks, and weigh mitigation responses of organizational strategies.
    Evaluate project/solution/initiative outcomes and their value using analytical tools.
    Evaluate proposed and alternative solution efficacy using evidence-based principles.
  
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    MNGT 498 Strategic Management Internship (2 credits)



    Prerequisite 2.0 grade or better in each of the following: BUS 380, ENGL& 235, MNGT 310, MNGT 330, MNGT 410, MNGT 420, MNGT 430, MNGT 450, and MNGT 460.

    Course Description
    This course is in conjunction with the BAS-ABM capstone course (MNGT 490). It serves as the work experience component where students add organizational value by applying principles learned during their tenure in the baccalaureate program.

    Student Outcomes
    Complete 60 hours of supervised and documented work experience from a program-approved internship or new responsibilities from an existing work position to meet capstone outcomes.
    Apply advisor-approved and capstone-aligned student outcomes in the design and implementation of an organizational project, solution, or initiative.
    Apply project management, business analysis, and other programmatic tools and principles in the design and implementation of an organizational project, solution, or initiative.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM& 100 Preparatory Chemistry (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    Introductory course in chemistry for students intending to take CHEM& 121 and CHEM& 131. Discussion of basic chemical concepts, including atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, and chemical nomenclature.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize and use chemical symbols for elements and compounds.
    2. Balance simple chemical equations.
    3. Solve problems using units in dimensional analysis including kilo-, centi-, milli- metric prefixes, along with simple English/metric conversions.
    4. Express and manipulate numbers using scientific notation and significant figures.
    5. State why measured quantities need to be expressed using significant figures.
    6. Relate energy changes to chemical equations.
    7. Describe the basic structure of atoms and ions and relate them to their location on the Periodic Table, their charge, and the number of fundamental particles.
    8. Relate physical and chemical properties to the Periodic Table, including metals, non-metals, metalloids, group names, ionic charge, and valence electrons.
    9. Demonstrate an understanding of the basics of chemical bonding including polarity of diatomic molecules.
    10. Demonstrate a working knowledge of inorganic nomenclature.
    11. Describe the states and properties of matter.
    12. Demonstrate an understanding of the mole and Avogadro’s number.
    13. Perform gram/mole conversions and mole/mole stoichiometric calculations.
    14. Make and interpret graphs.
    15. Use chemical vocabulary appropriately.
  
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    CHEM& 110 Chemical Concepts w/ Lab (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 105-CCN

    Course Description
    The relationship of basic chemical concepts to issues in modern society will be discussed. Intended for non-science majors.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Relate fundamental chemical concepts to real world problems.
    2. Discuss how chemistry impacts their daily life.
    3. Describe physical phenomena on a molecular level.
    4. Describe the structure of matter.
    5. Relate energy changes to changes on a molecular level.
    6. Relate physical and chemical properties to the periodic table.
    7. Describe how and why atoms come together to make molecules.
    8. Demonstrate how chemical data is acquired in a laboratory setting.
    9. Connect laboratory experiences to real world applications.
    10. Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    11. Communicate the results of laboratory work.
  
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    CHEM& 121 Introduction to Chemistry (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 101 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 100  with a grade of at least 1.5, high school chemistry or instructor’s permission. Must be eligible for MATH 098 .

    Course Description
    An introduction to general chemistry for health professionals or as chemical background for further studies in chemistry. Topics covered include unit conversions, atomic structures, periodic properties, chemical bonds, basic stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, equilibrium, acid/base chemistry and oxidation/reduction. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use conversion factors as a tool for manipulating units.
    2. Generate conversion factors from available information.
    3. Perform calculations and determine whether the answer is reasonable.
    4. Use basic chemical vocabulary appropriately such as atom, molecule, chemical property, and density.
    5. Relate chemical and physical properties and electron configuration to the position of an element/atom on the periodic table.
    6. Distinguish between ionic and covalent compounds.
    7. Name chemical compounds.
    8. Write formulas of compounds from their names.
    9. Write and balance chemical equations.
    10.Predict chemical formulas using ionic charges and empirical formulas.
    11.Perform stoichiometric calculations using mol/mol and mol/gram relationships.
    12.Describe and explain gaseous behavior.
    13.Describe s and p atomic orbitals and draw the shapes.
    14.Describe the states of matter and the factors that affect the transitions between one state and another.
    15.Explain how intermolecular forces affect the physical properties of matter.
    16.Write chemical equations for reactions which occur in aqueous solutions.
    17.Identify oxidation-reduction reactions.
    18.Perform calculations related to the preparation of solutions involving molarity, gram-percent and dilution.
    19.Complete and balance neutralization reactions.
    20.Identify acids and bases.
    21.Demonstrate an understanding of pH by relating it to hydrogen ion concentration and hydroxide ion concentration.
    22.Describe and explain the formation and function of a buffer system.
    23.Describe and explain the factors that affect the rate of reaction.
    24.Describe the relationship between energy changes and chemical processes.
    25.Describe equilibrium and relate it to Le Chatelier and the size of the equilibrium constant.
    26.Describe and carry out simple experiments.
    27.Use standard laboratory equipment appropriately.
    28.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    29.Use chemical reference material appropriately.
    30.Communicate the results of laboratory work, including calculations and graphs.
  
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    CHEM& 131 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 102-CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 121  with a grade of at least 1.5.

    Course Description
    Continuation of CHEM& 121. The course includes an introduction to organic functional groups and a study of carbohydrates, optical isomerism, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, and metabolism. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Recognize, name and draw the structures of the main organic functional groups.
    2.Name selected organic molecules using International Union of Pure & Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) based on condensed or structural formulas.
    3.Draw structural or condensed formulas from IUPAC names.
    4.Describe the molecular geometry in organic molecules.
    5.Relate physical properties to molar mass, polarity and functional group.
    6.Describe the reactions of organic functional groups and relate them to metabolic pathways.
    7.Identify and explain the reactions that form carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids.
    8.Describe and draw: structural isomers, geometric isomers, stereoisomers.
    9.Differentiate glycosidic linkages, anomerism, metabolic value, and optical rotation between different classes of carbohydrates.
    10.Classify lipids and discuss their physiological importance.
    11.Relate saponification, hydrolysis and esterification to lipids.
    12.Classify amino acids based on their chemical structure.
    13.Relate the structure of polypeptides to the amino acids it contains and to peptide bonds.
    14.Describe the interactions between amino acids as they relate to primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary protein structures and how these are affected by denaturation.
    15.Relate isoelectric point of amino acids to charge, electrophoresis, and zwitterions.
    16.Describe the models of enzyme activity.
    17.Discuss how enzyme activity is affected by pH, temperature, substrate concentration, and enzyme concentration.
    18.Explain the relationship between glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and the fatty acid spiral.
    19.Describe Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) production.
    20.Describe the structure and function of DNA and RNA, and relate them to replication, transcription and translation.
    21.Explain protein synthesis and the impact of mutations on protein synthesis.
    22.Design and carry out experiments.
    23.Use standard laboratory equipment appropriately.
    24.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    25.Use chemical reference materials appropriately.
    26.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
  
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    CHEM& 139 General Chemistry Prep (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 139 - CCN

    Prerequisite MATH 098  with at least a 1.5 grade or placement above MATH 098.

    Course Description
    Designed to introduce the science major student to mathematical and chemical principles needed for a successful experience in their science studies. Includes problem solving, graphs, calculator use, atomic structure, periodic properties, inorganic nomenclature, the mole, balancing equations and stoichiometry.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Exhibit proficiency using a scientific calculator.
    2. Express and manipulate numbers using scientific notation and significant figures.
    3. Recognize the importance of significant figures in measurements.
    4. Apply significant figures to measurements.
    5. Solve problems using units and dimensional analysis including cubed units such as m3 to cm3 and density.
    6. Generate and use conversion factors from available information.
    7. Construct and interpret graphs.
    8. Describe the fundamental organization of the periodic table.
    9. Describe the fundamental differences between the states of matter.
    10. Describe the basic structure of an atom.
    11. Use inorganic nomenclature system including a discussion of the properties of common acids and bases and their pH.
    12. Predict when an ionic or covalent bond will form.
    13. Relate the mass of a substance to the concept of the mole and Avogadro’s number.
    14. Write and balance chemical equations.
    15. Perform mole-mole, gram-gram, percent and theoretical yield calculations from a balanced equation.
  
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    CHEM& 161 General Chem w/Lab I (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 140 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 139  with a grade of at least 1.5 or a year of High School chemistry and MATH& 141  with a grade of at least 1.5 (or may be taken concurrently) or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a three quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers measurements, significant figures, dimensional analysis, fundamentals of atomic structure, stoichiometry, reactions, gas laws, thermochemistry, and an introduction to solutions. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Use conversion factors as a tool for manipulating units.
    2.Generate conversion factors from available information.
    3.Recognize patterns in problem solving and develop a procedure to describe the process.
    4.Perform calculations and determine whether the answer is reasonable.
    5.Use chemical vocabulary appropriately.
    6.Distinguish between ionic and covalent compounds.
    7.Name chemical compounds including acids.
    8.Write chemical formulas from names.
    9.Write and balance chemical equations.
    10.Describe how the principles of solubility are used in identifying ions in solutions.
    11.Calculate concentrations of solutions including molarity, molality, percent, and ppm and perform interconversions between units.
    12.Prepare solutions of appropriate concentrations using solid and stock solutions.
    13.Write molecular and net ionic equations.
    14.Predict the products of precipitation and acid/base reactions.
    15.Predict chemical formulas using ionic charges and empirical formulas.
    16.Perform stoichiometric calculations including limiting reactant, percent yield and solution stoichiometry.
    17.Use the kinetic molecular theory to describe gaseous behavior and the gas laws.
    18.Apply the gas laws in calculations.
    19.Explain the limitations of the ideal gas and the usefulness of van der Waal’s equation.
    20.Recognize when a reaction is exothermic or endothermic with respect to enthalpy and the direction of heat flow.
    21.Recognize and describe the difference between a state function and a non-state function.
    22.Perform calculations based on Hess’s law.
    23.Measure heat of reactions.
    24.Design and perform experiments.
    25.Demonstrate the appropriate use of standard laboratory equipment.
    26.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    27.Use chemical reference materials appropriately.
    28.Use computers to gather and analyze data.
    29.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
  
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    CHEM& 162 General Chemistry w/Lab ll (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite CHEM& 161  with a grade of at least 1.5, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The second quarter of a three quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers bonding theory, molecular structures, states of matter, quantum theory, periodic properties, atomic structure, intermolecular forces and an introduction to the second law of thermodynamics. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe the historical development of atomic theory from Dalton up to the present.
    2.Describe atomic orbitals and draw the shapes.
    3.Describe the wave and particle natures of electrons and appreciate the incongruity of the theories.
    4.Use quantum numbers to describe electron energies.
    5.Relate chemical and physical properties and electron configurations to the positions of an element/atom on the periodic table.
    6.Predict the types of bonding in a compound.
    7.Write Lewis structures for and apply VSEPR theory to various molecules and polyatomic ions.
    8.Predict which hybridized orbits are being used in a given molecule.
    9.Explain chemical bonding in terms of a) Lewis theory, b) valence bond theory – including orbital hybridization.
    10.Predict the polarity of a molecule based on its bonding and shape.
    11.Describe the states of matter and the processes by which matter changes state.
    12.Describe the types of intermolecular forces and relate their strengths to the physical properties of matter.
    13.Describe different types of solids based on the attractive forces and their characteristic properties.
    14.Describe the properties of mixtures including concentration, solubility, and colligative properties.
    15.Calculate concentrations of solutions including molarity, molality, percent, and ppm and perform interconversions between units.
    16.Prepare solutions of appropriate concentrations using solid and stock solutions.
    17.Write molecular and net ionic equations.
    18.Predict the products of precipitation and acid/base reactions.
    19.Predict the spontaneity of reactions based on entropy and free-energy.
    20.Perform calculations using Gibbs free energy equation.
    21.Appreciate the significance of entropy and the 2nd law of thermodynamics.
    22.Design and perform experiments.
    23.Demonstrate the appropriate use of standard laboratory equipment.
    24.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    25.Use chemical reference materials appropriately.
    26.Use computers to gather and analyze data.
    27.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
  
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    CHEM& 163 General Chem w/Lab III (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 160 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 162  with a grade of at least 1.5, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The last quarter of a three quarter sequence in general chemistry for science and engineering majors. The course covers kinetics, equilibrium, oxidation/reduction reactions, acids and bases, slightly soluble salts, and electrochemistry. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Describe and use rate laws pertaining to reactions of different order.
    2.Describe how various factors affect the rate of a reaction and describe the significance of the reaction mechanism.
    3.Describe the condition of chemical equilibrium.
    4.Perform calculations involving equilibrium systems, including acid-base, solubility and equilibria.
    5.Describe the significance of the magnitude of the equilibrium constant.
    6.Apply the principles of Le Chatelier as they apply to equilibrium.
    7.Recognize and describe strong/weak acids and bases.
    8.Describe, predict and calculate the outcomes resulting from interaction of acids, bases, buffers and salts.
    9.Describe how the principles of solubility are used in identifying ions in solutions.
    10.Relate free energy change to equilibrium constants.
    11.Balance oxidation-reduction reactions.
    12.Identify oxidizing and reducing agents.
    13.Differentiate between voltaic and electrolytic processes.
    14.Calculate cell potentials and relate to free energy and equilibrium constant.
    15.Describe and calculate quantitative aspects of electrolysis.
    16.Describe the operating principles of some common batteries, including solid-state batteries and fuel cells.
    17.Practice standard laboratory safety procedures.
    18.Use chemical reference material appropriately.
    19.Use standard laboratory equipment appropriately.
    20.Use computers to gather and analyze data.
    21.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
    22.Complete an individual scientific project involving chemical principles.
    23.Prepare titrations, make calibration curves, prepare solutions, and evaluate the reliability of information.
    24.Describe fundamental aspects of coordination compounds and complex ions.
    25.Describe and identify isomerism in complex ions and coordination compounds.
  
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    CHEM& 261 Organic Chem w/Lab I (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 220 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 163  with a grade of at least 1.5, or instructor’s permission.

    Course Description
    The first quarter of a three quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, designed for science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Structure, nomenclature, physical properties, reactions, and synthesis of the main types of organic compounds. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Discuss covalent bonding from the perspectives of Lewis theory, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory.
    2.List the properties of carbon that enable it to be the fundamental atom in organic chemistry.
    3.Identify constitutional isomers.
    4.Describe the different types of intermolecular interactions and recognize when they are occurring.
    5.Identify the common organic functional groups.
    6.Explain the theoretical basis of infrared spectroscopy.
    7.Identify molecules based on their infrared spectra.
    8.Analyze acid/base reactions from the perspectives of Brønsted-Lowry theory and Lewis theory.
    9.Discuss the dependence of acid/base strength on molecular structure.
    10.Apply fundamental thermodynamic principles to organic chemical reactions.
    11.Apply fundamental kinetics principles to organic chemical reactions.
    12.Name alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, and alcohols according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) rules.
    13.Explain the physical properties of the hydrocarbons.
    14.Discuss the different conformational possibilities for the alkanes and cycloalkanes.
    15.Identify cis/trans isomers.
    16.Write equations for the fundamental reactions of alkanes.
    17.Write equations for the synthesis of alkanes.
    18.Discuss the difference between stereoisomerism and constitutional isomerism.
    19.Discuss the difference between diastereoisomerism and enantiomerism.
    20.Discuss the origin of molecular chirality.
    21.Name chiral molecules according to IUPAC rules.
    22.Explain the ability of some molecules to rotate the plane of plane-polarized light.
    23.Draw three-dimensional representations of organic molecules.
    24.Explain how molecular configurations are determined and how racemic mixtures are resolved.
    25.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for SN2 and SN1 reactions.
    26.Analyze the kinetics and stereochemistry of both bimolecular and unimolecular nucleophilic substitution reactions.
    27.Explain the relative stabilities of carbocations.
    28.Discuss the use of nucleophilic substitution reactions in synthesis.
    29.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for E2 and E1 reactions.
    30.Analyze the kinetics and stereochemistry of both bimolecular and unimolecular elimination reactions.
    31.Predict when a reaction is likely to proceed via the SN2, SN1, E2, or E1 mechanism.
    32.Explain the relative stabilities of alkenes.
    33.Propose syntheses of alkenes and alkynes using elimination reactions.
    34.Predict carbocation rearrangements.
    35.Explain the acidity of terminal alkynes.
    36.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for addition reactions to alkenes.
    37.Explain Markovnikov’s rule.
    38.Propose syntheses using addition reactions.
    39.Predict the products formed upon oxidation of alkenes and alkynes.
    40.Explain the origin of the signal in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
    41.Interpret a proton NMR spectrum in terms of equivalence of protons, shielding of protons, chemical shift, and signal splitting.
    42.Identify compounds based on their proton NMR spectrum.
    43.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    44.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
    45.Use common organic laboratory techniques, including melting point determination, recrystallization, extraction, distillation, and chromatography.
    46.Given a simple outline, develop the procedural detail for accomplishing a laboratory objective.
    47.Purify compounds, separate mixtures, and identify unknown components using standard organic laboratory techniques.
    48.Use chemical reference material appropriately.
    49.Work effectively in groups.
  
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    CHEM& 262 Organic Chem w/Lab II (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 221 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 261  with a grade of at least 1.5, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a three quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, designed for science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Includes Lab.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Interpret a 13C NMR spectrum in terms of chemical shift and number of bound protons.
    2.Identify compounds based on their 13C NMR spectra.
    3.Identify compounds based on their two dimensional NMR spectra.
    4.Explain the function of a mass spectrometer.
    5.Identify compounds based on their mass spectra.
    6.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for a variety of free radical reactions, including radical polymerization reactions.
    7.Explain anti-Markovnikov addition.
    8.Name alcohols, ethers, organohalogen compounds, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, and ketones according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry rules.
    9.Explain the physical properties of alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and aromatic compounds.
    10.Write equations for the synthesis of alcohols from alkenes using acid catalyzed hydration, oxymercuration/demercuration, and hydroboration/oxidation.
    11.Write equations for reactions involving alcohols, including acid/base reactions, the formation and use of mesylates and tosylates, and their conversion into alkyl halides.
    12.Write equations for the synthesis of ethers and the reactions of ethers.
    13.Analyze the structure and reactivity of epoxides.
    14.Explain the use of crown ethers as phase transfer catalysts.
    15.Identify organic redox reactions.
    16.Use organometallic compounds to describe the synthesis of a variety of compounds.
    17.Use resonance to explain the stability of allyl radicals and cations.
    18.Explain the bonding in conjugated unsaturated systems.
    19.Write equations for 1,4-addition reactions of conjugated dienes.
    20.Write equations for the synthesis of cyclic compounds using Diels-Alder reactions.
    21.Identify compounds based on their UV-Vis spectra.
    22.Explain the bonding in benzene and other aromatic compounds.
    23.Predict when compounds will be aromatic.
    24.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
    25.Write equations for the synthesis of a variety of compounds using electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
    26.Using a variety of reactions, write equations for the synthesis of aldehydes and ketones.
    27.Write detailed mechanisms for reactions involving addition to the carbonyl group.
    28.Write equations for the synthesis of a variety of compounds using addition to carbonyl groups.
    29.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    30.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
    31.Design and carry out an experimental procedure to solve a specific problem.
    32.Isolate and characterize natural products.
    33.Synthesize organic compounds.
    34.Use infrared spectral data to analyze organic compounds.
    35.Use chemical reference material appropriately.
    36.Work effectively in groups.
  
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    CHEM& 263 Organic Chem w/Lab III (6 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Natural Sciences with Lab; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly CHEM 222 - CCN

    Prerequisite CHEM& 262  with a grade of at least 1.5, or instructor permission.

    Course Description
    The third quarter of a three quarter sequence in organic chemistry for university transfer, designed for science majors, pre-medical, pre-dental and other pre-professional curricula. Further discussion of the properties and transformations of organic molecules, including biomolecules. Lab included.

    Student Outcomes
    1.Explain the formation of enolate ions.
    2.Write equations for reactions that involve enolate ions.
    3.Predict the products of aldol reactions.
    4.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for additions to alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.
    5.Propose a variety of methods for preparing carboxylic acids.
    6.Write detailed reaction mechanisms for acyl transfer reactions.
    7.Explain the difference in behavior between carboxylic acid derivatives and aldehydes/ketones.
    8.Write equations for reactions involving the synthesis and use of beta-dicarbonyl compounds, including the acetoacetic ester synthesis, the malonic ester synthesis, Knoevenagel condensations, and Michael additions.
    9.Explain the basicity of amines.
    10.Propose a variety of methods for the preparation of amines.
    11.Write equations for a variety of reactions involving amines.
    12.Explain the formation and use of arenediazonium salts.
    13.Propose a variety of methods for the synthesis of phenols.
    14.Explain the acidity of phenols.
    15.Write equations for a variety of reactions of phenols, including nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions.
    16.Identify quinones and describe their use.
    17.Analyze the bonding in the four major classes of biomolecules: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids.
    18.Explain the function of the four major classes of biomolecules.
    19.Explain the physical properties of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, phenols, and the four major classes of biomolecules.
    20.Name carboxylic acids, carboxylic acid derivatives, amines, and phenols using International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry rules.
    21.Explain reports presented in the professional research literature.
    22.Pose a relevant problem, design an experimental protocol to solve it, then carry out the protocol.
    23.Synthesize a variety of organic compounds.
    24.Use spectral data to analyze a variety of organic compounds.
    25.Practice standard laboratory safety precautions.
    26.Communicate the results of laboratory work.
    27.Use chemical reference material appropriately.
    28.Work effectively in groups.

College Success

  
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    COLLG 110 College Success (3 credits)



    Course Description
    Students foster self-efficacy by reflecting on and modifying learning strategies, and applying holistic decision making toward personal, academic, and work goals.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Assess and reflect on interests, values, skills, and strengths in order to continually explore and affirm an education and career pathway.
    2. Navigate and use college resources and services in order to pursue personal, academic, and career goals.
    3. Implement study strategies and self-monitoring habits in order to comprehend, retain, and apply learning.
    4. Engage with peers, instructors, and college community in order to build intercultural relationships that foster personal, academic, and career success.
    5. Assess and develop self-efficacy in order to support success.
  
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    COLLG 112 Trio College Transfer Planning (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Must be enrolled in TRIO.

    Course Description
    Interactive capstone course designed for students to support development of personal and academic skills required for success at a four-year school. Topics include networking, mentoring, overcoming personal life challenges, expanding and expounding on a previous exploration in self-awareness and values clarification, and personal preparation for transition to a four-year college. Students will learn how to select a four-year college, apply for admissions and financial aid and research academic and social support resources at selected colleges.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Exercise critical thinking and written communication skills that will be necessary for success in upper-division coursework
    2. Reflect on educational experiences (both inside and outside of Pierce College) to empower students to confront challenges that may arise at a 4-year college.
    • Portfolio
    • Journal
    • Seminar
    • Class presentations
    • Written evaluations
    • Instructor observation

    3. Determine cultural and social issues that may impact academic success at the 4-year college and develop a plan utilizing empowerment and networking strategies to overcome them.
    • Personal inventories
    • Portfolio
    • Written evaluations
    • Seminar
    • Peer evaluations
    • Class presentations
    • Journal
    • Instructor observation
    • Question & answer session with guest speaker(s)
    • Test

    4. Discuss the role and benefits of a mentor and work with a personal mentor in order to begin developing a network of support at the 4-year college.
    • Personal inventories
    • Written evaluations
    • Question & answer session with guest speaker(s)
    • Journal
    • Portfolio

    5. Develop a portfolio that bridges work here at Pierce to professional/academic aspirations at the transfer institution. The portfolio will also document the student’s preparation for transitioning to a 4-year school.
    • Portfolio
  
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    COLLG 115 Personal and Academic Success (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Students foster self-efficacy by reflecting on and modifying learning strategies, and applying holistic decision making toward personal, academic, and work goals. Students develop habits to impact financial and personal wellness. Students cultivate effective collaboration skills.

    Student Outcomes
    Assess and develop self-efficacy in order to support success.
    Assess and intentionally reflect on their interests, values, skills, and strengths in order to continually explore and affirm an education and career pathway.
    Implement study strategies and self-monitoring habits in order to comprehend, retain, and apply learning.​
     Navigate and use college resources and services in order to pursue their personal, academic, and career goals.
    Engage with peers, instructors, and college community in order to build intercultural relationships that foster personal, academic, and career success.
    Engage in formal and informal collaborative work.
    Assess personal wellness and make changes that positively impact their wellness.
     Analyze the fundamental elements of a budget and make decisions based upon the analysis.

Communication Studies

  
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    CMST 105 Intercultural Communication (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPCH 105

    Course Description
    The examination of the effects of culture upon the process of communication. Using theory and skill development, students are prepared to communicate effectively both within and across cultures.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Define culture.
    2. Explain the importance of cultural study.
    3. Identify characteristics and components of world views.
    4. Identify characteristics of culture communication patterns (low or high context).
    5. Identify phases of culture shock.
    6. Define “world view”.
    7. Explain how cultural world views shape cultural value systems and priorities.
    8. Explain how world views serve as predictors of cultural perceptions and actions.
    9. List the four rules of language.
    10. List the four uses of language
    11. Define language.
    12. Identify the factors which shape translation and interpretation issues.
    13. Identify uses of nonverbal communication.
    14. Identify the role of culture in determining nonverbal behavior.
    15. Define proxemics.
    16. Explain how the use of space and touch is culturally conditioned.
    17. Define chronemics.
    18. Explain how the use of time is culturally conditioned.
    19. Identify various family structures.
    20. Explain how culture influences family structure.
    21. Define exogamy and endogamy.
    22. Define and identify co-cultures.
    23. Understand how cultural rules define the appropriateness of the relationships we form
    24. Identify factors regarding how business etiquette is culturally oriented.
    25. Identify factors regarding cultural perceptions of health care.
    26. Identify factors regarding cultural perceptions of education.
  
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    CMST 330 Organizational Communication (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Prerequisite Per SBCTC BAS guidelines, “Junior standing or admission to a baccalaureate program”

    Course Description
    Organizational Communication analyzes informal and formal communication practices in contemporary organizations. The course uses theories to examine and resolve organizational communication dilemmas in the context of a rapidly-changing world.

    Student Outcomes
    Students will learn to identify and solve communication problems within a company by being able to do the following:
    1. Conduct a communication audit to analyze an organization’s strengths and weaknesses in sending, receiving, sharing, and negotiating information across various stakeholders.
    2. Develop plans for effective organization communication practices across organizational networks to meet organizational goals.
    3. Facilitate small group communications and resolve conflicts by using effective, organizationally appropriate communication strategies.
    4. Apply key theoretical organizational communication frameworks (bureaucracy, rationality, power systems, etc.) and analyze their effects on complex organizational systems.
    5. Analyze various communication contexts (global, regional, cultural, political, etc.) and evaluate how they may impact organizational communication practices.
    6. Analyze how effective and ineffective communication strategies impact organizational efficiency.
    7. Apply specific theories such as Weber’s Classic Organizational Theory of Fixed Structures and Tompkins and Cheney’s Organizational Control theory in order to address workplace communication challenges.
    8. Apply strategies to communicate effectively in diverse settings and rapidly changing contexts.
  
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    CMST& 101 Introduction to Communications (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    An investigation into communication theory including verbal and non-verbal communication. Communication barriers and processes will be studied. The student will also make presentations before the class.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify parts of the communication model.
    2. Explain the differences between communication contexts, such as intrapersonal, interpersonal, and small group.
    3. Explain the role of self in shaping communication choices.
    4. Analyze the role of perception in the communication process.
    5. Identify factors that affect communicating with persons of different cultures.
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic components and characteristics of language.
    7. Define and identify nonverbal codes and their functions.
    8. Identify and explain how reasoning affects communication.
    9. Acquire empathic listening techniques.
    10. Demonstrate understanding of the reasons we seek relationships.
    11. Describe how roles and norms are developed.
    12. Acquire skills in conflict management and group climate development.
  
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    CMST& 102 Intro to Mass Media (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly JOURN 101 - CCN

    Course Description
    An analysis of structure, trends, and the technology of American mass media industries, including print media, and how they impact individuals, shape society, and influence culture.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize the impact of the mass media on individuals and society.
    2. Explain how media shape our views of reality.
    3. Identify the key owners of major mass media industries.
    4. Explain the market forces, such as ratings, demographics and competition, that drive mass media decision-
    making.
    5. Define terms such as gate-keeping, agenda-setting, filters, noise, social cohesion and common denominator.
    6. Explain the impact of mass media issues such as censorship and violence.
    7. Explain how key social innovations such as the printing press, the Industrial Revolution, and the satellite altered
    the nature of information dissemination.
    8. Recognize the difference in audiences served before and after the introduction of mass marketing in the
    19th century.
    9. Identify ways in which individuals can influence the mass media industries to make them more useful and
    responsive to a society.
  
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    CMST& 210 Interpersonal Communication (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Course Description
    This course focuses on the theoretical and applied exploration of interpersonal communication as a tool for building and maintaining relationships.

    Student Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, successful students should be able to:

    Explain the importance and development of interpersonal communication.
    Identify and apply individually centered theories of interpersonal communication to an experience, for the purpose of understanding the role of self in communication choices.
    Identify and apply discourse or interaction-based theories of interpersonal communication to an interaction, for the purposes of improving interactions with others and reducing conflict.
    Identify and apply relationship-oriented theories of interpersonal communication to a relationship, for the purposes of improving and maintaining interpersonal relationships.
    Understand and explain the importance of different identities and/or positionalities in interpersonal interactions.
    Identify and demonstrate techniques for creating supportive communicative climates.
  
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    CMST& 220 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPCH 110 - CCN

    Course Description
    A beginning course in public speaking, requiring frequent presentations before the class, emphasizing speech organization, audience analysis, organization and delivery.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Recognize benefits of public speaking for personal and professional development
    2. Acquire a general knowledge of techniques to use for managing speech anxiety
    3. Recognize the similarities and differences between public speaking and other communication formats such as small groups and interpersonal communication settings
    4. Apply the guidelines of ethical public speaking conduct
    5. Identify and apply multiple strategies for discovering the nature of your audience and adapting your message according
    6. Identify and apply multiple strategies for developing thoughtful topic selection techniques
    7. Demonstrate the ability to design a research plan for information gathering
    8. Demonstrate skill in selecting relevant proofs to support claims
    9. Identify and use a variety of proofs to support claims
    10. Evaluate the effectiveness of research plan
    11. Demonstrate ability to incorporate and cite research in oral presentation
    12. Discern and apply the four essential components of an introduction
    13. Discern and apply the three essential components of a conclusion
    14. Design an effective outline that reflects the organizational choices of the speaker
    15. Identify and choose from various organizational strategies for persuasive speaking contexts
    16. Understand the anatomy of an argument (claims, data, warrants)
    17. Construct logical arguments for the audience
    18. Apply knowledge of argument strategies to persuasive address. Understand and apply various persuasive strategies.
    19. Use rhetorical devices to enhance the quality of the persuasive message
    20. Acquire skills for critiquing public address from a variety of standards such as ‘conformity to the principles of the art’ or ‘historical justification standard
    21. Demonstrate knowledge of the four primary delivery modes
    22. Demonstrate particular skill with extemporaneous delivery
    23. Incorporate relevant visual aids into a presentation
    24. Assess when visual aids are necessary
  
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    CMST& 230 Small Group Communication (5 credits)



    Distribution Area Fulfilled Humanities; General Transfer Elective
    Formerly SPCH 115 -CCN

    Course Description
    Understanding the principles and processes of oral communication within groups. The course uses theory with practice in participating in group presentations and meetings.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Identify and explain the three myths of communication.
    2. Define communication.
    3. Recognize the parts of a system and apply them to the group setting.
    4. Use the concepts of synergy and interconnectedness in the group process.
    5. Demonstrate comprehension of the four steps in the group cycle.
    6. Identify and use the steps for integrating newcomers into preexisting groups.
    7. Identify the roles played by culture and gender in the group process.
    8. Distinguish a variety of followership behaviors through the use of an interaction process analysis.
    9. Understand the different means by which a leader may rise to power.
    10. Describe the process by which a leader can maintain leadership of a group.
    11. Demonstrate conflict management techniques for resolving difficulties in a group as well as dealing with difficult group members.
    12. Identify power and ways to successfully manage it.

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 103 Online Learning: Getting Started (2 credits)



    Prerequisite Regular access to the Internet and familiarity with Web and E-mail.

    Course Description
    Through an introductory online experience, the student will learn about how online courses work and the personal preparation required for successful learning online. Topics covered include technical preparation, navigating the online course environment, online relationships, and how online learning differs from face-to-face instruction. The class will help students identify when and how online learning is best incorporated into their educational activities.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Access and navigate an online classroom. (A, B,C, D, E)
    2. Review classmates’ work, communicating ideas and opinions constructively in online classroom activities and discussion forums. (B, D)
    3. Compare the characteristics of face-to-face and online instruction. (B, C)
    4. Determine personal relevance of social trends in online learning. (B, C)
    5. Identify personal motivational strategies for successful online learning. (B, C)
    6. Demonstrate basic productivity software skills, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint. (A,B,C D)
    7. Follow written instructions. (B, D)
    8. Write clearly, using acceptable grammar, complete sentences, punctuation, etc. (B, D)
    9. Contribute to the creation of a collaborative online learning community (A, B, D)
    10. Use Web-based search tools and library resources to gather information. (B, C)
  
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    CIS 121 Introduction to Computer Information Systems (5 credits)



    Course Description
    Introduction to the fundamentals of a computer, including the information processing cycle. Survey of computer technology, computer nomenclature, and the use of computers as productivity tools. Students will develop an understanding of personal computers and emphasize their use as both stand-alone and networked systems. Current microcomputer-based application programs and higher-level programming language exercises and lab assignments allow each student to interact with computer technology, hardware, Internet and concepts of common application programs.

    Student Outcomes
    1. Use and maintain a secure, efficient computer system
    2. Differentiate between and use operating system software, networking software, programming languages and a variety of application software.
    3. Identify current, future, and historic events in the computer field and their global effects on society.
    4. Use a computer system for interactive communications.
    5. Define terminology associated with the computer field.
    6. Define a computer information system and differentiate between data and information including the characteristics or qualities of information.
    7. Identify issues in computer ethics.
    8. Identify examples of capabilities and limitations of computers.
    9. Create, edit and execute a program exercising control structures using one of a variety of programming languages.
    10. Identify the history and trends of computer careers.
 

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